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The Shah of Sculptors: Meet India’s Legendary Sculptor Himmat Shah

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Sculptor Himmat Shah. Image source: www.openthemagazine.com
  • Himmat Shah will be honored with legends of India award this week
  • Himmat Shah believes that K.G. Subramanyan inspired him the most
  • Himmat Shah started working with art with ceramic mud as it was affordable and he believes that creativity cannot be taught it has to come from within

India is full of creative ideas when it comes to sculptors. For Himmat Shah, Sculpture-making is a cake-walk. This legendary artist from Gujarat leaves one spellbound when one  comes closer to his works. The best way to define Shah is his simplicity. For his efforts in the field of sculpting, Shah will be honored with Legends of India award this week in New Delhi.

Shah was born in Lothal in Gujarat in 1933. He was so restless and devoid of peace in his life that he left his home when he was only 11 years old. Shah said that he found his hard work and imagination into practice with the help of artist-educator, Jagubhai Shah. Shah then moved to Baroda and won government cultural scholarship for four years (1956-1960), said a report by The Hindu.

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A young Himmat Shah with his silver paintings (1960s). Image source: www.openthemagazine.com
A young Himmat Shah with his silver paintings (1960s). Image source: www.openthemagazine.com

Himmat Shah believes that K.G. Subramanyan inspired him the most as he saw a modern artist in Subramanyan. Himmat Shah was also the member of the group founded by J Swaminathan. Himmat Shah further received  a scholarship from French Government. He studied etching from Atelier 17 in Paris in 1967. Shah was once escorted from Kiran Nadar Museum of Art and the irony is that his retrospective works are now present in that Museum at Saket.

Sculptures by Himmat Shah. Image Source: www.saffronart.com
Sculptures by Himmat Shah. Image Source: www.saffronart.com

Followed by his art, Shah is also passionate about food. He reminded that he used to have Puri, Aloo ki sabzi and Desi ghee Laddu in the morning which makes him feel fresh. He is also known for preparing simple food, especially dal. He believes that the food we ate is a tonic for the brain. He assumes that fish is a brain food and he had them too often. But now his passion for preparing food had died as he no longer cooks the food and is made by his maid, mentions The Hindu.

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Shah attended ceramic campaign Gujarat. Shah started working with art with ceramic mud as it was affordable and he believes that creativity cannot be taught it has to come from within.

Now, he is best known for his works in terracotta and bronze. He had his own studio in Jaipur but he continues to modify his search through travelling.

-This article is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Himmat shah has amazing sculptures. Art does not lack behind in India

  • Aparna Gupta

    Himmat Shah is really a great sculptor. He can get World recognition through his works.

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Scientists Reform Face Of Another Human Ancestor

Now, Scientists have come up with a reformed face of a human ancestor

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human, ancestor, scientists, sculpture
This image shows a preliminary portrait of a juvenile female Denisovan based on a skeletal profile reconstructed from ancient DNA methylation maps. IANS

Exactly what our Denisovan relatives who lived 100,000 years ago might have looked like had been anyone’s guess for a simple reason – the entire collection of Denisovan remains includes a pinky bone, three teeth, and a lower jaw. Now, Scientists have come up with a reformed face of a human ancestor.

Now they have got a face. Using genetic data, scientists have now produced reconstructions of these long-lost relatives.

“We provide the first reconstruction of the skeletal anatomy of Denisovans,” said study author Liran Carmel of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel.

“In many ways, Denisovans resembled Neanderthals, but in some traits, they resembled us, and in others they were unique,” Carmel said.

Overall, the researchers identified 56 anatomical features in which Denisovans differed from modern humans and/or Neanderthals, 34 of them in the skull, according to a report published in the journal Cell.

For example, the Denisovan’s skull was probably wider than that of modern humans or Neanderthals. They likely also had a longer dental arch.

Rather than relying on DNA sequences, the researchers extracted anatomical information from gene activity patterns.

human, ancestor, scientists, sculpture
Using genetic data, scientists have now produced reconstructions of these long-lost relatives.
IANS

Those gene activity patterns were inferred based on genome-wide DNA methylation or epigenetic patterns.

To test the method the researchers developed, they first applied it to two species whose anatomy is known: the Neanderthal and the chimpanzee.

They found that roughly 85 per cent of the trait reconstructions were accurate in predicting which traits diverged and in which direction they diverged.

By focusing on consensus predictions and the direction of the change, rather than trying to predict precise measurements, they were able to produce the first reconstructed anatomical profile of the little-understood Denisovan.

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The evidence suggests that Denisovans likely shared Neanderthal traits such as an elongated face and a wide pelvis.

It also highlighted Denisovan-specific differences, such as an increased dental arch and lateral cranial expansion, the researchers said.

“Studying Denisovan anatomy can teach us about human adaptation, evolutionary constraints, development, gene-environment interactions, and disease dynamics,” Carmel said. (IANS)