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World Bank report released Monday suggests climate change could force 216 million people across six regions to migrate within their countries in the next 30 years

According to a report released by world bank recently, the climate change could force 216 million people across six regions to migrate within their countries in the next 30 years, with "hotspots" emerging within the next nine years unless urgent steps are taken.

The "Groundswell Part 2" report examines how climate change is a powerful driver of migration within a nation because of its impact on people's livelihoods through droughts, rising sea levels, crop failures and other climate-related conditions.

The original Groundswell climate report was published in 2018 and detailed projections and analysis for three world regions: sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Latin America. "Groundswell 2" conducted similar studies on East Asia and the Pacific, North Africa, and eastern Europe and Central Asia.

"Groundswell Part 2" report examines how climate change is a powerful driver of migration. Photo by Mika Baumeister on Unsplash

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Photo by Torsten Dederichs on Unsplash

COLDEX, will be created under a five-year, $25 million Science and Technology Center award announced on Thursday.

The Oregon State University will lead a National Science Foundation-funded effort to discover Antarctica's oldest ice and learn more about how the earth's climate has changed over the past several million years.

The Center for Oldest Ice Exploration, or COLDEX, will be created under a five-year, $25 million Science and Technology Center award announced on Thursday. The center will bring together experts from across the US to generate knowledge about earth's climate system and share this knowledge to advance efforts to address climate change and its impacts.

"This is fundamental exploration science," said Ed Brook, a paleoclimatologist in OSU's College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences and the principal investigator for COLDEX.

"What we're after is to see how the earth behaves when it is warmer than it has been in the last one million years. In order to do that, we have to find and collect ice cores that go back that far."

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A group of Bangladeshi village children who have lost their homes due to erosion near a riverbed stand on the banks of the river Jamuna, in Manikonj, 40 kilometres north of the Bangladesh capital of Dhaka. July 4, 2008.

NEW DELHI - In the vast Sunderbans delta that spans eastern India and Bangladesh, coastal erosion due to rising sea levels has been slowly carving away chunks of its low-lying islands, forcing thousands of people to relocate, according to climate experts.

"When we talk to families in the Sunderbans, we find that only elderly people are left behind. Many young people are already working in different parts of the country as day laborers or semiskilled workers," Harjeet Singh, senior adviser at Climate Action Network International, said.

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Photo by Ralph (Ravi) Kayden on Unsplash

Oil Palm "monoculture" could be another recipe for disaster. It may go against the natural rhythm of biodiversity.

By Salil Gewali

The past 100 years have witnessed the major injuries being inflicted upon the most beautiful planet in the solar system. We have in fact senselessly punctured mother earth in pursuit of our selfish ambition. We only felt important to respond to our base impulses of greed. We never gave a second thought to the consequences of our ceaseless exploitation of the earth's crust. Has the deep rat-hole mining not already disfigured many parts of Jaintia Hills, and other places resulting in a number of tragedies in the recent past? Since prudence and greed are inversely proportional, we have totally lost our own sanity in the process. Are we --- the so-called academically qualified people, not fully responsible for all the ecological mess and the change of climate now? We hardly can discriminate right from wrong. This present controversial plan of oil palm "monoculture" could be another recipe for disaster. It may go against the natural rhythm of biodiversity.

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