Friday November 15, 2019
Home World Terror Strike...

Terror Strikes Somalia: Five killed in Twin Car Bomb Blast in Mogadishu

Al-Shabaab, which means "The Youth" or "The Youngsters" in Arabic, is a terrorist group based in East Africa

0
//
Five killed in Somalia attack. Representational Image source: Wikimedia Commons

In twin car bomb blasts in Somalia’s capital Mogadishu, five people were killed and several got injured badly on Sunday, July 31.

Police said the blasts hit the gate of the Criminal Investigation Department headquarters before militants stormed the building. Spontaneous gunfire could be heard, Xinhua news agency reported.

The Al-Shabaab militant group claimed responsibility for the attack. The group, which is fighting against the Somali government, frequently stages attacks in Mogadishu.

Five killed in Somalia attack. Representational Image Wikimedia Commons.
Five killed in Somalia attack. Representational Image Wikimedia Commons.

“There were two huge bombings near Somali’s CID headquarters. I have seen black smoke rising from the place,” a witness said.

The death toll could rise as the injured were in critical condition, a police official told Xinhua. The CID headquarters is located alongside on a busy road.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

Al-Shabaab, which means “The Youth” or “The Youngsters” in Arabic, is a terrorist group based in East Africa.

The group battles with the UN-backed government in Somalia and has carried out a string of attacks in neighbouring Kenya.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

Allied to Al Qaeda, the group has been pushed out of most towns it once controlled but it remains a potent threat to peace and stability in the region. (IANS)

ALSO READ: 

Next Story

UN: 5.4 Million Face Food Shortage in Somalia Due to Climate-Related Droughts

This latest disaster comes just as Somalis were beginning to recover from the devastating impact of a two-year drought that ended in 2017

0
global hunger
Somalis fleeing hunger in their drought-stricken nation walk along the main road leading from the Somalian border to the refugee camps around Dadaab, Kenya. VOA

The United Nations Refugee Agency warns an estimated 5.4 million people affected by worsening drought in Somalia will likely face severe food shortages by next month without immediate lifesaving assistance.

The U.N. Refugee Agency reports that climate-related droughts are occurring with greater frequency in Somalia. This, it says, is making things worse for the millions of people already displaced and deprived of essential necessities by the country’s chronic instability and conflict.

This latest disaster comes just as Somalis were beginning to recover from the devastating impact of a two-year drought that ended in 2017.

somalia, food shortage, drought
FILE – A Somali family who lost most of their livestock because of severe drought pose for a picture in Wajaale, Somalia, June 2017. (UNHCR/Mustafa Saeed) VOA

That event forced more than a million people to flee their homes in search of food, water and work. The UNHCR reports the current drought has displaced nearly 50,000 people so far this year.

Agency spokesman Babar Baloch says food shortages already are biting. He warns time is running out to help those affected, as the impact of the worsening drought is likely to peak by next month. He said the condition of some 2.2 million people is particularly severe, and they likely will need urgent emergency assistance.

“The risk of death and the dangers that the displaced population or the affected population are facing are real,” he told VOA. “If aid is not provided in time, people could start losing their lives. Let us not forget that in the past years that with efforts of the international community, local authorities and everyone else, famine has been avoided.”

somalia, drought, food shortage
Women who fled drought queue to receive food distributed by local volunteers at a camp for displaced persons in the Daynile neighborhood on the outskirts of Mogadishu, in Somalia, May 18, 2019. VOA

But not every year. In 2011, drought and famine in Somalia killed more than one-quarter of a million people, half of them children under age five.

U.N. agencies agree many lessons have been learned from that tragedy. Baloch says many of the support mechanisms that since have been successfully used to combat such disasters could be quickly reactivated to deal with this crisis.

ALSO READ: Somalia Drought: 2 Million at Risk of Starvation

But he says this can only be done if the money needed to contend with this humanitarian emergency is forthcoming.

Unfortunately, he says the Somali operation remains severely underfunded. He says only 20% of the U.N.’s $710 million appeal for Somali drought relief has been received. (VOA)