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Taj Mahotsava and its diminishing appeal among foreign tourists

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By Brij Khandelwal

Agra: The 10-day cultural festival adorning the city every year, the Taj Mahotsava, failed to attract foreign tourists this time. Industry stakeholders state the fair is not more than a local “mela-tamasha” (fun fair) now.

Apparently, the extravaganza is organized to attract foreign tourists but has in no way helped promote tourism in the city.

The number of foreign tourists has been falling each year and the local ambiance has hardly become “tourist-friendly,” said senior tourism industry leader Rajiv Tiwari, president of Paryatan Mitra, which formed a human chain to highlight the issue. Tiwari said there was a clear “disconnect” between government policies, perceptions and the requirements of the tourism industry.

At a press conference ahead of the Taj Mahotsava, which began on Thursday, Agra divisional commissioner Pradip Bhatnagar stated he did not want crowds at the programs but tourists.

“In that case, he should have organized the festival in a five-star hotel and not at the fair ground and at half-a-dozen spots in the city,” retorted an angry Ved Prakash, a guide.

“So many events in one month, starting with the Taj Marathon, the Taj Car race, the star-studded Taj Mahotsava, the golf tournament (a part of the festival), the Taj Literature Festival and so on. Instead of just one month, these activities should have been phased out and a calendar of events for the whole year drawn up,” said senior hotelier Surendra Sharma, founder-president of the Agra Hotels and Restaurants Association.

“There is a lack of planning and of understanding the dynamics of the tourism industry. Though the number of visitors to the Taj Mahotsava has been going up, the failure of the organizers to attract foreign tourists calls for a thorough review of strategies and efforts,” Sharma told reporters.

Some tourism industry leaders feel the Taj Mahotsav has made no impact on tourism and not helped in drawing foreigners. They say the original objectives to organize the fair were not being fulfilled. The fair had got too much localized like some kind of an extended village Haat.

The fair lacks its distinct appeal and thrust areas that could interest foreign visitors.

“The tourists fail to get a glimpse of the splendor and opulence of the Mughal era,” Rakesh Chauhan of the Agra Hotels and Restaurants Association told reporters, adding: “Year after year, you cannot go on repeating the same old features.”

“It should not remain a government show managed by indifferent bureaucrats. The industry too should share some responsibility,” Chauhan contended. (IANS) (Image source: brandife.com)

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Ganga Jal project in Agra postponed till August

Agra's 20 lakh odd residents are supplied water from two water works. Against the demand for 500 MLD, the supply is hardly 300 MLD. The gap is likely to be met by the new Ganga Jal pipeline which will bring Ganges water to Agra.

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Taj Mahal(Agra), Pixabay

A formal inauguration of the ambitious Rs 3,000 crore Ganga Jal project, to ease water supply situation in the Taj city, has again been postponed – to August.

The 130-km-long pipeline from Bulandshahar’s Palra Jhaal canal of the Ganges was to have been commissioned in November last year.

But it was postponed after the refusal of the UP-Forest Department to chop some trees.

"Agra gets only a trickle. Since there is no storage facility in Agra, the monsoon water goes waste," river activist Harendra Gupta said.
River Ganga. Pixabay

Members of the Central Empowered Committee instituted by the Supreme Court visited the site in March and sought to know how the lost green cover would be compensated. A vacant stretch in Firozabad district has now been identified where plantation work would start next month.

Agra’s 20 lakh odd residents are supplied water from two water works. Against the demand for 500 MLD, the supply is hardly 300 MLD. The gap is likely to be met by the new Ganga Jal pipeline which will bring Ganges water to Agra.

Also Read: Rohingya influx is a threat to common security of the entire region

According to Jal Nigam officials presently submersible pumps, tube wells and hand pumps are meeting the additional demand for water.

Since the Yamuna water is stored in upstream barrages from Hathini Kund, Wazirabad, Okhla to Gokul, what flows in the Yamuna in the name of water is plain industrial effluents and domestic waste plus sewer.

“Agra gets only a trickle. Since there is no storage facility in Agra, the monsoon water goes waste,” river activist Harendra Gupta said. (IANS)