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Twitter will soon let you add content warnings

Under the new CEO Parag Agrawal, Twitter is doubling down on efforts to sanitise its platform and now, the micro-blogging platform is piloting a new feature that will let users add specific content warnings to individual photos and videos sent out in tweets.

Currently, the Twitter users can add content warnings to tweets but it happens with all of their tweets and not specific ones regardless of whether the tweet has sensitive material or not.

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"People use Twitter to discuss what's happening in the world, which sometimes means sharing unsettling or sensitive content. We're testing an option for some of you to add one-time warnings to photos and videos you Tweet out, to help those who might want the warning," the company tweeted late on Wednesday.

Once you post the tweet with a warning, the image or video will appear blurred out, with a content warning explaining why you have flagged it.

Agrawal has already said that his top priority in the new role is to improve the company's execution and streamline how the micro-blogging platform operates.

Twitter is also overhauling the way it handles problematic and abusive tweets reported by its users, aiming to bring a more 'human first' approach to improve the quality of tweets flagged by its users for misinformation, hate speech, spam and others.

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Photo by Jorge Fernández on Unsplash

Take a look at these entertaining time-killing websites and put an end to boredom.

Boredom seems to be an unavoidable aspect of existence. Sure, you can pass the time on social media sites like Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter when you’re bored but you can only browse for so long before things become monotonous and uninteresting. The internet has revolutionized the world in various ways, be it politics, shopping, or journalism, to name a few. It has also completely redefined how individuals spend their time.

If there is ever a point when the internet is the most beneficial, it’s for curing boredom. Internet is vast and has dozens of websites that may be used to break the monotony.

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The micro-blogging platform already covers explicit instances of abusive behaviour

Twitter has announced to ban sharing of private media, such as photos and videos, without permission from the individuals that are shown in those images.

The micro-blogging platform already covers explicit instances of abusive behaviour under its policies, the expansion of the policy will allow the platform to take action on media that is shared without any explicit abusive content, provided it's posted without the consent of the person depicted.

Follow NewsGram on Instagram to keep yourself updated.

"Sharing personal media, such as images or videos, can potentially violate a person's privacy, and may lead to emotional or physical harm," Twitter said in a blog post late on Tuesday.

"The misuse of private media can affect everyone, but can have a disproportionate effect on women, activists, dissidents, and members of minority communities. When we receive a report that a Tweet contains unauthorised private media, we will now take action in line with our range of enforcement options," the company informed.

Under the existing policy, publishing other people's private information, such as phone numbers, addresses, and IDs, is already not allowed on Twitter.

This includes threatening to expose private information or incentivising others to do so.

"There are growing concerns about the misuse of media and information that is not available elsewhere online as a tool to harass, intimidate, and reveal the identities of individuals," Twitter said.

When Twitter is notified by individuals depicted, or by an authorised representative, that they did not consent to having their private image or video shared, it removes it.

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Using social media in moderation isn't bad. It becomes a problem when this becomes a habit.

By Dr. Vihan Sanyal

Most teenagers use social media accounts like Facebook and Instagram these days. It keeps a person connected to friends across the globe and gives them a window into the lives of people they are connected with.

Multiple studies have shown that teenagers who use social media excessively do so because they are either bored, need an escape from their immediate physical environment, are feeling overwhelmed and stressed, are lonely, have few real-time friends or need to feel appreciated and validated.

Follow NewsGram on Quora Space to get answers to all your questions.

Using social media in moderation isn't bad. In fact, it can help boost serotonin and other feel-good chemicals in the brain and can help uplift a person's mood. Most people take a selfie of themselves and post it on social media, and feel good about themselves when people like their post and comment on it. It becomes a problem when this becomes a habit. Many people feel compelled to post photos of themselves multiple times a day and then keep checking their accounts for the number of likes they have received.

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