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G-20 members agreed to provide aid to Afghanistan, but will not recognise Taliban government

Members of the G-20 meeting in a virtual summit pledged to provide aid to the people of Afghanistan in a bid to prevent a humanitarian catastrophe in the war-torn country, Tolo News reported.

The summit was hosted by Italy on Tuesday. Some members of the summit cited that provision of aids didn't indicate recognition of the "Taliban" government.

Angela Merkel, the Chancellor of Germany, said that her country is not ready to recognise the "Taliban". According to her, the Taliban have not met the international measures and expectations of the world, the report said.

The US said that it would provide donation through aid organisations to the people of Afghanistan.

Addressing the summit, US President Joe Biden also expressed concerns over the presence of armed groups such as ISIS-K or so-called Daesh group in Afghanistan.

The European Union pledged to provide one million Euro in support of humanitarian donation to the country.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said that the international community emphasised on preservation of the human rights, particularly the rights of girls and women.

The summit was not attended by the Presidents of China and Russia.

This comes as earlier, the UN and humanitarian organisations had warned of triggering a severe humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan.

(IANS/JB)

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