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By N. Lothungbeni Humtsoe

When we think about New Year resolutions, losing those extra pounds, reading that book, switching to a healthy diet are some of the few things everyone wants to do. The key is to choose your resolutions wisely and make them happen. A study conducted by researchers at the University of Scranton found that 23 percent of people quit working on their resolution just two weeks into the new year, only 19 percent of resolution setters stick to their goals over the long haul.

Here's a smart guide to identifying the right resolutions to improve your life, creating a plan to reach it, and becoming part of the small group of people who successfully achieve their goals.

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For many people, the beginning of a new year represents the beginning of a new chapter of their life.

For many people, the beginning of a new year represents the beginning of a new chapter of their life. Setting health objectives such as losing unhealthy weight, adopting a healthier diet, and beginning a workout routine are common resolutions for some people. In most cases, however, health and wellness plans are extremely restrictive and unsustainable, resulting in the majority of individuals abandoning their commitments within a few weeks after starting.

Making resolutions, when done realistically, maybe a healthy and beneficial approach to set objectives and intentions for the upcoming year and beyond. Making the decision to make positive changes, such as quitting a harmful habit and adopting a healthy one, is always a wonderful idea. What we fail to recognize is that the problem isn’t that we aren’t capable of sticking to our resolutions; instead the problem is, that we aren’t motivated to do so. It is important to set up resolutions that can promote a healthy lifestyle and be followed for the rest of one’s life to avoid the cycle of making and breaking them year after year.

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So, despite our best intentions, why is it so difficult to stick to resolutions?

As we approach the end of the year, we may feel more aware or confused, more focused or distracted, more poised or ruffled, more driven or more settled, more ambitious or content - all of this is fine. Whatever our mood, we are preoccupied with working out a list of new year resolutions and how to keep them this time.

So, despite our best intentions, why is it so difficult to stick to resolutions? It doesn't matter if the resolution is to start a new habit or to give up an addiction; it all comes down to consistency and dedication.

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Resolutions are only the first step towards change. Pixabay

Around 80 percent of New Year’s resolutions are dropped by the second week of February. Strava conducted research using over 800 million user-logged activities in 2019, which found that most people give up their resolutions by January 19, often referred to as “Quitters Day”. Getting into ‘best shape’ or ‘losing weight’ is the resolution kept most by people, over the years.

In the generation we are living in, approximately 2.1 billion people are overweight or obese, which means, obesity is a very common condition globally. Hence it is natural that most of us resort to weight-loss as a resolution. If you’ve made it past the “quitters” list and want to be a part of the 20 percent who don’t drop out by the second week of February, here are a few key pointers to keep you motivated to achieve your weight goal.

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