Monday September 23, 2019
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Two Indo-Canadians to be tried for murder

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Toronto: Two Indo-Canadians Gurjinder and Gursimar, who were under the charge of 1st-degree murder and manslaughter would be on the trial period from March 1, said a media report.

According to a report in The Link newspaper on Sunday, Gurjinder ‘’Gary’’ Dhaliwal is under the charge of 1st-degree murder of Maple Batalia while Gursimar was charged with manslaughter with a firearm.

19 years-old Batalia was shot at Surrey Simon Fraser University on 28th October 2011. Batalia was dating Dhaliwal same time, who was charged with her murder along with his co-accused Bedi in 2012.

Batalia’s family raised more than $50,000 for an endowment in her name, to help female students enrolled in Simon Fraser University’s health sciences programme, the report said.(IANS)

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3 Billion Fewer Birds in United States, Canada and Mexico than 1970

A report in the journal Science says there are 3 billion fewer birds in the United States, Canada and Mexico than 1970 — a 29% drop

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Birds, United States, Canada
FILE - A western meadowlark sings in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colo., April 14, 2019. According to a study, there are 3 billion fewer wild birds in North America than in 1970. VOA

If the skies above North America seem quieter, it’s because of the massive drop in the bird population in the past 50 years. Birds.

A report in the journal Science says there are 3 billion fewer birds in the United States, Canada and Mexico than 1970 — a 29% drop.

Conservationists call it a widespread ecological crisis.

“One of the scary things about the results is that it is happening right under our eyes. We might not even notice it until it is too late,” lead author of the study Kenneth Rosenberg of Cornell University says.

Birds, United States, Canada

If the skies above North America seem quieter, it’s because of the massive drop in the bird population in the past 50 years. Pixabay

More than 90% of the losses were among 12 species with the common house sparrow at the top of the list.

The experts blame the disappearance of natural meadows and grasslands in favor of farmland for the drop.

They also say pesticides are killing the insects that many birds use for food.

“We see fields of corn and other crops right up to the horizon. Everything is sanitized and mechanized. There’s no room left for birds, fauna, and nature,” Rosenberg said.

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The study also cites free-roaming domestic cats and birds slamming into windows that reflect the sky.

But the study says the duck and goose population has actually grown since 1970 because of less hunting and more protective measures.

Ornithologists say the drop in bird populations can be reversed by simple measures including keeping pet cats inside, window treatments that can prevent birds flying into them, and avoiding pesticides and insecticides. (VOA)