Monday December 10, 2018
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Trees as spiritual antennas: Science behind how Gautam Buddha, Ramakrishna achieved enlightenment

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BY ANIL K. RAJVANSHI

What will be world without trees? It will be a desolate, desert-like environment. Trees provide balm to eyes, green lung to the planet and solace to the soul. Besides they can also act as antennas for spiritual thought and Universal consciousness.

Gautam Buddha, Ramakrishna and other saints achieved enlightenment under a tree. It is said that even Newton got his idea of universal gravitation when an apple fell from the tree under which he was sitting.

Trees are nature’s water filters, capable of cleaning up the most toxic wastes, including explosives, solvents and organic wastes, largely through a dense community of microbes around the tree’s roots that clean water in exchange for nutrients, a process known as phytoremediation. A 2008 study by researchers at Columbia University found that more trees in urban neighborhoods correlate with a lower incidence of asthma.

Trees have also been used as radio antennas by US and other armies. In fact they have found them to outperform other forms of electrical antennas .

Human thought which is also a form of electromagnetic wave (though we still do not know what its waveform is) could also be transmitted and received using trees as antennas. Natural systems use all the forces surrounding them. Through million years of evolution nature has developed a mechanism of transmitting low level signals through long distances using the surrounding media as transmitting agent.

Thus low level whale songs can be transmitted through thousands of kilometers in ocean. Similarly it is possible that low level signal that we call human thought could be transmitted to long distances with the help of trees as antennas.  My personal experience has been that walking under a canopy of trees not only gives a sense of well being and happiness but also acts as spiritual antenna.

Thus it is in the interest of mankind to populate this planet with trees and forests. Besides nurturing us the trees will also provide a means of communication with beyond.

(The author is the Director and Hon. Secretary Nimbkar Agricultural Research Institute (NARI). He could be reached at  anilrajvanshi@gmail.com)

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  • It reminds me of a fairy tale that I had read in my childhood, almost 62 years ago. The relevant portion runs like this: A prince , being chased by a mighty ogre, can run no further. Fatigue-ridden, he is almost on the point of giving up when he discovers a mighty tree before him. He prays to the tree for shelter and the kindly tree opens itself up to take the prince inside and closes immediately. The life of the prince is saved. Today it seems that fairy tale was a mighty metaphor. The prince represents the human civilisation today. The demon of pollution is bent on devouring it up. The only hope for the survival of humanity lies in seeking a safe refuge with the tree.

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  • It reminds me of a fairy tale that I had read in my childhood, almost 62 years ago. The relevant portion runs like this: A prince , being chased by a mighty ogre, can run no further. Fatigue-ridden, he is almost on the point of giving up when he discovers a mighty tree before him. He prays to the tree for shelter and the kindly tree opens itself up to take the prince inside and closes immediately. The life of the prince is saved. Today it seems that fairy tale was a mighty metaphor. The prince represents the human civilisation today. The demon of pollution is bent on devouring it up. The only hope for the survival of humanity lies in seeking a safe refuge with the tree.

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Environment Gets A Helping Hand From Philanthropists

The Paris climate agreement, adopted by almost 200 nations in 2015, set a goal of limiting warming to "well below" a rise of 2 degrees Celsius.

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Scattered trees dot the once densely forested land, seen from an airplane, in South Sudan. VOA

Leading philanthropists pledged hundreds of millions of dollars to rescue shrinking tropical forests that suck heat-trapping carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, on the eve of a global climate change summit in San Francisco.

Nine foundations announced the $459 million commitment, to be delivered over the next four years, a day ahead of the Global Climate Action Summit, which is expected to draw about 4,500 delegates from city and regional governments.

“While the world heats up, many of our governments have been slow — slow to act. And so we in philanthropy must step up,” Darren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation, told journalists at an event announcing the pledge.

The commitment roughly doubles the funds the groups currently dedicate to forest protection, said David Kaimowitz, a director at the Ford Foundation, one of the donors.

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The Lonar Lake is an exceptional ‘bowl of biodiversity’ and a wildlife sanctuary. Wikimedia Commons

Charlotte Streck, director of Amsterdam-based think tank Climate Focus, said the size of the commitment makes the groups major players in supporting anti-deforestation programs.

Norway has led donor efforts by pledging up to $500 million a year to help tropical nations protect their forests, Streck said.

But the new money committed by foundations could prove more “flexible and nimble” than money from governments, she said.

“The money that has been pledged by the governments like Norway and Germany, the UK, sits mostly in trust funds with the World Bank and the U.N. and it doesn’t get out so quickly,” she said.

Often “there is $20,000 missing here or $50,000 missing here, just to do one thing or develop one study or work with one person or have one consultation — and that the foundations can do,” Streck said.

Other groups that are part of the new initiative include the MacArthur Foundation and The Rockefeller Foundation.

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Climate Change Fuels California Fires. Flickr

Help for indigenous people

Funds will mostly assist indigenous people who are forest dwellers, including by helping them secure titles to land they live on so it cannot be sold to private companies without their agreement, said Walker.

“Companies come to our village, our forests and say: ‘You have to leave because I have the license from the government,'” said Rukka Sombolinggi, who heads the Indonesia-based Indigenous People’s Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN).

The world loses the equivalent of 50 soccer fields’ worth of forest every minute, organizers said.

Yet forests absorb a third of the annual planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions produced — and those emissions need to be slashed substantially more to meet the goals set in the Paris agreement.

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The Mangroves of Sunderbans Forests. Wikimedia

The Paris climate agreement, adopted by almost 200 nations in 2015, set a goal of limiting warming to “well below” a rise of 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times while “pursuing efforts” for the tougher goal of 1.5 degrees C.

Also Read: IWC Shuts Down A Proposal To Create a Sanctuary For South Atlantic Whales

The three-day Global Climate Action Summit was organized by Californian authorities and the United Nations to support the leadership of mayors, governors and other sub-national authorities in curbing climate change. (VOA)