Tuesday July 17, 2018

This New App Can Score Parkinson’s Severity

The app is available both for Android as well as iOS smartphones

2
//
96
The reason that Parkinson’s disease develops is not known. Wikimedia commons
Republish
Reprint

Computer scientists, including one of Indian-origin, has developed a new smartphone-based app that uses sensors to generate a score that reliably reflects symptom severity in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Parkinson’s is a progressive brain disorder and is often tough to treat effectively because symptoms, such as tremors and walking difficulties, can vary dramatically over a period of days, or even hours.

The new app called “HopkinsPD”, developed by researchers from the Johns Hopkins University, helped Parkinson’s patients to objectively monitor symptoms in the home and then share data to doctors.

Parkinson’s disease is named after Dr James Parkinson (1755-1824), the doctor that first identified the condition. Wikimedia commons
Parkinson’s disease is named after Dr James Parkinson (1755-1824), the doctor that first identified the condition. Wikimedia Commons

“A smartphone-derived severity score for Parkinson’s disease is feasible and provides an objective measure of motor symptoms inside and outside the clinic that could be valuable for clinical care and therapeutic development,” said the research team including Srihari Mohan, undergraduate student at the varsity.

Typically, patients with Parkinson’s disease are evaluated by medical specialists during three or four clinic visits annually, and patients are asked to fill out a cumbersome 24-hour “motor diary” at home to record their mobility, involuntary twisting movements, etc. The doctor then uses this self-reported or imprecise data to guide treatment.

In the new study, published in the journal JAMA Neurology, the team collected the data with the help of “HopkinsPD” app and then using a machine learning technique, they converted it into an objective Parkinson’s disease severity score — that better reflected the overall severity of patients’ symptoms and how well they were responding to medication.

Gionee
The app will be available on all platforms.

This smartphone evaluation does not rely on the subjective observations of a medical staff, and can be administered any time or day in a clinic or within the patient’s home.

The app is available both for Android as well as iOS smartphones. IANS

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

  • fivstar

    When will the app be available in app stores? Thank you.

  • Everly Ray

    In April of last year, i started on natural parkinsons disease herbal treatments from RICH HERBS FOUNDATION, i am happy to report this PD herbal treatment worked very effectively. My parkinson is totally under control, i had a total decline in symptoms, the tremors, shaking, stiffness, congnition and speech problems stopped. Visit rich herbs foundation official web page ww w. richherbsfoundation. c om. My family are amazed at the change and rapid recovery from parkinsons disease.

SHARE
  • fivstar

    When will the app be available in app stores? Thank you.

  • Everly Ray

    In April of last year, i started on natural parkinsons disease herbal treatments from RICH HERBS FOUNDATION, i am happy to report this PD herbal treatment worked very effectively. My parkinson is totally under control, i had a total decline in symptoms, the tremors, shaking, stiffness, congnition and speech problems stopped. Visit rich herbs foundation official web page ww w. richherbsfoundation. c om. My family are amazed at the change and rapid recovery from parkinsons disease.

Next Story

Study: Experimental Drug can Halt Parkinson’s Progression

The drug, named NLY01, is similar to compounds used to treat diabetes and is expected to move to clinical trials this year

0
Study: Experimental Drug can Halt Parkinson's Progression
Study: Experimental Drug can Halt Parkinson's Progression. Pixabay

US researchers have developed an experimental drug that potentially slows down the progression of Parkinson’s disease as well as its symptoms.

In experiments performed with cultures of human brain cells and live mouse models, researchers from the Johns Hopkins University in Maryland reported that the drug blocked the degradation of brain cells that is the hallmark of Parkinson’s disease.

“It is amazingly protective of target nerve cells,” said Ted Dawson, Professor at the University’s School of Medicine.

The drug, named NLY01, is similar to compounds used to treat diabetes and is expected to move to clinical trials this year.

If successful in humans, it could be one of the first treatments to directly target the progression of Parkinson’s, not just the muscle rigidity, spasmodic movements, fatigue, dizziness, dementia and other symptoms of the disorder, Dawson said in the paper published in the journal Nature Medicine.

Parkinsons
Representational image. (IANS)

In a preliminary experiment in laboratory-grown human brain cells, Dawson’s team treated human microglia — a brain cell type that sends signals throughout the central nervous system in response to infection or injury — with NLY01 and found that they were able to turn the activating signals off.

Further, the researchers injected the mice with alpha-synuclein — the protein known to be the primary driver of Parkinson’s disease — and the mice treated with NLY01 maintained normal physical function and had no loss of dopamine neurons, indicating that the drug protected against the development of Parkinson’s disease.

Also Read: Fruit Bats Identified As Source Of Nipah Virus Outbreak in Kerala

In another experiment, the team used mice that were genetically engineered to naturally produce more human-type alpha-synuclein typically used to model human Parkinson’s disease that runs in families.

While under normal conditions, these so-called transgenic mice will succumb to the disease in 387 days, those treated with NLY01 extended the lives by over 120 days.

However, the experimental drug must still be tested for safety as well as effectiveness in people, Dawson cautioned. (IANS)