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Taliban rejects ceasefire appeal for Ramadan, says will increase attacks during the holy month

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marines-60540_640A media report said that the Taliban militant group has rejected a truce appeal made by Afghan clerics to halt terror activities during the holy month of Ramadan.

A Taliban spokesperson said that not only are they rejecting the truce offer but will increase their attacks during Ramadan, Khaama Press reported.

Taliban announced their stance after the clerics appealed to the insurgent group to stop their attacks in Afghanistan and allow people to devote themselves to prayer.

Ramadan is a holy month observed by Muslims with fasting, introspection and prayer and will begin from June 18.

– (IANS)

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Sleep Disturbances can Trigger Migraine Attacks: Study

Sleep disturbance linked to migraine risk

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A disturbed sleep can affect patients with Migraine. Pixabay

Researchers have found that nearly half of all patients who suffer migraines report sleep disturbance as a trigger for their headaches.

The research team from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in US conducted a study using objective measures of sleep to date to evaluate the relationship between sleep and migraine headaches.

The study’s findings, published in the journal Neurology, generally support patients’ reports of sleep disturbance as a trigger for migraines.

In the assessments and actigraphy measurements, the research team observed that sleep fragmentation — time spent in bed, but not asleep — was linked to migraine onset not on the next day but rather the day after that.

“Sleep is multi-dimensional, and when we look at certain aspects such as sleep, we found that low sleep efficiency, which is the amount of time you’re awake in bed when you’re trying to sleep, was associated with migraines not on the day immediately following, but on the day after that,” said study researcher Suzanne Bertisch from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre in US.

Migraine
Time spent in bed, but not being asleep is linked to migraine onset not on the next day but a day after that. Pixabay

For the results, Bertisch and colleagues conducted a prospective cohort study of 98 adults with episodic migraines, who reported at least two headaches, but had fewer than 15 days each month with a headache.

The participants completed electronic diaries twice a day, recording details about their sleep, headaches and health habits for six weeks.

During that time, they also wore a wrist actigraph to bed to objectively capture their sleep patterns.

The team adjusted data for other migraine triggers, including daily caffeine intake, alcohol intake, physical activity, stress and more.

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Over the course of six weeks, participants reported 870 headaches. Nightly sleep duration of 6.5 hours or less and poor sleep quality were not associated with migraines the day immediately following (Day Zero) or the day after that (Day One).

However, sleep fragmentation measured by both diary and actigraphy were associated with higher odds of having a migraine on Day One, the study said. (IANS)