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Unemployment may up death risk by 50% in heart patients

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Heart Problems. Pixabay
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May 02, 2017: Being unemployed is associated with a 50 percent higher risk of death in patients with heart failure than previously known risk factors such as diabetes or stroke, shows a study.

“The ability to hold a job brings valuable information on well-being and performance status,” said lead author Rasmus Roerth from Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.

On the other hand, being out of work has been associated with increased risk of depression, mental health problems and even suicide.

“In younger patients with heart failure, employment status could be a potential predictor of morbidity and mortality,” Roerth added.

The findings were presented at the Heart Failure 2017 and the 4th World Congress on Acute Heart Failure.

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For the study, the team included all patients of working age (18 to 60 years) with a first hospitalisation for heart failure in Denmark between 1997 and 2012. Of the 21,455 patients with a first hospitalisation for heart failure, 11,880 (55 percent) were part of the workforce at baseline.

During an average follow-up of 1,005 days, 16 per cent of employed and 31 percent of unemployed patients died, while 40 per cent of employed and 42 percent of unemployed patients were re-hospitalised for heart failure.

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After adjusting for age, sex, education level and comorbidities, heart failure patients unemployed at baseline had a 50 percent increased risk of death and 12 percent increased the risk of rehospitalisation for heart failure compared to those who were employed.

Thus, employment status could help to risk stratify young heart failure patients and identify those needing more intensive rehabilitation, the study showed. IANS

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Alcohol May Increase Death Risk in Young TB Patients

According to the researchers, the study could facilitate the development of therapies for alcoholic individuals with latent and active Mtb infections

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For the study, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, young and old mice were fed alcohol or control diets for one month and then infected with MtbH37Rv.
For the study, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, young and old mice were fed alcohol or control diets for one month and then infected with MtbH37Rv. Pixabay

Increased consumption of alcohol in people with tuberculosis (TB) may accelerate their risk of death, scientists led by an Indian-origin researcher have found.

Chronic alcohol consumption modulates a host of immune defense mechanisms and increases susceptibility to infections with various pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) — the TB-causing bacterium.

In the study, the risk was seen in young mice, not in older ones.

It was due to the production of a protein IFN-a — involved in innate immune response against viral infection — in the lungs by a subset of immune cells that express molecules called CD11b and Ly6G, explained researchers, led by Deepak Tripathi of the University of Texas.

For the study, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, young and old mice were fed alcohol or control diets for one month and then infected with MtbH37Rv.

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Alcohol may increase death risk in young tuberculosis patients. Pixabay

The analysis showed that 80 per cent of Mtb-infected alcohol-fed young mice died within 6 months, while the death rate was 25 per cent in Mtb-infected alcohol-fed old mice.

Further, among patients with latent tuberculosis infection, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from young alcoholic individuals produced significantly higher amounts of IFN-a than those from young non-alcoholic, old alcoholic, and old non-alcoholic individuals.

Also Read: Teens Drinking Regularly face Worse Alcohol Problems Than Adults

This suggests that young alcoholic individuals with latent tuberculosis infection have a higher risk of developing active tuberculosis infection.

According to the researchers, the study could facilitate the development of therapies for alcoholic individuals with latent and active Mtb infections. (IANS)

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