Wednesday December 19, 2018
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UK Immigration Policy: Indians to feel the brunt of the new ebbing law

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By Gaurav Sharma

Immigration is a natural part of any open economy in the globalized world. Developed nations such as the United States, the United Kingdom, countries in the European Union are the most favored destinations for emigrants from developing nations such as India, China etc.

The Immigration policy which grants freedom of movement to targeted individuals produces a net economic gain for the host nation.

Keeping in view the benefits that such a brain drain entail, developed nations have welcomed bright, young talent from the developing shores to oil the wheels of the economy, particularly the field of Information Technology and the Medical arena.

Lately, however, the same nations which welcomed immigrants with arms wide open, have become skeptical of allowing open access to foreign workers.

In an apparent attempt to crack down on immigration by ‘tens of thousands’, UK Prime Minister David Cameron announced a new immigration task force.

On the back of highest net migration figures in ten years, Cameron has recently announced a blueprint for restriction of professionals from India and other non-European Union nations. Furthermore, new curbs on Inter-Company transfers(ICT) visa used by Indian companies to transfer and post employees in Britain, have also been initiated.

In order to actualize the aforementioned vision to diminish immigration, Migration Advisory Committee(MAC), an integral substratum of the Immigration Taskforce, has been established.

Justifying his move to trample down on immigration, Cameron said, “This government is on the side of working people: in the past, it has been too easy for businesses to recruit from overseas, undermining those who want to work hard and do the right thing.”

Here is what MAC is precisely set-up for:

  • Reducing work visas to highly specialized experts and genuine skill shortages

  • Skills levy on skilled work visas(Tier 2)

  • Setting a time limit for a sector to claim skill shortage

  • Raising salary threshold to prevent businesses from using foreign workers to cut wages

The measures to curtail foreign immigration do not end there. Even the spouses of Indians coming to India with a legitimate work permit may be barred from working in Britain.

Since the announcement of such a sharp strategic move, the major rise in employment- a staggering 1,000 jobs every day- has been appropriated by British nationals.

The measures, undoubtedly, mark the epoch of job usurpation by British nationals.

However, what spells gold-rush for the British nationals is detrimental to the freedom of immigrants, particularly Indian migrants.

Under Article 13 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, every individual irrespective of the nation he is born in, has the right to freedom of movement.

Such restrictive immigration policies can easily be contended as violating the basic human right of freedom of movement promulgated by the United Nations.

At the same time, every country has the right to frame its own border controls and policies, keeping in mind the welfare of its own citizens and, as a corollary, its own vested interests.

Though the immigration debate cannot be settled purely as a ‘for’ or ‘against’ migration policy, one thing is quite certain; the hopeful emigrants dreaming for a better life in foreign shores, have been hit rather hard.

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As Climate Talks Come to a Halt, Africa Suffers From Global Warming

The World Health Organization warns that climate change will exacerbate the impact of some disease and health problems.

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Drought, Climate change, global warming
A farmer stands on cracked earth that three weeks earlier created the bottom of a reservoir on his farm, in Groot Marico, South Africa. VOA

Efforts to boost global action against climate change are stuttering, as several key nations have objected to a key United Nations-backed report on the impacts of rising temperatures at the COP24 talks in Poland.

Many developing nations say they are already suffering from the impact of climate change, especially in south Asia and Africa, where water shortages and intense storms are putting lives and livelihoods in danger.

In Malawi in southern Africa, a bustling fish market stood at Kachulu on the shores of Lake Chilwa just five months ago. Now, hundreds of fishing boats lie marooned across the vast bay as vultures circle over the cracked, sun-baked mud. Water levels here fluctuate annually, but scientists say climate change is making the seasonal dry-out of the lake far more dramatic. Fishermen are being forced to leave and look for work elsewhere, says Sosten Chiotha, of the non-governmental organization ‘LEAD’ – Leadership for Environment and Development.

“Climate change contributes to the current recessions that we are experiencing, because you can see that in 2012 there was a recession where the lake lost about 80 percent of its water. Then it recovered in 2013, but not fully. So since then every year we have been experiencing these recessions,” Chiotha said.

Scientists gathering at the COP24 climate talks say it is developing countries like Malawi that are being hit hardest by the impacts of climate change.

The charity Water Aid has released a report ranking the countries worst-hit by water shortages, with Sudan, Niger and Pakistan making up the top three.

“There are people who are living with the impact of climate change right now. And they’re feeling those impacts not through carbon, but through water. And as we’ve seen over the past few years and will continue to see for many years to come unfortunately, is a huge increase in water stress and absolute water scarcity,” Water Aid’s Jonathan Farr told VOA from the climate talks currently underway in the Polish city of Katowice.

Richer nations have pledged $100 billion a year for poorer nations to deal with the consequences of climate change. Water Aid says they are failing to deliver the money.

Scientists say emissions of carbon dioxide would have to be reduced by 45 percent by 2030 to have any hope of keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius – the target agreed in the Paris climate deal.

 

 

Global Warming, Climate Change, Africa
Climate activists attend the March for Climate in a protest against global warming in Katowice, Poland, Dec. 8, 2018, as the COP24 UN Climate Change Conference takes place in the city. VOA

However, the number of coal-fired power stations – the most polluting for

m of energy generation – is growing. The German organization ‘Urgewald’ calculates that $478 billion had been invested into expansion of the coal industry between January 2016 and September 2018.

Also Read: To Help Poor Countries Adapt To Global Warming, World Bank Doubles Its Funding

Meanwhile the World Health Organization warns that climate change will exacerbate the impact of some disease and health problems, including malaria, malnutrition and heat exposure.

Also Read: To Help Poor Countries Adapt To Global Warming, World Bank Doubles Its Funding

There is little optimism at the talks that much concrete progress will be made, as several countries including the United States, Russia and Saudi Arabia have already voiced objections to a key scientific report from the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (VOA)