Tuesday January 21, 2020

Tooth Decay Can Be Caused Due To Excess Use Of Toothpaste: Study

Young kids may push for independence in brushing their teeth, but kids' toothpaste tastes sweet, according to the team.

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A patient for a regular check up of their teeth.
Picture shows a person's teeth being checked upon.

Many young kids who use toothpaste more than needed are at an increased risk of dental fluorosis when they get older, warns a new study.

Fluorosis is a condition that affects the teeth caused by overexposure to fluoride during the first eight years of life.

Fluoride is a mineral found in water and soil. More than 70 years ago, scientists discovered that people whose drinking water naturally had more fluoride also had fewer cavities. That led to addition of fluoride to tap water, toothpaste, mouthwash and other products.

 

Common Toothpaste Ingredient May Promote Colon Cancer
Common Toothpaste Ingredient May Promote Colon Cancer. Pixabay

However, the study showed that when teeth are forming, too much fluoride can lead to tooth streaking or spottiness or dental fluorosis.

In addition, the study found that although experts recommend no more than a pea-sized amount, about 40 per cent of kids aged three to six used a brush that was full or half-full of toothpaste.

“Fluoride is a wonderful benefit but it needs to be used carefully,” Mary Hayes, pediatric dentist in Chicago was quoted by Daily Mail.

For the study, the researchers from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention included parents of more than 5,000 kids ages three to 15.

Poor dental health may lead to risk of diabetes. Pixabay
Young kids may push for independence in brushing their teeth, but kids’ toothpaste tastes sweet, according to the team. Pixabay

Although the researchers did not determine how many kids developed streaked or spotty teeth as a result of using too much toothpaste, they recommended children under three are only supposed to use a smear of toothpaste the size of a grain of rice, reported Daily Mail.

Kids aged three to six should keep it to a pea-sized amount.

Also Read: This Bengal Teacher Collects, Cooks Food to Feed The Poor Kids

Young kids may push for independence in brushing their teeth, but kids’ toothpaste tastes sweet, according to the team.

“You don’t want them eating it like food. We want the parent to be in charge of the toothbrush and the toothpaste,” noted Hayes. (IANS)

Next Story

Air Pollution, Stress Associated with Thought Problems in Kids: Researchers

Stress likely leads to wide-ranging changes in, for example, epigenetic expression, cortisol, inflammation, and brain structure and function

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Pollution, pollutants, India, air pollution, WHO, diwali
Delhi air quality continues to be 'very poor'. VOA

Parents, please take note. Researchers have revealed that kids with elevated exposure to early life stress in the home and increased prenatal exposure to air pollution exhibited heightened symptoms of attention and thought problems.

Early life stress is common in youth from disadvantaged backgrounds who also often live in areas with greater exposure to air pollution, according to the study, published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

“Prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, a neurotoxicant common in air pollution, seems to magnify or sustain the effects of early life social and economic stress on mental health in children,” said study first author David Pagliaccio from Columbia University in the US.

“Air pollutants are common in our environment, particularly in cities, and given socioeconomic inequities and environmental injustice, children growing up in disadvantaged circumstances are more likely to experience both life stress and exposure to neurotoxic chemicals,” said senior author Amy Margolis.

Air pollution has negative effects on physical health, and recent work has begun to also show the effects on mental health. Life stress, particularly in early life, is one of the best-known contributors to mental health problems.

This new study examined the combined effects of air pollution and early life stress on school-age children.

According to the researchers data were collected from the CCCEH Mothers and Newborns longitudinal birth cohort study in Northern Manhattan and the Bronx, which includes many participants who self-identify as African American or Dominican.

Mothers wore an air monitoring backpack during the third trimester of pregnancy to measure exposure to air pollutants in their daily lives.

Stress
Stress is increasingly becoming a dreaded phenomenon. Lifetime Stock

When their children were 5 years old, mothers reported on stress in their lives, including neighbourhood quality, material hardship, intimate partner violence, perceived stress, lack of social support, and general distress levels.

Mothers then reported on their child’s psychiatric symptoms at ages 5, 7, 9 and 11.

The combined effect of air pollution and early life stress was seen across several measures of thought and attention problems/ADHD at the age 11.

The effects were also linked to PAH-DNA adducts–a dose-sensitive marker of air pollution exposure.

Also Read: Apple Planning to Release ‘The Banker’ in Theaters This March

The researchers said that PAH and early life stress may serve as a “double hit” on shared biological pathways connected to attention and thought problems.

Stress likely leads to wide-ranging changes in, for example, epigenetic expression, cortisol, inflammation, and brain structure and function.

The mechanism underlying the effects of PAH is still being interrogated; however, alterations in brain structure and function represent possible shared mechanistic pathways, the study said. (IANS)