Wednesday July 17, 2019

To celebrate Indian culture, Luxembourg City in Europe to mark September 17 as ‘India day’

The Ville de Luxembourg (Luxembourg City hall) has played a crucial role in organizing the event along with the Indian Association Luxembourg to strengthen communal harmony

3
//
Chicago: Association of Indians in America, Inc. Illinois Chapter (AIA) proudly organized ‘Group Dance Competition Youth Talent Show on August 27, 2016 at Harper College Auditorium, 1200 W Algonquin Rd, Palatine, IL Asian Media USA

Sept 6, 2016: ‘India day’ is likely to be celebrated on September 17, this year in Luxembourg City. This event is an effort of The Indian Association Luxembourg (IAL) to celebrate Indian Culture as well as promote cultural acceptance through social interaction.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

The event will have stalls displaying Indian Culture and Tradition, which include Henna, Spices, traditional Indian outfits, Indian snacks, and Indian music. Live dance performances from various regions of India are one of the key attractions of the event, which will be commence at 9AM and conclude at around 6PM, in the place d’Armes. The event also aims to highlight ‘Make in India’ and ‘Digital India’ initiatives.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

Chicago: Association of Indians in America, Inc. Illinois Chapter (AIA) proudly organized ‘Group Dance Competition Youth Talent Show on August 27, 2016 at Harper College Auditorium, 1200 W Algonquin Rd, Palatine, IL Asian Media USA
Chicago: Association of Indians in America, Inc. Illinois Chapter (AIA) proudly organized ‘Group Dance Competition Youth Talent Show on August 27, 2016 at Harper College Auditorium, 1200 W Algonquin Rd, Palatine, IL, USA. Asian Media USA

The Ville de Luxembourg (Luxembourg City hall) has played a crucial role in organizing the event along with the Indian Association Luxembourg to strengthen communal harmony.

– by Usman Zafar of NewsGram team

Next Story

Reported Cases of Sexually Transmitted Disease Up by 70% in Europe Since 2010

Amato-Gauci said complacency among men who have gay sex and seem unconcerned about HIV risks appeared to be fuelling the problem

0
sexually transmitted disease
A nurse takes blood from a man for a free HIV test on a bus in Tehran, Dec. 16, 2015. In Europe, for the first time since the early 2000s, syphilis is more common in some countries than new cases of HIV, health experts said Friday. VOA

Syphilis cases have soared in Europe over the last decade and become, for the first time since the early 2000s, more common in some countries than new cases of HIV, health experts said Friday.

Reported cases of the sexually transmitted disease are up by 70% since 2010, a report from the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) showed, with the rise driven by more unprotected sex and riskier sexual behavior among gay men.

“The increases in syphilis infections that we see across Europe … are a result of several factors, such as people having sex without condoms and multiple sexual partners, combined with a reduced fear of acquiring HIV,” said Andrew Amato-Gauci, an ECDC expert on sexually transmitted infections.

The European report comes after the World Health Organization said last month that around a million people each day worldwide catch a sexually transmitted infection.

sexually transmitted disease
FILE – A billboard above a gas station, April 1, 2016, promotes testing for sexually transmitted diseases. The number of cases of STDs – chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis – in California reached a record high in 2017. VOA

Left untreated, syphilis can have severe complications in men and women, including causing stillbirths and newborn deaths and increasing the risk of HIV. Syphilis was one of the leading causes of baby loss globally in 2016.

The Stockholm-based ECDC, which monitors health and disease in Europe, said that overall, more than 260,000 syphilis cases were reported from 30 countries from 2007 to 2017.

In 2017, syphilis rates reached an all-time high with more than 33,000 reported cases, the ECDC said. This meant that for the first time since the early 2000s, the region reported more cases of syphilis than new cases of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS.

But the problem varied significantly by country, with rates more than doubling in five countries — Britain, Germany, Ireland, Iceland and Malta — but dropping by 50% or more in Estonia and Romania.

sexually transmitted disease
Amato-Gauci said complacency among men who have gay sex and seem unconcerned about HIV risks appeared to be fuelling the problem. Pixabay

Close to two-thirds of the cases reported between 2007 and 2017 where sexual orientation was known were in men who have sex with men, the ECDC report said, while heterosexual men contributed 23% of cases and women 15%.

ALSO READ: Goa May Make HIV Tests Mandatory Before Registration of Marriages

The proportion of cases diagnosed among men who have sex with men ranged from less than 20% in Latvia, Lithuania and Romania to more than 80% in France, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden and Britain.

Amato-Gauci said complacency among men who have gay sex and seem unconcerned about HIV risks appeared to be fuelling the problem. “To reverse this trend, we need to encourage people to use condoms consistently with new and casual partners,” he said. (VOA)