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Pneumonia, an acute respiratory infection, is a recognized public health emergency in India

Pneumonia, an acute respiratory infection, is a recognized public health emergency in India. It is associated with an annual mortality rate of roughly 2.5 million adults and children globally. India alone accounts for 23 per cent of the global pneumonia burden.

(i) In 2018, 9,28,485 people were affected by pneumonia nationwide. At 16.9 per cent, it also forms the second highest cause of infant mortality in India.

(ii) Caused by virus, bacteria or fungi, pneumonia inflames the air sacs in one or both lungs, making breathing painful by limiting oxygen intake. The most common cause of bacterial pneumonia is streptococcus pneumonia.

The Need for Early Diagnosis


Despite being an identifiable and treatable condition, pneumonia diagnosis is often delayed, leading to disease progression and preventable deaths. Typical sputum culture to identify the cause of pneumonia or other respiratory tract infections can take between 24 and 48 hours. This hinders effective care delivery and targeted treatment interventions. Point-of-care tests, such as urinary rapid antigen tests, can overcome the barrier of waiting time for an accurate diagnosis with laboratory tests. A rapid test is a powerful tool in the hands of doctors to enable quick testing and swift identification of the causative pathogen, often in as little as 15 minutes. As a result, care providers in clinical settings can easily recommend appropriate, targeted therapeutic approaches.


person holding cylindrical medicine Despite being an identifiable and treatable condition, pneumonia diagnosis is often delayed, leading to disease progression and preventable deaths | VOA

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