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Travelling after Demonetization is a Tricky Business: 8 Ways to Travel in a Hassle-Free Manner!

Several cashless payment apps have wide usage, and even some small and pop stores use them. Download one or two apps

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New Delhi, November 27, 2016: Travelling after demonetization is a tricky business. You are in a new place where no one is prepared to lend you a credit card and no one is willing to sell without the new currency. Try and book all-inclusive packages and check beforehand to ensure that your travel agent will accept cheques or credit and debit cards, says an expert.

Earlier this month, Prime Minister Narendra Modi made a decision to scrap Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 currency notes to curb black money. And if you have plans to travel, Vikram Lalvani, travel advisor of Sterling Holidays, has a few tips to offer on how to travel hassle-free.

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* Book packages: Try and book all-inclusive packages which will cover travel and meals once you reach your destination, so you are not strapped for cash at the last minute.

* Online payment: Book your stay well before reaching the destination. These are not the times to backpack and find a hotel on arrival. So, book online.

* Travel agent: Check before travelling to ensure that your travel agent will accept cheques or credit and debit cards.

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* Local travel: Cash crunch? Use cab services that offer cashless transactions for shuttles between places and rent-a-car services.

* Download mobile wallet apps: Several cashless payment apps have wide usage, and even some small and pop stores use them. Download one or two apps before your journey, so that you can pay electronically wherever possible.

* ATMs and banks: Before leaving home, identify the banks and ATMs near your hotel or on your travel route. On the go, if you spot a branch of your bank or see an ATM, withdraw cash, even if you have enough money or don’t foresee any expenditure.

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* Packing: Ensure that you carry enough medicines and other travel essentials for the entire journey. Do carry your mobile charger and power bank as per your requirements.

* Shopping and eating out: Before you step out of your hotel, research or call ahead and identify restaurants and shops that accept plastic cards or cheques. Usually, larger establishments offer a card swipe facility. (IANS)

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  • Ruchika Kumari

    Good suggestion….all these suggestions are really going to help for hassle free travel

Next Story

The Answer to The Impending Questions On Demonetization Are Here

While it did broaden the country’s tax base, it was a nightmare for the immense, cash-dependent informal economy.

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Indian Currency. Pixabay

Nearly all of the currency removed from circulation in a surprise 2016 attempt to root out illegal hoards of cash came back into the financial system, Resever Bank of India  has announced, indicating the move did little to slow the underground economy.

Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi’s currency decree, which was designed to destroy the value of billions of dollars in untaxed cash stockpiles, caused an economic slowdown and months of financial chaos for tens of millions of people or demonetization.

Modi announced in a November 2016 TV address that all 500-rupee and 1,000-rupee notes, then worth about $7.50 and $15, would be withdrawn immediately from circulation. The banned notes could be deposited into bank accounts but the government also said it would investigate deposits over 250,000 rupees, or about $3,700. The government eventually released new currency notes worth 500 and 2,000 rupees.

 

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An activist of Congress party hold the banned 500 and 1000 rupee notes.

 

In theory, the decree meant corrupt politicians and businesspeople would suddenly find themselves sitting on billions of dollars in worthless currency, known here as “black money.”

“A few people are spreading corruption for their own benefit,” Modi said in the surprise nighttime speech announcement of the order. “There is a time when you realize that you have to bring some change in society, and this is our time.”

But even as the decree caused turmoil for those in India who have always depended on cash — the poor and middle class, and millions of small traders — the rich found ways around the currency switch. In the months after the decree, businesspeople said that even large amounts of banned currency notes could be traded on the black market, though middlemen charged heavy fees.

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Prime Minister Narendra Modi along with mayor, flickr

The reserve bank of India report said in its Wednesday report that 99.3 percent of the $217 billion in notes withdrawn from circulation had come back into the economy. Some officials had originally predicted that number could be as low as 60 percent.

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“Frankly, I think demonetization was a mistake,” said Gurcharan Das, a writer and the former head of Proctor & Gamble in India. He said that while it did broaden the country’s tax base, it was a nightmare for the immense, cash-dependent informal economy.

“You can’t overnight change that in a country which is poor and illiterate. Therefore, for me it’s not only an economic failure but a moral failure as well,” Das said. (VOA)