Thursday March 21, 2019
Home India Turkish Forei...

Turkish Foreign Minister says FETO, mastermind of coup has ‘infiltrated’ India

He says that the “secretive transnational criminal network”, FETO which is present around the world, has infiltrated India through associations and schools

0
//
Sushma Swaraj with Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu in New Delhi on Friday Image Source: The Hindu
  • The Minister says that the “secretive transnational criminal network”, FETO which is present around the world, has infiltrated India through associations and schools
  • On July 15, the clandestine faction led by FETO within the Turkish Army attempted to stage a coup to overthrow the democratically elected government
  • The minister also expressed concern over the situation in Syria as Turkey is directly impacted by the conflict there and violence in the region

August 22,2016: During his first official visit to India, Mr. Mevlut Cavusoglu, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Turkey claims that Fethullah Gulen Terrorist Organisation (FETO), blamed for the failed coup to topple President Tayyip Erdogan in Turkey, has “infiltrated” India.

He says that the “secretive transnational criminal network”, FETO which is present around the world, has infiltrated India through associations and schools.

“In all countries where FETO has a presence, we ask them to take immediate actions to remove them from their territories,” said the minister to PTI.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

After holding talks with Sushma Swaraj, the Turkish Foreign Minister said in an interview with PTI, “I have already taken up this issue with my counterpart.”

According to the PTI report, External Affairs Ministry Spokesperson Vikas Swarup said the Indian side is “sensitive” to Turkish concerns and Indian security agencies were “looking into” Ankara’s demand for closure of associations connected with FETO which were carrying out illegal activities.

Crowds cheers for Erdogan after unsuccesful military coup attempt. Image Source: www.voanews.com
Crowds cheers for Erdogan after unsuccesful military coup attempt. Image Source: www.voanews.com
  • On July 15, the clandestine faction led by FETO within the Turkish Army attempted to stage a coup to overthrow the democratically elected government.
  • More than 240 people died and over 1,500 others were injured as fallout of the failed coup.
  • The President of Turkey, Erdogan had blamed US-based cleric Gulen, who currently lives in self-imposed exile in the US, for the attempted coup last month.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

“We appreciate the prompt support to our democratically elected government by my Indian counterpart, External Affairs Minister Swaraj,” the minister added.

The minister also expressed concern over the situation in Syria as Turkey is directly impacted by the conflict there and violence in the region.

He said that the much-needed political transition in Syria is only possible if the international community works together. He also added that it is not only a prerequisite to end the conflict, but also essential to fight terrorism.

As sharing information and cooperating to eliminate all forms and manifestations of terrorism is important to eliminate the threat both the countries face, Cavusoglu said, “Therefore, exchange of information regarding these threats and bilateral and multilateral cooperation and solidarity against terrorism is crucial.”

– prepared by Ajay Krishna of NewsGram. Twitter: @ajkrish14

ALSO READ:

Next Story

Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

0
water
Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

water
Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

water
Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)