Thursday May 23, 2019

This year, Diwali in Delhi expected to be significantly more Polluted than in Past Two Years

The Air Quality Index will be 443 on Sunday, or the Diwali day, and reach 472 the day after

0
//
People using Firecrackers to celebrate Diwali,. Flickr

New Delhi, October 29, 2016: Diwali this year in Delhi is expected to be significantly more polluted than in the previous two years.

According to System of Air Quality and Weather Forecasting and Research (SAFAR) of the Ministry of Earth Science, the air quality in the National capital region will be “severe” on October 30 and 31 and “worst” on October 31.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

The Air Quality Index (AQI) will be 443 on Sunday, or the Diwali day, and reach 472 the day after. The AQI between 300 to 400 is rated as very poor, and above 400 is rated as severe.

[bctt tweet=”The Air Quality Index (AQI) will be 443 on Sunday, or the Diwali day, and reach 472 the day after.” username=””]

“The highest levels of PM10 and PM2.5 are expected between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. on the night of October 30 and 31. The air quality will be worst on October 31 and will start to improve from November 1,” says the SAFAR forecast.

There is enough moisture in the air and winds are stagnant, and atmospheric holding capacity of the emissions coming from firecrackers has increased. The highest levels of PM10 and PM2.5 are expected between 11 p.m. to 3 a.m. on the night of October 30-31.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

PM10 is particulate matter 10 micrometers or less in diameter and PM2.5 is particulate matter 2.5 micrometers or less in diameter.

While Noida is expected to be the most polluted area, Lodhi Road in Delhi is expected to be least polluted.

Incidentally, the levels of particulate matter were significantly low in 2016 as compared to 2014 and 2015, but since October 25, started to become significantly higher.

Delhi Pollution Control Committee (DPCC) Senior Scientist M.P. George attributed paddy stubble burning in Punjab and Haryana for this year’s Diwali being more polluted than in 2014 and 2015.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

“One of the chief reasons behind this Diwali being significantly more polluted than last two years, is crop burning in Punjab and Haryana,” said George.

“While every year around this time, farmers in Haryana and Punjab set paddy stubble ablaze to prepare for the next crop season, the pollution this year has been more,” he said .

As per SAFAR health advisory, when the AQI is severe, people should avoid all physical activity outdoors. (IANS)

Next Story

No Stop To Air Pollution in India, Reducing Dirty Fuels Need of The Hour

"Household fuels are the single biggest source of outdoor air pollution in India," said Kirk R. Smith, professor of global environmental health at UC Berkeley.

0
air pollution
"India has got to do other things to fix air pollution -- they've got to stop garbage burning, they've got to control the power plants, they've got to control vehicles and so forth. Pixabay

Mitigating the use of household fuels could reduce air pollution-related deaths in India by approximately 13 per cent, which is equivalent to saving about 270,000 lives a year, an India-US joint study has stressed.

Nearly half of the country’s population relies on dirty fuels such as wood, dung, coal and kerosene for cooking and heating, said researchers from the University of California, Berkeley and the India Institute of Technology-Delhi.

Eliminating emissions from these sources — without any changes to industrial or vehicle emissions — would bring the average outdoor air pollution levels below the country’s air quality standard.

“Household fuels are the single biggest source of outdoor air pollution in India,” said Kirk R. Smith, professor of global environmental health at UC Berkeley.

A study in the Lancet Planetary Health journal last year found that air quality in India is so poor that 1.2 million deaths in the country in 2018 can be attributed to air pollution.

“We looked at what would happen if they only cleaned up households, and we came to this counter-intuitive result that the whole country would reach national air pollution standards if they did that,” Smith added in a paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

pollution
“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses in India are burning dirty fuels every day,” Smith said. Pixabay

The co-authors of the paper are Sourangsu Chowdhury and Sagnik Dey of IIT-Delhi, Sarath Guttikunda of Urban Emissions in New Delhi, Ajay Pillarisetti of UC Berkeley and Larry Di Girolamo of the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

As of early 2016, nearly half of the Indian population was reliant on biomass for household fuel.

“There are 3,000 chemicals that have been identified in wood smoke, and taken at a macro level, it is very similar to tobacco smoke,” Smith informed.

In 2015, India’s average annual air pollution level was 55 micrograms per cubic meter (ug m-3) of fine particulate matter.

Levels in New Delhi often soared beyond 300 ug m-3.

Complete mitigation of biomass as fuel – which could be achieved through widespread electrification and distribution of clean-burning propane to rural areas – would cut India’s average annual air pollution to 38 ug m-3.

fireworks
A study in the Lancet Planetary Health journal last year found that air quality in India is so poor that 1.2 million deaths in the country in 2018 can be attributed to air pollution. Pixabay

While this is still far above the World Health Organization (WHO) standard of 10 ug m-3, it could still have dramatic impacts on the health of the people.

“You can’t have a clean environment when about half the houses in India are burning dirty fuels every day,” Smith said.

“India has got to do other things to fix air pollution — they’ve got to stop garbage burning, they’ve got to control the power plants, they’ve got to control vehicles and so forth.

“But they need to recognise the fact that households are very important contributors to outdoor air pollution, too,” he noted.

In 2016, India instituted a national programme to distribute clean burning stoves and propane to 80 million impoverished households, or about 500 million people.

Also Read: Biopic on PM Modi To Hit The Theaters Post The 2019 Elections Results

Smith hopes the findings would bolster support for reducing outdoor air pollution, as well.

Similar programmes have been successful in China, where air pollution is now on the decline in 80 cities. (IANS)