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The real story of Haseena Parkar, Dawood Ibrahim’s Sister!

She was the 'Queen of Nagpada'

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Dawood Ibrahim's sister was involved in land grabbing, extortion, kidnapping, and murder.
Dawood Ibrahim's sister was involved in land grabbing, extortion, kidnapping, and murder.
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Haseena Parkar was the younger sister of the most wanted man in India, Dawood Ibrahim. Born 7th of the 12 children, she stood five feet two inches. She was born in Village Mumkam, Ratnagiri district in Maharashtra.

‘Appa’

She got married to Ismail Parkar. The couple was happy but not until long. The Arun Gawli gang saw Ismail as a fit target to teach Ibrahim ‘a lesson’. Ismail Parkar was murdered by the Arun Gawli gang in 1991.

She was known as the Appa of Mumbai. Pixabay
She was known as the Appa of Mumbai. Pixabay

After which, Haseena started operating her brother’s business in Mumbai. She was involved in land grabbing, extortion, kidnapping, and murder.

Settling matters involving builders, she used to demand property in return for the favors. Her properties, reportedly, were worth 5000 crores.

No property could be constructed without her approval in the areas in which the D-company operated.

She was known as the ultimate 'Appa' of Mumbai and the underworld. Pixabay
She was known as the ultimate ‘Appa’ of Mumbai and the underworld. Pixabay

Downfall

She tried of to involve one of her sons, Danish, in the business, as she needed a helping hand. He is known to have died in a car crash in 2006.

Then started the downfall of the ‘Queen of Nagpada’. In 2007, she was booked in a case of extortion for taking Rs 30 lakh from a real estate agent Vinod Avlani.

However, she did not give in easily. The police chased her for months, and finally when she came in for the hearing, she got a bail. No one heard of her thereafter. It is said that Ibrahim had asked her to stay low.

Death

Her son died in a car crash. Pixabay
Her son died in a car crash. Pixabay

She died on 6 July 2014 due to cardiac arrest in Habib Hospital. She died while on Roja.

Shraddha Kapoor starrer 2017 film ‘Haseena Parkar’ is based on her life.

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Good education can curb childhood abuse effects: Study

Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims

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Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
  • A good education may help reduce effects of childhood abuse
  • Abuse which children suffer in young age can make them criminals
  • Poor grades can shift students towards crime too

Good grades and proper schooling may help in protecting victims of childhood abuse from indulging in criminal behaviour in adulthood, a study says.

The emotional and sexual abuse that some kids endure during their childhood can lead them to commit crimes later in life. But when they achieve good grades in childhood and complete their academics, the likelihood of indulging in criminal behaviour declines significantly.

By funding K-12 Public Schools, Qatar Foundation is promoting Arabic in American schools. Pixabay.
Bad education can lead to children moving towards committing crimes. Pixabay.

“Child abuse is a risk factor for later antisocial behaviour,” said Todd Herrenkohl, Professor at the University of Michigan in the US.

“Education and academic achievement can lessen the risk of crime for all youth, including those who have been abused (encountered stress and adversity),” Herrenkohl added.

However, for some children who are weak in academic performance and get suspended in grades seven to nine, the offending habits and antisocial behaviour tends to stay with them even later in life, the researchers said.

Also Read: Strong Relationships May Counter Health Effects of Childhood Abuses

The study, published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, noted that the primary prevention of child abuse is a critical first step to reduce antisocial behaviour at the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Researchers followed 356 people from childhood (ages 18 months to 6 years), school-age (8 years), adolescent (18 years) and adulthood (36 years).

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Child abuse can make children criminals. VOA

Parent-child interactions measured various types of abuse and neglect, and responses also factored educational experiences and criminal behaviour against others or property. Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims.

“Strategies focused on helping school professionals become aware of the impacts of child abuse and neglect are critical to building supportive environments that promote resilience and lessen the risk for antisocial behaviour,” Herrenkohl said. IANS