Wednesday February 20, 2019
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Uber provides free lifts to women voting first time in Saudi Arabia

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New Delhi: Uber, the online taxi service is offering free rides to women in Saudi Arabia as the nation sees the women voting first time in the elections.

Saudi Arabia, a conservative Islamic country has allowed women to vote and contest elections the first time in their history. Uber, in a bid to help the women participation in the ongoing election, decided to provide free lifts for all the women who are going to vote.

The women are also not allowed to drive in the nation or talk to a man.

This is a joint effort between US-based Uber and Al-Nahda Philanthropic Society for Women, a Saudi women’s empowerment group.

The campaign is a part of Nahda’s wider struggle for gender equality and rights for women in the country.

Saudi Arabia is the last country to allow women to vote except for the Vatican City now. This is a first step in the long struggle of the gender equality.

Almost 1000 candidates for the elections are women which prove that they were just waiting for the opportunity.  This initiative is a way to tell women that there will be a help if they needed it.

However, a number of women said that they wouldn’t use Uber rather they would go polling booths with their family members.

This election which are a milestone step for the women in the history of Saudi Arabia and the Middle east can be an even bigger thing if somehow any women candidate manages to win.

More women voices are likely to be heard if they get representation in the decision making through the electoral process.

Uber and Nahda are hoping that their initiative encourages more women to participate in this elections.

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Diet Drinks Increase Stroke Chances in Postmenopausal Women

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. 

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The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. Pixabay

Are diet drinks your choice? Beware, your heart could be at risk. A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say.

The stroke is was caused by a blocked artery, especially small arteries.

The study, published in the journal Stroke, showed that compared with women who consumed diet drinks less than once a week or not at all, women who consumed two or more artificially sweetened beverages per day were 23 per cent more likely to have a stroke, 31 per cent more likely to have ischemic stroke, and 29 per cent were at risk of developing heart disease (fatal or non-fatal heart attack).

In addition, there was a 16 per cent risk of deaths from any cause.

 

 

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A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say. Pixabay

Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes, findings revealed.

“Many well-meaning people, especially those who are overweight or obese, drink low-calorie sweetened drinks to cut calories in their diet. Our research and other observational studies have shown that artificially-sweetened beverages may not be harmless and high consumption is associated with a higher risk of stroke and heart disease,” said lead author Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Associate Professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the US.

For the study, researchers included 81,714 post-menopausal women aged 50-79 years.

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women.

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Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes. Pixabay

Also Read: Top 3 Factors That Play a Major Role in Fertility Issues in Women

“The American Heart Association suggests water as the best choice for a no-calorie beverage,” suggested Rachel K. Johnson, Professor at the University of Vermont in the US.

“Since long-term clinical trial data are not available on the effects of low-calorie sweetened drinks and cardiovascular health, given their lack of nutritional value, it may be prudent to limit their prolonged use,” Johnson added. (IANS)