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Unemployment may up death risk by 50% in heart patients

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Heart Problems. Pixabay
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May 02, 2017: Being unemployed is associated with a 50 percent higher risk of death in patients with heart failure than previously known risk factors such as diabetes or stroke, shows a study.

“The ability to hold a job brings valuable information on well-being and performance status,” said lead author Rasmus Roerth from Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.

On the other hand, being out of work has been associated with increased risk of depression, mental health problems and even suicide.

“In younger patients with heart failure, employment status could be a potential predictor of morbidity and mortality,” Roerth added.

The findings were presented at the Heart Failure 2017 and the 4th World Congress on Acute Heart Failure.

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For the study, the team included all patients of working age (18 to 60 years) with a first hospitalisation for heart failure in Denmark between 1997 and 2012. Of the 21,455 patients with a first hospitalisation for heart failure, 11,880 (55 percent) were part of the workforce at baseline.

During an average follow-up of 1,005 days, 16 per cent of employed and 31 percent of unemployed patients died, while 40 per cent of employed and 42 percent of unemployed patients were re-hospitalised for heart failure.

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After adjusting for age, sex, education level and comorbidities, heart failure patients unemployed at baseline had a 50 percent increased risk of death and 12 percent increased the risk of rehospitalisation for heart failure compared to those who were employed.

Thus, employment status could help to risk stratify young heart failure patients and identify those needing more intensive rehabilitation, the study showed. IANS

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Epileptic Pregnant Women Often Have Higher Risk of Death

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases affecting approximately sixty million people globally

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Pregnant Women
Risk of death 5 times higher in epileptic pregnant women: Study. Pixabay

The risk of dying during pregnancy is five times higher for pregnant women with epilepsy, finds a new study.

According to the study, from the Aarhus University in Denmark, pregnant women with epilepsy die of virtually the same conditions and events that women without epilepsy die of — ranging from accidents to blood clots, cancer and suicide — although with a greater frequency.

The results should be seen in light of the fact that in general, people with epilepsy have a higher mortality rate than the rest of the population. Overall, for women of childbearing age the mortality rate is 15 times higher, the researchers said.

“We can’t produce statistics on causes of death on the basis of five deceased pregnant women with epilepsy but we can conclude with great statistical certainty that pregnant women with epilepsy die five times more frequently than other pregnant women,” said Jakob Christensen, Associate Professor at the varsity.

For the study, the team examined a total of 2,110,084 pregnancies among which 11,976 (0.6 per cent) were pregnant women with epilepsy and a total of 176 women died during their pregnancy.

Pregnant Women
Lady with her baby. Pixabay

Mortality among women with epilepsy was compared with the mortality rate for women of the same age and social background.

“Although the absolute risk is small, we have to consider how we can follow pregnant women with epilepsy better than today,” Christensen said.

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“… We must take into account that the vast majority of pregnant women with epilepsy receive medication and are closely monitored during pregnancy, and that this probably helps to reduce the overall mortality because close monitoring means that there is better management of their epileptic seizures,” he said.

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases affecting approximately sixty million people globally. (IANS)