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Trump’s ‘Muslim ban’ disqualifies him from being president: White House

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Washington: Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump’s statement calling for a temporary ban on all Muslims from entering the United States drew flak from White House on Tuesday.

White House press secretary Josh Earnest said that Trump’s remarks in this regard disqualifies from being president.

“The fact is what Donald Trump said yesterday disqualifies him from serving as president,” Earnest said in Tuesday’s press briefing.

Earnest said that every president is required to take an oath to “preserve, protect and defend the US Constitution, and his statement disqualifies Trump from being president.

Trump sent shock waves through the political establishment on Monday with a call to bar Muslims from entering the US until lawmakers figure out what is going on.

“Donald J. Trump is calling for a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country’s representatives can figure out what is going on,” a campaign press release said.

Trump, who has previously called for surveillance against mosques and said he was open to establishing a database for all Muslims living in the US, made his controversial call in the wake of last week’s mass shooting in California by a Pakistani-origin couple.

Republican candidate Ben Carson called Trump’s proposal seeking ban on Muslims unconstitutional.

“It’s just not who we are,” said Carson. “We are not a people who react in a fearful way. You know, when you talk about prejudice, prejudice is usually born out of fear and ignorance. That’s not who we are… We do not discriminate on people based on religion — that’s constitutional, that’s in the First Amendment, so we would never want to do that.

However, at the same time he said that all visitors to the US should register and be monitored.

“Anybody who’s going to be coming to our country — we need to know why they’re coming,” Carson said.

(With inputs from agencies)

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Google Gave Notice of it’s First Private Transatlantic Subsea Cable Project

Google picked undersea communications technology firm TE SubCom to design, manufacture and lay the cable for Dunant

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Google earlier became the first major non-telecom company to build a private intercontinental cable with its investment in the Curie cable. Pixabay

 In line with its global Cloud infrastructure expansion plans, Google has revealed its first private transAtlantic subsea cable project designed to bring high-bandwidth, low-latency and highly secure Cloud connections between the US and Europe.

Named Dunant, after Henri Dunant, the first Nobel Peace Prize winner and founder of the Red Cross, the cable is expected to become available in late 2020, Google’s Strategic Negotiator Jayne Stowell wrote in a blog post on Tuesday.

Google picked undersea communications technology firm TE SubCom to design, manufacture and lay the cable for Dunant.

“This cable crosses the Atlantic Ocean from Virginia Beach in the US to the French Atlantic coast, and will expand our network – already the world’s largest — to help us better serve our users and customers,” Stowell said.

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Google unveils first private subsea cable project. Pixabay

Google earlier became the first major non-telecom company to build a private intercontinental cable with its investment in the Curie cable.

“Cables are often built to serve a very specific route. When we build privately, we can choose this route based on what will provide the lowest latency for the largest segment of customers,” Stowell said while offering the rationale behind the decision to build Dunant privately.

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“In this case, we wanted connectivity across the Atlantic that was close to certain data centres, but the reasons could also include the ability to land in certain countries, or to connect two places that were previously underserved, such as was the case with Curie,” Stowell added.

Google also took into consideration factors such as capacity and bandwidth for the decision. (IANS)