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Himachal Pradesh is a northern Indian state in the Himalayas. Wikimedia Commons
Himachal Pradesh, in India, is a picture-perfect state that impresses tourists with scenic hill stations, quaint villages, snow-covered mountains, lush valleys, diverse flora and fauna, unblemished nature and abundant trekking trails. Himachal is a heaven for nature lovers, adventurers and backpackers. Let’s look at the top 10 places to visit in the ‘Abode of Snow‘.

1. KASOL

Along the banks of Parvati River, lies a photogenic hamlet of Kasol, also known as the ‘Little Israel of India’. Kasol is popular among backpackers and hippies since it is known to be laid back and serene. The beautiful landscape of snow-capped mountains, lush valleys, scenic waterfalls and undisturbed trekking routes makes it a paradise. With an abundance of cozy cafes, budget-friendly stay resorts and hotels and their relaxed vibe makes it an amazing spot.

While in the region, it’s worth exploring the nearby tiny hamlets, one of them being Chalal, which is known for its trance and psychedelic parties and vibe, Malana, known for its Malana Cream (cannabis) and Rasol and Tosh, which are replete with lush greenery and tranquillity. (According to an article on The Culture Trip).


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2. SHIMLA

Shimla, the Queen of Hills, is a gorgeous hill station, where picturesque vistas will mesmerise you at every nook and corner. A place to wander, Shimla has some of the best architecture, which includes the Viceregal Lodge, the Town Hall, Gaiety Theatre and the Christ Church. The location makes it a perfect place for trekking and outdoor fun. The appeal of Shimla increases manifold when the winter sets in – the entire city gets enveloped in snow, a sight to mesmerise!


Host to the Dalai Lama, Himachal Pradesh has a strong Tibetan presence. This is reflected in its Buddhist temples and monasteries, as well as its vibrant Tibetan New Year celebrations. Unsplash

3. KASAULI

At an elevation of 1,900 meters lies a small town, Kasauli. The town has a few attractions, commerce and population. However, that’s exactly where its beauty and appeal lies – its unadulterated and pure air, serene and peaceful vibe, and an abundance of nature is what attracts tourists. The places worth visiting include the Baptish Church, Christ Church, Kasauli Brewery, Monkey Point, Nahri temple and Kasauli Club.

4. DHARAMSHALA

Located in the upper reaches of Kangra Valley, Dharamshala has the best climates in Himachal. Surrounded by snow-laden peaks of Dhauladhar mountains, lush pine and deodar forests, the town is brimming with cultural and architectural attractions, along with a great number of restaurants, cafes catering to its extensive multicultural Indian and Tibetan communities. Its suburbs, such as McLeod Ganj (India’s Mini Tibet), Dharamkot, Sindhbari, Ramnagar and Naddi are worth exploring. Consisting a plethora of trekking trails, waterfalls and scenic valleys, the town beckons adventurers from across the world.

5. SPITI VALLEY

At an altitude of 3,810 meters, Spiti Valley, is a remote village up in the cold mountains. Despite the fact that it is fairly isolated, plenty of spiritual and adventure travellers are gradually making their way to Spiti to explore its many Buddhist monasteries scattered throughout the area, and indulge in thrilling activities. These activities include trekking, mountain biking, whitewater rafting and wildlife spotting. In addition, it is surrounded by several high-altitude villages, like Tabo, Kaza, Dhankar, Kibber, Komic and Langza, which can also be explored on the way to Spiti.

Want to read more in hindi? Check out: संयुक्त राष्ट्र महासभा ने कोविड-19 पर लिया संकल्प.

6. MANALI

Located at a height of 2,050 meters on the River Beas valley, Manali is a picture-perfect hilly retreat that draws in hordes of tourists every year. The landscape of Manali comprises of lush pine and deodar forests, snow-covered mountains, scenic meadows, waterfalls and valleys. They attract adventurers and nature lovers alike. Alternatively, the ancient temples and Tibetan monasteries attract spiritual beings.


Himachal region is also well known for its trekking, climbing and skiing areas. Unsplash

7. CHITKUL

Present in the Kinnaur district of Himachal lies a small yet charming village, Chitkul, Himachal Pradesh. It is perhaps the last inhabited village near the Indo-China border. There isn’t much to see and do in the hamlet, however, its scenic landscape encompassing lush green vegetation, snow-laden mountains and apple orchards, and the presence of tranquil vibe makes it an ideal place for those looking to be at one with nature – in peace and quiet. What particularly interests tourist is its quaint houses, complete with wooden or slate roofs, and a temple that houses a 500-year-old deity of the town.

8. BIR BILLING

Despite its small size, Bir Billing is the it-place for paragliding in Himachal Pradesh, India. Also known as the ‘Paragliding Capital of India’, Bir Billing boasts salubrious weather year-round and a spectacular landscape, which attracts thrill-seekers from across the world. The place offers panoramic vistas of the undulating beauty of the Himalayan mountain ranges.

9. DALHOUSIE

Dalhousie is an any time year-round holiday destination, but looks all the more stunning in the winter months, when the entire hill town is blanketed in white sheet. Brimming with mountains, cascading waterfalls, lakes and lush pine and oak trees, adventure enthusiasts love to visit Dalhousie to partake in outdoor activities, like trekking, river rafting, canoeing, kayaking and camping. While the peaceful atmosphere and pristine nature lures lovers and peace seekers alike.

Also Read: Kongonaphon Kely: A Pocket-Sized Dinosaur Forerunner, Smaller Than a Cellphone

10. KHAJJIAR

Khajjiar is a slice of paradise amidst the dense deodar forests, meadows and snow-capped Himalayas. Also known as the ‘Mini Switzerland of India’, visitors can explore its beautiful scenery, get close with the wildlife at the Kalatop Wildlife Sanctuary, and take part in outdoor activities, such as forest trekking, zorbing, horse riding and paragliding at the Khajjiar Lake. A spot that cannot be missed here is the 12th-century Khaji Nag temple, which is dedicated to Lord of Serpents (Khaji Nag), the temple stands out with its beautiful architecture, which is a concoction of Hindu and Muslim styles.


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It is believed that when a woman goes through her menstrual cycle, she goes through the different lunar energies.

Well, if you'll notice then the moon takes twenty-nine days to complete its lunar cycle, whereas women's menstrual cycle is generally 28 days! Coincidence? I think, not.

It is believed that when a woman goes through her menstrual cycle, she goes through the different lunar energies. In fact, in ancient times it was said that the natural rhythm of women was to menstruate under a new moon and ovulate under a full moon.

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Hugs, caress scenes, extramarital affairs, vulgar and bold dressing, bed scenes and intimacy of married couples are being glamourised in utter disregard to Islamic teachings and culture of Pakistani society," PEMRA stated

The Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (PEMRA) has directed Pak TV channels to stop airing what it calls indecency and intimacy in dramas, Samaa TV reported.

A notification issued by the authority states that it has been receiving numerous complaints from viewers who believe that the content being depicted in dramas does not represent the "true picture of Pakistani society".

"PEMRA finally got something right: Intimacy and affection between married couples isn't 'true depiction of Pakistani society and must not be 'glamourized'. Our 'culture' is control, abuse, and violence, which we must jealously guard against the imposition of such alien values," said Reema Omer, Legal Advisor, South Asia, International Commission of Jurists.

"Hugs, caress scenes, extramarital affairs, vulgar and bold dressing, bed scenes and intimacy of married couples are being glamourized in utter disregard to Islamic teachings and culture of Pakistani society," PEMRA stated, as per the report.

The authority added that it has directed channels time and again to review content with "indecent dressing, controversial and objectionable plots, bed scenes and unnecessary detailing of events".

Most complaints received by the PEMRA Call Centre during September concern drama serial "Juda Huay Kuch is Tarah", which created quite a storm on social media for showing an unwitting married couple as foster siblings in a teaser for an upcoming episode. However, it only turned out to be a family scheme after the full episode aired, but by that time criticism had mounted on HUM TV for using the themes of incest to drive the plot, the report said. (IANS/JB)

Keywords: Pakistan, Islam, Serials, Dramas, Culture, Teachings.


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Dozens of female high school and university students in Afghanistan have joined vocational centers to learn tailoring and cosmetology

Dozens of female high school and university students in Afghanistan have joined vocational centers to learn tailoring and cosmetology as the women and girls have been banned from school and university since the Taliban took over the country, Tolo News reported.

According to these girls, sitting at home is very difficult for them, therefore they are willing to learn a profession.

"It has been a couple of months that we are at home since schools and universities were closed. We have to learn a profession or a job because we can't sit like this at home," said Samira Sharifi, a student.

"I want to learn a profession for my future to help my family, we want our schools to be opened so that we can carry on with our education," said Mahnaz Ghulami, a student.

Most of the trainees in the vocational centres are students of high schools and universities.

After the closure of high schools and universities across Afghanistan, Herat female students have started gaining vocational training in the province.

"We have decided to learn tailoring along with our education," said Shaqaiq Ganji, a student.

"It's necessary for every woman to learn tailoring to help her family and her husband, especially in this bad economic situation," said Laili Sofizada, a teacher.

Due to the closure of schools and universities, the number of students in vocational centers doubled compared to recent years, the report added.

"Our classes had the capacity of 20 to 25 students but we increased it to 45 students, because most of the students have lost their spirit, and their schools and universities have closed," said Fatima Tokhi, director of technical and professional affairs at the Herat department of labour and social affairs.

The Labour and Social Affairs department of Herat said the department is working to provide more opportunities for Herat girls and women to learn vocational training.

"The art and professional sector and the kindergarten departments have started their activities, we support them and supervise their activities," said Mulla Mohammad Sabit, head of the labour and social affairs of Herat.

During the past two months, most of the women and girls who worked in state and private institutions lost their jobs and are trying to learn handicrafts and vocational training. (IANS/JB)


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