Friday July 20, 2018
Home Uncategorized Uighur Muslim...

Uighur Muslims banned from observing Ramadan

0
//
90
Republish
Reprint

NewsGram Staff Writer

As the Muslim community across is observing the holy month of Ramadan, China, in a scandalous move, has banned the festival in parts of the far western Xinjiang district for Muslim inhabitants.

Xinjiang is home to Uighur Muslims, who have been asked not to fast during Ramadan.

Ramadan is the holiest month of the year for Muslims around the world, which involves fasting from dawn to dusk and offering prayers and reading the Quran for a month.

As per media reports, in some particular restive areas in Xinjiang, officials have been asked to give assurances, orally and in writing, “guaranteeing they have no faith, will not attend religious activities and will lead the way in not fasting over Ramadan”.

Other than putting a ban on fasting, China has also ordered halal restaurants to remain open during the day. Shops selling cigarettes and alcohol have also been asked either to continue their sale throughout the day or to remain shut down altogether.

Chinese authorities have often blamed Uighurs Muslims, whom they label as “religious extremists”, allegedly for being part of terrorist attacks in the recent years. But the group has always denied any kind of involvement in terrorist activities.

However China’s attempt to stoke religious sentiments might trigger further violence.

The Uighur leader, Dilxat Raxit, was reported as saying, “The faith of the Uighurs has been highly politicised and the increase in controls could cause sharp resistance.”

In January 2015, the Chinese authorities in Xinjiang province had passed a law, prohibiting residents from wearing burqas in public.

The state media reported that earlier in August 2014, another city in Xinjiang banned people wearing Islamic-style clothing and large beards from riding public buses during a provincial sporting event.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

War against terror is fight between moderates, extremists: Jordanian King

The Jordanian King arrived here on Tuesday on a three-day state visit. Earlier this month, King Abdullah had hosted Modi in Amman.

0
War against terror is fight between moderates, extremists: Jordanian King, Abdullah II. Wikimedia commons
War against terror is fight between moderates, extremists: Jordanian King, Abdullah II. Wikimedia Commons
  • Jordanian King Abdullah II said that war against terrorism is not a fight between religions
  • He says that it is between moderates and extremists
  • The king also targets media which portrays terrorism in a wrong way

Visiting Jordanian King Abdullah II on Thursday said that the global war against terror was not a fight between different religions but between moderates and extremists.

King abdullah said terrorism is not about fight between religions. Wikimedia Commons
King Abdullah said terrorism is not about the fight between religions. Wikimedia Commons

“Today’s global war against terror is not a fight between different religions or people. It is between moderates of all faiths and communities against extremism, hate and violence,” the King said while addressing a conference on ‘Islamic Heritage: Promoting Understanding and Moderation’ here in the presence of Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

“What is heard in the news and what is shown about religion is what separates people,” he said.

He added that around the world, suspicions are inflamed by what different groups don’t know about others.

“Such ideologies of hate distort the word of God — to stir up conflicts and justify crimes and terror.

“We need to take these things seriously…they should never be allowed to distract us from the truth that faith should draw humanity together.”

Also Read: Documentary ‘Salam Neighbor’ shows Daily Life of Syrian Refugees in Jordan

He said faith inspires countries like India and Jordan where different religious and ethnic groups have lived together.

“It is faith that brings together different civilisations together.

Modi visited Amman a weeks ago. Wikimedia Commons
Modi visited Amman a weeks ago. Wikimedia Commons

Compassion, mercy, tolerance are values shared by billions of Muslims and non-Muslims around the world.”

“These values put us together to act for our coming future,” he said.

The Jordanian King arrived here on Tuesday on a three-day state visit. Earlier this month, King Abdullah had hosted Modi in Amman. IANS