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Unheard Plight of young girls of North Korea horrifies the gut

North Koreans have been struggling to make things right for themselves by sneaking across the border into China to elude oppression.

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North Korea
Source : Wikimedia

March 30, 2017:

Elucidations by the defectors on Brutality of North Korea

Yeonmi Park, a North Korean defector and human rights activist who eluded to China in 2007 and settled in South Korea in 2009. The young girl fled for her freedom and dissipates the grave reality of North Korean government across the world. The novice was abducted at the time of birth and has been a fraction of oppressed North Koreans. Her family faced starvation after her father was sent to a labor camp for smuggling. They fled to China, where Park and her mother fell into the hands of human traffickers before dodging to Mongolia.

Park rose to global fame after she delivered a speech at the One Young World 2014 Summit in Dublin, Ireland — an annual summit that draws together young people from around the world to build up resolutions to endemic global problems.

Yeonami is now an advocate for sufferers of human trafficking in China due to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and works to uphold human rights in North Korea and around the globe.

When I was four years old, I was warned by my mother not to even whisper. The birds and the mice couldn’t hear me. I admit it, I thought the North Korean dictator could read my mind…At the age of 13, My mother allowed herself to be raped in order to protect me….Death or Dignity, armed with nights we were allowed to kill ourselves. I felt only stars were with us, cited Park in One young world 2014 summit.

Hyeonseo Lee, the author of the famous book, The Girl with Seven Names is the North Korean defector. She eluded from North Korea and succeedingly guided her family to escape from the country from China and Laos. She lived 10 years of secrecy in China and later on escaped to South Korea.

In the 1960s, during the chaotic years of famine and the Cultural Revolution in China, many Chinese people sought refuge in North Korea. Beginning in the late 1990s, the situation was reversed, and North Koreans have been fleeing their oppressive government ever since. The Chinese authorities should remember the hospitality their compatriots received in North Korea and treat desperate escapees with dignity and respect , told Lee Hyeon seo to New York Times.   

Sadistic Background of North Koreans

North Koreans have been struggling to make things right for themselves by sneaking across the border into China to elude oppression. The movements of people tightened after Kim’s death, the cruelty of the government included families living in close proximity to the border areas to take turns standing guard as well as having strong official warnings that three generations of a family would be ruined if caught defecting. The cruelty additionally commands having the defector being executed on the spot.

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Repatriation of defectors by China

China, an ally of North Korea refuses to grant defectors a refugee status and considers them illegitimate migrants despite meeting all criteria as refugees under international law. North Korean expatriates found in China are repatriated back to North Korea where they face torture, imprisonment and sometimes publicly executed.To circumvent repatriation, most North Koreans in China remain in hiding and are at the mercy of smugglers and human traffickers.

Human Rights of North Korea: Globally Condemned Rights

The government of North Korea continues to totalitarian rule and forbid basic freedom in the country.The government hinders all forms of freedom of expression and opinion and does not allow any organized political opposition, independent media, free trade unions, civil society organizations, or religious freedom.

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People arrested in North Korea are routinely tortured by officials and some of the common forms of torture are sleep deprivations, beating with iron rods and sexual abuse by guards on women. Executions are a common sight in North Korea for hazily defined offenses. Brutal force labor camps are established where refugees are tormented and hoarded with horrific living experience. Expressing doubt about the greatness of regime can bring three generation of imprisonment or execution.

by Naina Mishra of Newsgram, Twitter: Nainamishr94

 

Next Story

U.S. And South Korea Work Towards Improving Diplomacy With North Korea

About one hour before the scheduled meeting, around 40 Korean-Americans gathered near the near the White House in a show of support for President Moon, chanting slogans like “Peace maker president” and “We love Moon!”

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White House
US President Donald Trump welcomes South Korean President Moon Jae-in to the White House in Washington, DC, April 11, 2019. RFA

South Korean President Moon Jae-In and U.S. President Donald Trump agreed Thursday to keep up diplomacy with North Korea, including possible new summit talks with the North’s leader Kim Jong Un, but the allies disagreed on the level of economic sanctions needed to press Pyongyang to give up its nuclear weapons.

At their first meeting since Trump’s failed Hanoi summit with Kim Jong Un in February, Trump argued for keeping in place sanctions designed to starve the North’s nuclear and missile programs of hard currency, while saying he was open to meeting Kim a third time.

“We want sanctions to remain in place,” Trump said at the White House, according to U.S. media. “I think that sanctions right now are at a level that’s a fair level.”

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Kim is “a person I’ve gotten to know very well, and respect and hopefully, and I really believe over a period of time, a lot of tremendous things will happen. I think North Korea has a tremendous potential,” Trump told reporters before the talks. VOA

“There are various smaller deals that maybe could happen,” Trump said. “You could work out step-by-step pieces, but at this moment, we’re talking about the big deal. The big deal is we have to get rid of the nuclear weapons.”

Moon did not mention sanctions directly in his White House appearance, but he has called for sanctions relief to coax North Korea to begin nuclear disarmament.

North Korea experts say that Moon, who wants to remove curbs on inter-Korean economic projects, would privately lobby Trump for a gesture to keep Kim engaged in the diplomacy.

The Vietnam summit ended in disagreement over how Kim might shed its nuclear arsenal, as Trump demands and the sanctions relief that Kim seeks as a reward for cooperating.

Trump, who also met Kim in Singapore last year, said: “I enjoy the summits, I enjoy being with the chairman.”

Kim is “a person I’ve gotten to know very well, and respect and hopefully, and I really believe over a period of time, a lot of tremendous things will happen. I think North Korea has a tremendous potential,” Trump told reporters before the talks.

Moon said he was hopeful that a third U.S.-North Korea summit would happen. His national security adviser said Thursday that Moon would also try to have another meeting with Kim.

Bruce Klingner, a senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation think tank in Washington, told RFA that the disagreement about sanctions shows a rift between the U.S. and South Korea in terms of North Korea policy.

“It showed two allies remain far apart on approach to North Korea. President Moon wants to reward North Korea even though there has been no movement in denuclearization. The U.S. said it has no interest in that approach,” he said.

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U.S. President Donald Trump agreed Thursday to keep up diplomacy with North Korea, including possible new summit talks with the North’s leader Kim Jong Un, but the allies disagreed on the level of economic sanctions needed to press Pyongyang to give up its nuclear weapons. Pixabay

Richard Bush, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution said, “I give President Moon credit for trying to engage President Trump on [the North Korea] issue and trying to get closer alignment in our strategy toward North Korea. It appears that his attempt didn’t make too much progress.”

Also Read: Government Uses Movie Stills to Make Creative Appeal to Citizens to Make Best Use of Right to Vote

About one hour before the scheduled meeting, around 40 Korean-Americans gathered near the near the White House in a show of support for President Moon, chanting slogans like “Peace maker president” and “We love Moon!”

Meanwhile, a smaller group of 10 Korean-Americans chanted phrases in support of Trump’s hard line on North Korea and accused Moon of being a North Korean spy. (RFA)