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Under Trump’s Rule, Women Will Lose Birth Control Coverage: Judge

The states argue that millions of women could lose free birth control services under the new rules.

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birth control, contraceptive, women
A one-month dosage of hormonal birth control pills is displayed in Sacramento, Calif. VOA

A “substantial number” of women would lose free birth control coverage under new rules by the Trump administration that allow more employers to opt out of providing the benefit, a U.S. judge said at a hearing Friday.

Judge Haywood Gilliam appeared inclined to grant a request by California and other states that he block the rules while the states’ lawsuit moves forward. He said he would rule before Monday, when the rules are set to take effect.

The changes would allow more employers, including publicly traded companies, to opt out of providing no-cost contraceptive coverage to women by claiming religious objections. Some private employers could also object on moral grounds.

Gilliam said the new rules would be a “massive policy shift” to women who lose coverage.

Women, Birth Control
Margot Riphagen of New Orleans, La., wears a birth control pills costume during a protest in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, March 25, 2015. VOA

The judge previously blocked an interim version of those rules — a decision that was upheld in December by an appeals court.

The case is before him again after the administration finalized the measures in November, prompting a renewed legal challenge by California and other states.

At issue is a requirement under President Barack Obama’s health care law that birth control services be covered at no additional cost. Obama officials included exemptions for religious organizations. The Trump administration expanded those exemptions and added “moral convictions” as a basis to opt out of providing birth control services.

Karli Eisenberg, an attorney for California, told Gilliam on Friday the loss of free contraceptive coverage from employers would force women to turn to government programs that provide birth control, and if they are ineligible for those, increase the risk of unintended pregnancies.

“It’s undisputed that these rules will create barriers,” she said.

Reproductive Rights, abortion, women, birth control
A community health worker holds up contraceptives during a lecture on family planning at a reproductive health clinic run by an NGO in Tondo city, metro Manila. VOA

The rules violate the Affordable Care Act, including a provision that forbids discrimination, she said.

Justin Sandberg, an attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice, said the health care law already had exemptions for contraceptive coverage that left millions of women without the benefit. He said the birth control requirement was a “substantial burden” on employers with religious objections.

The rules “protect a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objectors from being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs,” the U.S. Department of Justice said in court documents.

Also Read: Trump Can’t Deny Birth Control Coverage: U.S. Court

The states argue that millions of women could lose free birth control services under the new rules. They want Gilliam to issue a preliminary injunction blocking the rules for the entire nation.

Gilliam questioned whether a nationwide injunction was appropriate. He noted that a federal judge in Massachusetts had ruled against a similar challenge to the birth control rules, but a nationwide injunction would nonetheless block them in that state. (VOA)

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Here’s How Porn Ruins Women’s Intimate Experiences with Men

The researchers reported that while most women in the study sample had seen pornography, fewer than half used it for masturbation

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Some people linked 'porn ban' to the right-wing politics of BJP. Wikimedia Commons
Some people linked 'porn ban' to the right-wing politics of BJP. Wikimedia Commons

Consuming porn instigates body-related insecurities in women that might not only reduce their interest in engaging in intimate activities with their partners but also negatively affect their arousal, a study suggests.

Researchers have explored the association between pornography and intimate partner experiences among heterosexual women and revealed that there was a complex relationship between the two.

Published in the Journal of Women’s Health, the study reveals that thinking of pornographic material during intimate experiences with a heterosexual partner among women minght give rise to insecurities about appearances and thus reduces the enjoyment of the intimate acts.

For the findings, the research team surveyed 706 heterosexual women aged 18-29 in the US, associating the consumption of pornography with sexual preferences, experiences and concerns.

Photo credit: twitter.com

The researchers reported that while most women in the study sample had seen pornography, fewer than half used it for masturbation.

Those women who used it at higher rates for masturbation tended to rely more on pornographic scripts during sex to achieve and maintain arousal and were more likely to prefer pornography to sex with a partner.

Also Read- Unintended Consequences if You Regulate us for The Sake of it: Google CEO Sundar Pichai

“The researchers demonstrate a clear difference between the role of pornography in sexual experiences of women compared to men,” said Susan G Kornstein from Virginia Commonwealth University in the US.

“Whereas the relationship tends to be more direct in young heterosexual men and just viewing pornographic material is associated with reduced sexual intimacy and satisfaction, women make the material part of their personal sexual experience and carry the pornographic script into their intimate partner experiences,” Kornstein said. (IANS)