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Teenagers highly active on Social Media more prone to Suicide risk!

Community with its intense pressure to succeed, coupled with narrowly defined ideals about what youths should be, can perpetuate teenage suicide clusters

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New York, Sept 10, 2016: Being socially connected has become a must for the teens today! The homogeneous culture and intense degree of social connectedness of a community can contribute to teenage suicide as well as thwart prevention efforts, says a study contradicting popular notions about being socially connected.

“The findings highlights the downside to social connectedness, something that is usually touted as a key tool for suicide prevention,” said Anna S. Mueller, Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago in Illinois, US.

Community with its intense pressure to succeed, coupled with narrowly defined ideas about what youths should be, can perpetuate teenage suicide clusters, in which a series of suicides happen around the same time and in close proximity.

Fears of not living up to such ideals combined with the ease with which private information became public, due to social connectedness, leave teenagers and their parents unwilling to seek help for mental health problems.

Despite having social connections within the community, such conditions rendered youths who were already struggling particularly vulnerable to suicide, the researchers explained.

“Our study also helps explain why some schools with intense academic pressure have problems with suicide while others do not. It’s not just the pressure, but a combination of certain community factors that can make asking for help even harder,” Mueller added.

The study demonstrated how community needs to be considered when assessing vulnerabilities, and why prevention organisations should no longer view social connectedness exclusively as a positive force in measuring suicide risk.

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For the study, the team focussed on a single community, in which 19 students or recent graduates of the local high school had committed suicide between 2000 and 2015. Their field research included interviews and focus groups involving a total of 110 people.

The initiative to create various programmes to help students divert perceived failure and development of academic pressure were keenly recommended, the researchers said, in the paper published in the journal American Sociological Review. (IANS)

  • Manthra koliyer

    Social networking sites also divert our minds from academics!

  • Ayushi Gaur

    Social networks are a mesmerizing web of merits and demerits

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Knight Foundation Pledging Nearly $50 Million for Research in How Social Media Impacts Democracy

The grants announced Monday by the Miami-based Knight Foundation partly respond to the manipulation

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Knight Foundation, Research, Social Media
FILE - Students discuss First Amendment rights at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., April 2. 2016, during a conference sponsored by the Newseum Institute and Knight Foundation. (Photo credit - Mark Schierbecker via Flickr). VOA

A foundation that specializes in journalism is pledging nearly $50 million for research in how social media and technology impacts democracy.

The grants announced Monday by the Miami-based Knight Foundation partly respond to the manipulation of tech giants like Facebook and Twitter during the 2016 election. Eleven universities and research institutions are recipients.

Knight Foundation, Research, Social Media
A foundation that specializes in journalism is pledging nearly $50 million for research in how social media and technology impacts democracy. Pixabay

Besides trying to get a bead on social media’s impact on election campaigns, the grants include projects on the spread of disinformation and how newsrooms can address polarization in society. The foundation says it is time for society to understand the issues through data and not emotion.

Also Read- Scientists: Milky Way Merged with Another Smaller Galaxy Roughly 10 Billion Years Ago

Grants will go to New York University, Carnegie Mellon, George Washington, North Carolina, the University of Washington, Indiana, Stanford, Texas, Wisconsin, Yale and the Data & Society Research Institute. (VOA)