Sunday August 18, 2019
Home Uncategorized Thermal Power...

Thermal Power Plant Posits Ecosystem in Sunderbans At Stake

The pollution from coal ash, wasted water, increased shipping and effect of industrial development will destroy one of the few remaining ecologically balanced places of the world - "Sunderbans"

0
//
Sunderbans
Tourist boats in the lndian part of the Sunderbans Delta (West Bengal). Wikimedia
  • A 1,320 MW thermal power plant is going to affect the wildlife and aquatic life of Sunderbans
  • It is a joint venture between India and Bangladesh
  • Bangladesh Government claims there would be inconsiderable effect of the Thermal Plant in Sunderbans

June 26, 2017: The environment around is already deteriorating and nature can always take revenge for our selfishness. The beautiful Sunderbans mangrove forests are the barriers of deadly cyclones of Bay of Bengal. But the plan of 1,320 MW thermal plant just 14 km away from South Bangladesh, is a big threat to this UNESCO heritage site. It consists of rich bird conservation areas and wildlife sanctuaries. As per the scientists, this thermal power plant is going to affect the wildlife and aquatic life of the region.

[bctt tweet=”The beautiful Sunderbans forest is deteriorating now with Thermal Plant in the settings.  ” username=”NewsGramdotcom”]

Problems of ‘The Fearsome Sunderban’

A large crocodile basks on the mud on the banks of River matla at Sunderban, West Bengal, India. Wikimedia

It is a joint venture between India and Bangladesh, but this joint venture seems to cost lives and damage the already deteriorated environment. The pollution from coal ash, from wastewater, increased shipping and effect of industrial development will destroy one of the few remaining ecologically balanced places of the world.

Water wastage is another problem. Who doesn’t know about the effects of climate change in the world? It is impossible to solve such problem if we keep wasting water the way we are doing in the name of “development”.

But the Bangladesh Government is adamant claiming that there would be hardly any effect on Sunderbans. Being one of the most climate vulnerable countries, it should fear the wrath of nature and side with eco-friendly and renewable resources of energy. Entire world today is witnessing the effects of non-renewable energy sources like thermal power plants. The added cause of worry is that following this decision, many private players have also come in the picture. In a recent case, just 12 km from Sunderbans, a private company has started their project of 565 MW thermal power plant. Be it India or Bangladesh, effects of such activities is bound to be fatal.

Entire world today is witnessing the effects of non-renewable energy sources like thermal power plants. The added cause of worry is that following this decision, many private players have also come in the picture. In a recent case, just 12 km from Sunderbans, a private company has started their project of 565 MW thermal power plant. Be it India or Bangladesh, effects of such activities is bound to be fatal.


By Supreet Aneja of Newsgram Twitter: @supreet_aneja

Next Story

Climate Change Hitting us Where it Counts: The Stomach

On the ground, climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach — not to mention the forests, plants and animals

0
FILE - Rows of soybean plants grow in a field near Bennington, Neb., July 30, 2018. VOA

On the ground, climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach — not to mention the forests, plants and animals.

A new United Nations scientific report examines how global warming and land interact in a vicious cycle. Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the land, while the way people use the land is making global warming worse.

Thursday’s science-laden report says the combination is making food more expensive, scarcer and even less nutritious.

“The cycle is accelerating,” said NASA climate scientist Cynthia Rosenzweig, a report co-author. “The threat of climate change affecting people’s food on their dinner table is increasing.”

Climate Change, Hitting, Stomach
FILE – The sun sets in Cuggiono near Milan, Italy, July 25, 2019. A new U.N. report on warming and land use says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach. VOA

But if people change the way they eat, grow food and manage forests, it could help save the planet from a far warmer future, scientists said.

Land warming faster

Earth’s land masses, which are only 30% of the globe, are warming twice as fast as the planet as a whole. While heat-trapping gases are causing problems in the atmosphere, the land has been less talked about as part of climate change. A special report, written by more than 100 scientists and unanimously approved by diplomats from nations around the world at a meeting in Geneva, proposed possible fixes and made more dire warnings.

“The way we use land is both part of the problem and also part of the solution,” said Valerie Masson-Delmotte, a French climate scientist who co-chairs one of the panel’s working groups. “Sustainable land management can help secure a future that is comfortable.”

Also Read- Fear of Ebola Virus Brings Border Traffic Between Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo to Virtual Standstill

The report said climate change has worsened land degradation, caused deserts to grow, permafrost to thaw and made forests more vulnerable to drought, fire, pests and disease. That’s happened even as much of the globe has gotten greener because of extra carbon dioxide in the air. Climate change has also added to other forces that have reduced the number of species on Earth.

“Climate change is really slamming the land,” said World Resources Institute researcher Kelly Levin, who wasn’t part of the study but praised it.

And the future could be worse.

Less-nutritious food

Climate Change, Hitting, Stomach
FILE – A farmer cultivates his field near Farmingdale, Ill., Dec. 4, 2009, turning what remains of the plants back into the soil. A new study suggests no-till farming, in which fields are left alone between harvest and planting, releases less greenhouse gas. VOA

“The stability of food supply is projected to decrease as the magnitude and frequency of extreme weather events that disrupt food chains increases,” the report said.

In the worst case scenario, food security problems change from moderate to high risk with just a few more tenths of a degree of warming from now. They go from high to “very high” risk with just another 1.8 degrees (1 degree Celsius) of warming from now.

Scientists had long thought one of the few benefits of higher levels of carbon dioxide, the major heat-trapping gas, was that it made plants grow more and the world greener, Rosenzweig said. But numerous studies show that the high levels of carbon dioxide reduce protein and nutrients in many crops.

For example, high levels of carbon in the air in experiments show wheat has 6 to 13% less protein, 4 to 7% less zinc and 5 to 8% less iron, she said.

Also Read- HP Unveils its New Chromebook in India

Better farming, better diet

But better farming practices, such as no-till agricultural and better targeted fertilizer application, have the potential to fight global warming too, reducing carbon pollution up to 18% of current emissions levels by 2050, the report said.

If people change their diets, reducing red meat and increasing plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables and seeds, the world can save as much as another 15% of current emissions by midcentury. It would also make people more healthy, Rosenzweig said.

Reducing food waste can fight climate change even more. The report said that between 2010 and 2016 global food waste accounted for 8 to 10% of heat-trapping emissions.

Climate Change, Hitting, Stomach
Cedar seedlings grow at a USAID-funded nursery maintained by Lebanon’s Association for Forests, Development and Conservation. (V. Undritz for VOA) VOA

“Currently 25-30% of total food produced is lost or wasted,” the report said. Fixing that would free up millions of square miles of land.

With just another 0.9 degrees of warming (0.5 degrees Celsius), which could happen in the next 10 to 30 years, the risk of unstable food supplies, wildfire damage, thawing permafrost and water shortages in dry areas “are projected to be high,” the report said.

At another 1.8 degrees of warming from now (1 degree Celsius), which could happen in about 50 years, it said those risks “are projected to be very high.”

Most scenarios predict the world’s tropical regions will have “unprecedented climatic conditions by the mid to late 20th century,” the report noted.

 

Agriculture and forestry together account for about 23% of the heat-trapping gases that are warming the Earth, slightly less than from cars, trucks, boats and planes. Add in transporting food, energy costs, packaging and that grows to 37%, the report said.

Great carbon ‘sink’

But the land is also a great carbon “sink,” which sucks heat-trapping gases out of the air.

From about 2007 to 2016, agriculture and forestry every year put 5.7 billion tons (5.2 billion metric tons) of carbon dioxide into the air, but pulled 12.3 billion tons (11.2 billion metric tons) of it out.

“This additional gift from nature is limited. It’s not going to continue forever,” said study co-author Luis Verchot, a scientist at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture in Colombia. “If we continue to degrade ecosystems, if we continue to convert natural ecosystems, we continue to deforest and we continued to destroy our soils, we’re going to lose this natural subsidy…”

Overall land emissions are increasing, especially because of cutting down forests in the Amazon in places such as Brazil, Colombia and Peru, Verchot said.

Stanford University environmental sciences chief Chris Field, who wasn’t part of the report, said the bottom line is “we ought to recognize that we have profound limits on the amount of land available and we have to be careful about how we utilize it.” (VOA)