Monday August 20, 2018
Home India TV actor Sanj...

TV actor Sanjit Bedi passes away

0
//
109
fitnhit.com
Republish
Reprint
indianexpress.com
indianexpress.com

New Delhi: TV actor Sanjit Bedi, who won million of hearts through his character Dr Omi of TV show “Sanjeevani”, died on Wednesday morning due to a viral condition of the brain, his friend and actor Karanvir Bohra said.

Karanvir, who featured with the deceased in TV series “Kasautii Zindagii Kay”, said Sanjit had been in hospital for the last one-and-half months and was battling with his condition for quite some time.

“He was in the ICU of Bombay Hospital here for the past one-and-half months. He had a brain virus for the last year-and-a-half. He breathed his last this morning and his cremation was performed in the afternoon,” Karanvir told IANS over phone from Mumbai.

Sanjit appeared in a slew of shows like “Jaane Kya Baat Hui”, “Thodi Si Zameen Thoda Sa Aasman” and “Kyaa Hoga Nimmo Kaa”, among others. However, the actor was missing from the scene for quite some time. Sanjit, in his late 30s, is survived by his wife.

Karanvir, who is currently seen in “Qubool Hai”, recalled how they found friendship on the sets of TV show “Kasautii Zindagii Kay”.

“We got to know each other from ‘Kasautii…’ and we came really close. We were in touch since then. The man was full of life,” he said.

Karanvir also feels a void has been created in his life and he will take very long to come to terms with the loss.

“Imagining him to be silent and not being there will be weird,” he said.

Karanvir said, “Sanjit went abroad for some work and after he came back he started practising yoga.”

(IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

A Vaccine Against Pneumonia And Meningitis Saves Million Children

"far too many deaths , about 900 every day, are still being caused by these two infections."

0
A child receives a meningitis vaccination at the community center in Al Neem camp for Internally Displaced People in El Daein, East Darfur, Oct. 8, 2012.
A child receives a meningitis vaccination at the community center in Al Neem camp for Internally Displaced People in El Daein, East Darfur, Oct. 8, 2012. VOA

A vaccine against bacterial pneumonia and another against meningitis have saved 1.45 million children’s lives this century, according to a new study.

The diseases the vaccines prevent are now concentrated in a handful of countries where the medications are not yet widely available or were only recently introduced, the research says.

Pneumonia is the leading cause of death among children worldwide. The bacteria targeted by the shots, Haemophilus influenzae type b (known as Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), are major causes of pneumonia and also cause meningitis. Together, the two bacteria claimed nearly 1.1 million lives in 2000, before the vaccines were widely available, according to the World Health Organization.

Vaccines against the bacteria are not new, but funding to provide them in low-income countries only became available recently.

A baby with parents
A baby with parents, Pixabay

To estimate their impact, the researchers started with country-by-country data from the WHO on pneumonia and meningitis cases and deaths, as well as vaccine coverage estimates. They factored in data from dozens of clinical studies on infections caused by the two bacteria to create estimates of illness and death from the diseases in 2000 and 2015.

They found deaths from Hib fell by 90 percent in 2015, saving an estimated 1.2 million lives since 2000. Pneumococcus deaths fell by just over half, accounting for approximately 250,000 lives saved.

The research appears in the journal The Lancet Global Health.

“What was interesting was to see the rate at which some of these deaths have been prevented in the last several years,” said lead author Brian Wahl at Johns Hopkins University, “largely due to the availability of funding for these vaccines in countries with some of the highest burdens [of disease].”

The study estimates that 95 percent of the reduction in pneumococcal deaths occurred after 2010, when 52 low- and middle-income countries began receiving funding from Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance, to introduce the vaccine into their national immunization programs.

“The good news is that the numbers are moving in the right direction,” wrote Cynthia Whitney at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in an accompanying editorial.

Pneumonia in child
Pneumonia in child, flickr

However, Whitney added, “far too many deaths — about 900 every day — are still being caused by these two infections.”

She notes that more than 40 percent of the world’s children live in countries where pneumococcal vaccine is not a routine childhood immunization.

Many of the countries with the largest number of deaths from these two bacteria have recently introduced the vaccines, but coverage is uneven.

India, Nigeria, China and South Sudan had the highest rates of death from Hib, the study says. All but China have introduced the vaccine in the past few years.

Half of the world’s pneumococcal deaths occurred in just four countries: India, Nigeria, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Pakistan. All have recently introduced the vaccine, though in India it is a routine immunization in only three states.

Also read:AI tool accelerate diagnosis eye diseases

Lowering the global burden of these diseases will depend on improving coverage in these countries, the study says. (VOA)