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Two New Viruses Stealing Data, Quick Heal Reports

The security researchers recommended Android users to avoid downloading apps

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Two new sophisticated Android Banking trojan viruses are exploiting mobile users’ behaviour in India to gain access to their confidential data, global IT security firm Quick Heal warned on Tuesday.

Security experts at Quick Heal Security Labs have detected “Android.Marcher.C” and “Android.Asacub.T” — the two trojans that imitate notifications from popular social applications such as WhatsApp, Facebook, Skype, Instagram and Twitter as well as some of the leading banking apps in India.

By gaining access to incoming messages through administrative privileges, these malware also allow hackers to bypass the two-factor OTP authentication typically used for securing online transactions in India, the researchers warned.

“Indian users often download unverified apps from third-party app stores and links sent through SMS and email. This gives hackers a lucrative opportunity to steal confidential information from unsuspecting users,” said Sanjay Katkar, Co-founder and CTO, Quick Heal Technologies Limited.

“The fact that we’ve detected three similar malware in less than six months indicates that hackers are now targeting mobile users, who are far more vulnerable to sophisticated phishing attacks,” he added.

Anti-virus firewall
Anti-virus firewall, Pixabay

While “Android.Marcher.C” uses the Adobe Flash Player icon to look like a genuine app, “Android.Asacub.T” mimics an Android Update icon.

Whenever users access an app on the database of these malware, they are tricked into entering sensitive information such as banking credentials, card details, and login IDs/passwords before they can continue using the app.

This is not the first time that Quick Heal Security Labs has detected such a malware.

The researchers previously raised an alert in January this year about a similar Android Banking Trojan.

Known as “Android.banker.A2f8a”, the malware was distributed through a fake Flash Player on third-party app stores and mimicked more than 232 banking and cryptocurrency apps.

The security researchers have recommended Android users to avoid downloading apps through third-party app stores or through links provided in SMS and email.

“Always keep ‘Unknown Sources’ disabled, and verify app permissions before installing any app from official stores,” the security firm said.

Also read: Hacker who passed US military data to IS arrested

Users must also keep their Google Play Protect service always ‘ON’ and install a reliable mobile security app to detect and block fake/malicious apps, it added.(IANS)

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83% Online Users Think Their Own, Weak Passwords: Cybersecurity Researchers

Passwords should be hard to crack and confidential

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A report suggests that 83 per cent of online users think up their own weak passwords. Pixabay

Highlighting the need for storing passwords, cybersecurity researchers have found that that 83 per cent of online users are thinking up their own, weak passwords, while 54 per cent say they are unaware about how to check if any of their credentials have already been leaked.

Passwords are the most common method of authentication, but they only work if they are hard to crack and confidential.

With an increasing number of apps requiring them, it can be hard to come up with new ideas for complex passwords and keep them all in your mind � especially when users may be required to change their passwords regularly, according to a Kaspersky report.

“In addition to this challenge of creativity for users, it’s becoming more vital to store passwords securely and look out for possible instances when these credentials could be leaked,” said the report.

According to the findings, 55 per cent of users claim they remember all of their passwords – which can be difficult if security requirements such as password complexity and uniqueness are to be satisfied.

Passwords
According to the findings, 55 per cent of users claim they remember all of their passwords. Pixabay

One in five (19 per cent) keep them written in a file or document stored on their computer, while 18 per cent use the browsers on their computers, smartphones, or tablets to store their passwords.

“Consumers can monitor the spread of personal data, including which passwords might have been leaked. And this is not only for the sake of “just being aware”; it also allows individuals to take the right action to minimize any invasion of privacy,” said Marina Titova, Head of Consumer Product Marketing at Kaspersky.

There are some ways to check if your password has been leaked.

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For instance, services such as �Have I Been Pwned?’ maintain a database where users can check if their passwords have been included in public leaks or data breaches without visiting the sketchier parts of the web.

“Minimise the number of people you share account login information with and never leave passwords where others might find them � be it on paper or on a device. Keeping them on sticky notes or a pad might be tempting, but it will also be just as easy for others to access things you don’t want them to,” said the researchers.

Use strong and robust passwords generated by a reliable security solution, said Kaspersky. (IANS)

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Realme Global User Base Reaches 3.5 Crore, 2.1 crore in India Alone

Realme hits 3.5 crore user base worldwide

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Realme
Chinese smartphone Company Realme announced that it has 3.5 crore users worldwide on Thursday. Wikimedia Commons

Chinese smartphone manufacturer Realme on Thursday announced it now has 3.5 crore users worldwide, out of which 2.1 crore users are in India alone.

According to the company, it has created more than 7,500 direct jobs in India and will expand it to 10,000 by the end of this year.

At January-end, realme’s global user base reached 2.5 crore, and the company added another 1 crore users worldwide in the next 4 months.

Compared with the performance in Q1 2019, company’s global smartphone shipments increased by 157 per cent year-on-year, ranking the first in the world, according to Counterpoint Research.

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Realme became the top 7th global smartphone brand for the first time in the third quarter of 2019. Wikimedia Commons

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Realme became the top 7th global smartphone brand for the first time in the third quarter of 2019 and continued its previous global ranking of Top 7 in the world in Q1 2020.

Realme said it will soon achieve monthly capacity of 3.5 million handset production at the Greater Noida plant.

The smartphone brand has already entered 27 markets around the world in only two years, including China, Europe, India, Southeast Asia and South Asia, Russia and Africa, and has ranked among the top five in multiple markets. (IANS)

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Instagram Fixes Glitch Showing Super Long Images to Users

The photo-sharing app has a fixed the glitch

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Instagram has fixed the glitch. Pixabay

Facebook-owned Instagram has fixed a glitch that allowed people post extra-long images onto their feeds.

The photo-sharing app has a fixed size for pictures and a fixed pattern about how they appear on your screen but because of the bug, Instagram could not resize the images.

These were not visible to all the users around the globe but only in the iOS version of the app.

Android users were not able to reproduce this glitch in the app. However, they could post normal-sized images after clicking them but their feed did show some extra-long pictures clicked by the iPhone users on the app.

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Instagram told The Verge that they were aware of the bug. Pixabay

Acknowledging the bug, Facebook that owns the photo-sharing app told The Verge that they were aware of the bug.

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“We are aware of a bug involving oversized photos on Instagram. We’re working quickly to fix the issue,” a Facebook spokesperson was quoted as saying.

As for the people who were able to post such long pictures, they reported that the app did not give them an option to crop an image when they tried posting content on the app. (IANS)