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Unheard Plight of young girls of North Korea horrifies the gut

North Koreans have been struggling to make things right for themselves by sneaking across the border into China to elude oppression.

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March 30, 2017:

Elucidations by the defectors on Brutality of North Korea

Yeonmi Park, a North Korean defector and human rights activist who eluded to China in 2007 and settled in South Korea in 2009. The young girl fled for her freedom and dissipates the grave reality of North Korean government across the world. The novice was abducted at the time of birth and has been a fraction of oppressed North Koreans. Her family faced starvation after her father was sent to a labor camp for smuggling. They fled to China, where Park and her mother fell into the hands of human traffickers before dodging to Mongolia.

Park rose to global fame after she delivered a speech at the One Young World 2014 Summit in Dublin, Ireland — an annual summit that draws together young people from around the world to build up resolutions to endemic global problems.

Yeonami is now an advocate for sufferers of human trafficking in China due to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and works to uphold human rights in North Korea and around the globe.

When I was four years old, I was warned by my mother not to even whisper. The birds and the mice couldn’t hear me. I admit it, I thought the North Korean dictator could read my mind…At the age of 13, My mother allowed herself to be raped in order to protect me….Death or Dignity, armed with nights we were allowed to kill ourselves. I felt only stars were with us, cited Park in One young world 2014 summit.

Hyeonseo Lee, the author of the famous book, The Girl with Seven Names is the North Korean defector. She eluded from North Korea and succeedingly guided her family to escape from the country from China and Laos. She lived 10 years of secrecy in China and later on escaped to South Korea.

In the 1960s, during the chaotic years of famine and the Cultural Revolution in China, many Chinese people sought refuge in North Korea. Beginning in the late 1990s, the situation was reversed, and North Koreans have been fleeing their oppressive government ever since. The Chinese authorities should remember the hospitality their compatriots received in North Korea and treat desperate escapees with dignity and respect , told Lee Hyeon seo to New York Times.   

Sadistic Background of North Koreans

North Koreans have been struggling to make things right for themselves by sneaking across the border into China to elude oppression. The movements of people tightened after Kim’s death, the cruelty of the government included families living in close proximity to the border areas to take turns standing guard as well as having strong official warnings that three generations of a family would be ruined if caught defecting. The cruelty additionally commands having the defector being executed on the spot.

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Repatriation of defectors by China

China, an ally of North Korea refuses to grant defectors a refugee status and considers them illegitimate migrants despite meeting all criteria as refugees under international law. North Korean expatriates found in China are repatriated back to North Korea where they face torture, imprisonment and sometimes publicly executed.To circumvent repatriation, most North Koreans in China remain in hiding and are at the mercy of smugglers and human traffickers.

Human Rights of North Korea: Globally Condemned Rights

The government of North Korea continues to totalitarian rule and forbid basic freedom in the country.The government hinders all forms of freedom of expression and opinion and does not allow any organized political opposition, independent media, free trade unions, civil society organizations, or religious freedom.

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People arrested in North Korea are routinely tortured by officials and some of the common forms of torture are sleep deprivations, beating with iron rods and sexual abuse by guards on women. Executions are a common sight in North Korea for hazily defined offenses. Brutal force labor camps are established where refugees are tormented and hoarded with horrific living experience. Expressing doubt about the greatness of regime can bring three generation of imprisonment or execution.

by Naina Mishra of Newsgram, Twitter: Nainamishr94

 

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Trump Needs Obama For Dealing With North Korea, Said Jon Wolfsthal

Obama advised Trump to pursue the pressure option

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During a meeting regarding the transition, former President Barack Obama presented President-elect Donald Trump with two options for dealing with North Korea, said Jon Wolfsthal, a close Obama aide who served as senior director at the National Security Council for arms control and nonproliferation during the Obama administration.

The two options: Seek a freeze on North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs through direct engagement, or increase pressure on North Korea through China.

Obama advised Trump to pursue the pressure option, according to Wolfsthal. He specifically advised Trump to push for greater Chinese support to rein in the North’s nuclear development, he added.

“Making it clear to China that their continued protection of North Korea was beginning to undermine American security interests and that we would increasingly have to take steps to protect our interests in a way that might undermine China’s own security was a strategy that we believed was going to bear fruit,” Wolfsthal said during an interview with VOA Korean in February 2017, shortly after his departure from the Obama administration.

President Donald Trump talks with Kim Yong Chol, former North Korean military intelligence chief and one of leader Kim Jong Un's closest aides, as they walk from their meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, June 1, 2018.
President Donald Trump talks with Kim Yong Chol, former North Korean military intelligence chief and one of leader Kim Jong Un’s closest aides, as they walk from their meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, June 1, 2018. VOA

Pressure and engagement

Despite his repeated criticism of Obama for failing to stop North Korea’s nuclear development, Trump took Obama’s advice and employed it in his strategy. Pressuring China is a key element of Trump’s strategy on North Korea.

What makes Trump’s strategy different from Obama’s is it eventually pursues dialogue with North Korea.

Unlike Obama, who showed little interest in talks with North Korea, Trump is pursuing a dual strategy of pressure and engagement. He is using pressure and engagement in sequence: put pressure first and try engagement.

The purpose of Trump’s “maximum pressure campaign” is to press North Korea to return to dialogue and produce desirable outcomes from talks.

President Donald Trump talks with Kim Yong Chol, former North Korean military intelligence chief and one of leader Kim Jong Un's closest aides, as they walk from their meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, June 1, 2018.
President Donald Trump talks with Kim Yong Chol, former North Korean military intelligence chief and one of leader Kim Jong Un’s closest aides, as they walk from their meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, June 1, 2018. VOA

Trump’s strategy is a clear departure from the Obama administration’s, but it’s not unprecedented. A similar strategy was tried by William Perry, who served as secretary of defense from 1994-1997 under former President Bill Clinton. Perry advocated the so-called “coercive diplomacy,” that is, diplomacy backed up with a credible military threat.

US promises, silence on human rights

Trump sent a clear message to Pyongyang that his strategy is different from that of the previous administration: seeking dialogue while keeping sanctions in place.

In a bid to bring North Korea to the table and allay the North’s security concerns, the Trump administration laid out four actions the U.S. would not take against North Korea.

In August 2017, as tensions were rising rapidly after North Korea’s second intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) test, then-Secretary of State Rex Tillerson assured North Korea that the U.S. “will not seek a regime change, a collapse of the regime, an accelerated reunification of the peninsula, or an excuse to send military north of the 38th parallel.”

No previous U.S. administration had ever made such promises to North Korea in this way.

People watch a TV screen showing file footage of U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, May 16, 2018.
People watch a TV screen showing file footage of U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, May 16, 2018. VOA

Trump has also been relatively subdued in his criticism of North Korea’s human rights violations compared with previous administrations, a stance that has drawn criticism from some members of Congress and human rights groups. Trump’s supporters, however, say his efforts to engage North Korea would not be productive if the administration raised the human rights issue strongly.

Top-down approach

Trump may soon to be the first sitting U.S. president to meet with a North Korean leader, with the upcoming summit in Singapore. His top-down approach has had its ups and downs, however.

Supporters say Trump has made far more progress in diplomacy with North Korea than any of his predecessors. The dramatic shift from a possible military confrontation to a flurry of high-level diplomacy in less than six months was only possible because of Trump’s full support, they say.

Supporters argue Trump’s commitment to dialogue contributed to the North Korean regime’s decision to return to talks, saying Pyongyang has been seeking a summit with a U.S. president for many years.

Critics argue Trump should not start the discussions, but that his involvement should be the carrot at the end of the process.

They also argue allowing a North Korean leader to have a face-to-face meeting with a sitting U.S. president alone is a huge concession to North Korea. Such a meeting gives legitimacy to the North Korean regime, which it badly needs, without offering the U.S. anything in return.

Some critics also suggest the summit helps Kim shift his image from that of a “brutal dictator” who executed his uncle and ordered the assassination of his half brother to a “skillful leader.”

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspects a long- and medium-range ballistic rocket launch drill in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency in Pyongyang, Aug. 30, 2017.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspects a long- and medium-range ballistic rocket launch drill in this undated photo released by North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency in Pyongyang, Aug. 30, 2017. VOA

Fate of dual strategy

The Trump administration has said it will keep sanctions in place against Pyongyang until a complete denuclearization of North Korea is achieved. It believes maintaining sanctions will give the U.S. the upper hand in negotiations with North Korea.

It has also vowed to increase sanctions and international pressure against North Korea if talks fail.

Critics warn, however, that Trump’s pressure campaign will lose momentum once talks are under way.

Trump’s critics say the consequences of failed talks are great, and that it would be difficult for the administration to revive diplomatic efforts for sanctions if talks collapse at the summit.

Also read: Moon meet Trump North Korea summit

They caution it is unrealistic to unilaterally demand North Korea abandon its nuclear weapons, saying North Korea is likely to demand corresponding action from the United States.(VOA)