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Unemployment may up death risk by 50% in heart patients

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Heart Problems. Pixabay

May 02, 2017: Being unemployed is associated with a 50 percent higher risk of death in patients with heart failure than previously known risk factors such as diabetes or stroke, shows a study.

“The ability to hold a job brings valuable information on well-being and performance status,” said lead author Rasmus Roerth from Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.

On the other hand, being out of work has been associated with increased risk of depression, mental health problems and even suicide.

“In younger patients with heart failure, employment status could be a potential predictor of morbidity and mortality,” Roerth added.

The findings were presented at the Heart Failure 2017 and the 4th World Congress on Acute Heart Failure.

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For the study, the team included all patients of working age (18 to 60 years) with a first hospitalisation for heart failure in Denmark between 1997 and 2012. Of the 21,455 patients with a first hospitalisation for heart failure, 11,880 (55 percent) were part of the workforce at baseline.

During an average follow-up of 1,005 days, 16 per cent of employed and 31 percent of unemployed patients died, while 40 per cent of employed and 42 percent of unemployed patients were re-hospitalised for heart failure.

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After adjusting for age, sex, education level and comorbidities, heart failure patients unemployed at baseline had a 50 percent increased risk of death and 12 percent increased the risk of rehospitalisation for heart failure compared to those who were employed.

Thus, employment status could help to risk stratify young heart failure patients and identify those needing more intensive rehabilitation, the study showed. IANS

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Higher Consumption of Fruits, Vegetables May Lower Death Risk in Dialysis Patients

However, "future studies exploring the potential benefits of a whole dietary approach in the hemodialysis setting are also warranted and we aim to pursue them", noted lead researcher Giovanni Strippoli, Professor from the varsity

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A bowl of fresh fruits a day may lower the risk of developing diabetes by 12 per cent, a study has showed. Pixabay

A higher consumption of fruits and vegetables may be associated with a lower risk of premature death in patients undergoing hemodialysis, finds a new study.

Kidney failure patients on hemodialysis are often discouraged from this type of diet due to its potential to cause a build-up of potassium.

The study showed that although a higher fruit and vegetable intake is linked with lower cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in the general population, its higher consumption is associated with lower all-cause and non-cardiovascular death in the hemodialysis population as well.

For the study, the researchers recruited 8,078 hemodialysis patients.

Green vegetable
Leafy vegetables. Pixabay

The findings, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN), showed that patients who had less than 10 servings of combined fruits and vegetables per week, had 10 per cent lower risks of death from any cause and 12 per cent lower risks of deaths from non-cardiovascular causes.

In addition, those who had more more than 10 servings had a 20 per cent lower risks of death from any cause and 23 per cent lower risks of deaths from non-cardiovascular causes.

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“These findings suggest that well-meaning guidance to limit fruit and vegetable intake to prevent higher dietary potassium load may deprive hemodialysis patients of the potential benefits of these foods. However, intervention trials of fruit and vegetable intake are needed to support dietary recommendations for hemodialysis patients,” said Associate Professor Germaine Wong from the University of Sydney.

However, “future studies exploring the potential benefits of a whole dietary approach in the hemodialysis setting are also warranted and we aim to pursue them”, noted lead researcher Giovanni Strippoli, Professor from the varsity. (IANS)