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Terror Strikes Somalia: Five killed in Twin Car Bomb Blast in Mogadishu

Al-Shabaab, which means "The Youth" or "The Youngsters" in Arabic, is a terrorist group based in East Africa

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Five killed in Somalia attack. Representational Image source: Wikimedia Commons
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In twin car bomb blasts in Somalia’s capital Mogadishu, five people were killed and several got injured badly on Sunday, July 31.

Police said the blasts hit the gate of the Criminal Investigation Department headquarters before militants stormed the building. Spontaneous gunfire could be heard, Xinhua news agency reported.

The Al-Shabaab militant group claimed responsibility for the attack. The group, which is fighting against the Somali government, frequently stages attacks in Mogadishu.

Five killed in Somalia attack. Representational Image Wikimedia Commons.
Five killed in Somalia attack. Representational Image Wikimedia Commons.

“There were two huge bombings near Somali’s CID headquarters. I have seen black smoke rising from the place,” a witness said.

The death toll could rise as the injured were in critical condition, a police official told Xinhua. The CID headquarters is located alongside on a busy road.

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Al-Shabaab, which means “The Youth” or “The Youngsters” in Arabic, is a terrorist group based in East Africa.

The group battles with the UN-backed government in Somalia and has carried out a string of attacks in neighbouring Kenya.

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Allied to Al Qaeda, the group has been pushed out of most towns it once controlled but it remains a potent threat to peace and stability in the region. (IANS)

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2 War-Stricken Towns In Somalia Finally Receive Health care : UN

It is likely many of these displaced people will decide to return to their communities now that the life-saving aid they need can be had closer to home.

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hunger, health care
IOM delivers emergency and essential health services to Bulla Gaduud and Gobweyn, areas recently liberated by the government in Lower Juba region of south-eastern Somalia. VOA

The UN Migration Agency has begun providing life-saving health care to two Somali towns previously inaccessible because of war and conflict.

Tens of thousands of people in the towns of Gobweyn and Bulla Gaduud have been deprived of life-saving health care for nearly three decades. These areas have been too dangerous for aid workers to reach because of the never-ending cycles of war and conflict in the area.

In recent months, International Organization for Migration spokesman, Joel Millman says government forces have succeeded in subduing the armed groups that have made life a misery for local inhabitants. This, he says has opened up these areas to outside help.

hunger, health care
Malnourished and displaced Somali children sit in a tent in their camp on the outskirts of Mogadishu, Somalia. VOA

“For the past 27 years, war and conflict have made healthcare access difficult or impossible in many parts of the country. Now these communities have access to vaccinations, malaria treatment, antenatal care for pregnant mothers, malnutrition screenings and referrals, among other essential services,” Millman said.

Millman says aid agencies who finally were able to reach these towns were dismayed by the prevailing conditions. He says they found high levels of malnutrition and extremely poor immunization coverage.

hunger, health care
A Somali woman walks through a camp of people displaced from their homes elsewhere in the country by the drought, shortly after dawn in Qardho, Somalia, March 9, 2017. Source: VOA NEWS

Because the towns had no humanitarian services, he says many people had abandoned their villages. He says they were living in overcrowded settlements in far-away urban centers where medical care was available.

Also Read: Somalia Calls To Outlaw Female Genital Mutilation

He says it is likely many of these displaced people will decide to return to their communities now that the life-saving aid they need can be had closer to home. (VOA)