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Unheard Plight of young girls of North Korea horrifies the gut

North Koreans have been struggling to make things right for themselves by sneaking across the border into China to elude oppression.

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North Korea
Source : Wikimedia

March 30, 2017:

Elucidations by the defectors on Brutality of North Korea

Yeonmi Park, a North Korean defector and human rights activist who eluded to China in 2007 and settled in South Korea in 2009. The young girl fled for her freedom and dissipates the grave reality of North Korean government across the world. The novice was abducted at the time of birth and has been a fraction of oppressed North Koreans. Her family faced starvation after her father was sent to a labor camp for smuggling. They fled to China, where Park and her mother fell into the hands of human traffickers before dodging to Mongolia.

Park rose to global fame after she delivered a speech at the One Young World 2014 Summit in Dublin, Ireland — an annual summit that draws together young people from around the world to build up resolutions to endemic global problems.

Yeonami is now an advocate for sufferers of human trafficking in China due to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and works to uphold human rights in North Korea and around the globe.

When I was four years old, I was warned by my mother not to even whisper. The birds and the mice couldn’t hear me. I admit it, I thought the North Korean dictator could read my mind…At the age of 13, My mother allowed herself to be raped in order to protect me….Death or Dignity, armed with nights we were allowed to kill ourselves. I felt only stars were with us, cited Park in One young world 2014 summit.

Hyeonseo Lee, the author of the famous book, The Girl with Seven Names is the North Korean defector. She eluded from North Korea and succeedingly guided her family to escape from the country from China and Laos. She lived 10 years of secrecy in China and later on escaped to South Korea.

In the 1960s, during the chaotic years of famine and the Cultural Revolution in China, many Chinese people sought refuge in North Korea. Beginning in the late 1990s, the situation was reversed, and North Koreans have been fleeing their oppressive government ever since. The Chinese authorities should remember the hospitality their compatriots received in North Korea and treat desperate escapees with dignity and respect , told Lee Hyeon seo to New York Times.   

Sadistic Background of North Koreans

North Koreans have been struggling to make things right for themselves by sneaking across the border into China to elude oppression. The movements of people tightened after Kim’s death, the cruelty of the government included families living in close proximity to the border areas to take turns standing guard as well as having strong official warnings that three generations of a family would be ruined if caught defecting. The cruelty additionally commands having the defector being executed on the spot.

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Repatriation of defectors by China

China, an ally of North Korea refuses to grant defectors a refugee status and considers them illegitimate migrants despite meeting all criteria as refugees under international law. North Korean expatriates found in China are repatriated back to North Korea where they face torture, imprisonment and sometimes publicly executed.To circumvent repatriation, most North Koreans in China remain in hiding and are at the mercy of smugglers and human traffickers.

Human Rights of North Korea: Globally Condemned Rights

The government of North Korea continues to totalitarian rule and forbid basic freedom in the country.The government hinders all forms of freedom of expression and opinion and does not allow any organized political opposition, independent media, free trade unions, civil society organizations, or religious freedom.

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People arrested in North Korea are routinely tortured by officials and some of the common forms of torture are sleep deprivations, beating with iron rods and sexual abuse by guards on women. Executions are a common sight in North Korea for hazily defined offenses. Brutal force labor camps are established where refugees are tormented and hoarded with horrific living experience. Expressing doubt about the greatness of regime can bring three generation of imprisonment or execution.

by Naina Mishra of Newsgram, Twitter: Nainamishr94

 

Next Story

North Korea Explores Home-Grown, Sanctions-Proof Energy

The North’s interest in tidal energy also reflects a practical desire to exploit existing resources.

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North Korea
North Korean men walk with the West Sea Barrage in the background in Nampo, North Korea, Feb. 2, 2019. VOA

Power-strapped North Korea is exploring two ambitious alternative energy sources, tidal power and coal-based synthetic fuels, that could greatly improve living standards and reduce its reliance on oil imports and vulnerability to sanctions.

Finding a lasting energy source that isn’t vulnerable to sanctions has long been a priority for North Korean officials. Leader Kim Jong Un used his New Year’s address last month to call on the country to “radically increase the production of electricity” and singled out the coal-mining industry as a “primary front in developing the self-supporting economy.” For the longer-term, he stressed the importance of atomic, wind and tidal power.

Since further development of atomic energy is unlikely anytime soon, the power-scarce country is developing technology to “gasify” coal into substitute motor fuels. It also is looking into using huge sea barriers with electricity-generating turbines to harness the power of the ocean’s tides.

FILE - Young joggers pass by as smoke billows from the stack of the Pyongyang Power Plant in Pyongyang, North Korea, Dec. 15, 2018.
Young joggers pass by as smoke billows from the stack of the Pyongyang Power Plant in Pyongyang, North Korea, Dec. 15, 2018. VOA
Coal and hydropower

Coal and hydropower are North Korea’s main energy resources. The North imports nearly all of its oil and petroleum products from China. Solar panels are visible just about everywhere, from urban balconies to rural farm buildings and military installations. Wind remains a very minor energy source.

The North’s renewed focus on oil alternatives underscores what some foreign observers believe are two of its long-term best bets.

Kim’s late father, Kim Jong Il, tried to get international support for developing nuclear power in the 1990s before the North ultimately opted instead for nuclear weapons. That brought some of the most intense sanctions ever applied by the United Nations against the country, making its energy situation even more precarious.

But coal is something North Korea has in abundance.

It’s used to supply thermal power plants and factories, to heat homes and to make fertilizer and even a kind of cloth, called Vinylon. Slow-running, smoke-belching trucks that use a gasification process with firewood are common in the North Korean countryside. Coal isn’t generally seen as a good oil-product substitute because converting it to a liquid form is inefficient and expensive — coal gasification was last used on a large scale in Nazi Germany to keep its cars and trucks moving.

Efforts paying off

Given North Korea’s limited options, it’s a technology that appears to be paying off.

The output from one gasifier unit reportedly destined for the North Sunchon Chemical Plant, north of Pyongyang, could yield synthetic fuel amounting to about 10 percent of the North’s recent petroleum supply, according to a recent study for the Nautilus Institute by David von Hippel and Peter Hayes, two of the foremost experts on the issue. The study cited as one of its sources a Wall Street Journal report from December that tracked the unit to a Chinese exporter.

The facility is believed to be a center of “C-1” technology, which uses coal to make a kind of gas used to produce synthetic fuels, industrial chemicals and fertilizers.

Now that China has reduced its coal imports from the North in line with the sanctions, there’s more available for gasification.

“The project appears to provide a significant benefit to the DPRK, in terms of supplying fuels to compensate for petroleum product imports that run afoul of United Nations Security Council sanctions passed in the last two years, although the project will not completely replace all lost imports on its own,” they wrote in the report.

DPRK is short for the North’s official name, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

A North Korean man looks out to the sea as he stands on the West Sea Barrage in Nampo, North Korea, Feb. 2, 2019. North Korea's coast is a rich tidal power resource, one European official said.
A North Korean man looks out to the sea as he stands on the West Sea Barrage in Nampo, North Korea, Feb. 2, 2019. North Korea’s coast is a rich tidal power resource, one European official said. VOA

Power from the tides

The North’s interest in tidal energy also reflects a practical desire to exploit existing resources.

Glyn Ford, a former member of the European Parliament with extensive experience with the North, said he has had several discussions with North Korean officials regarding tidal power and even helped arrange a study tour to a facility in the UK a decade ago. He said they have tried to invite experts to the North.

The country is perfectly situated for tidal power.

“The bulk of the Korean Peninsula’s west coast is a rich tidal power resource,” Ford said in a telephone interview with The AP. “There are some detailed studies of the potential in South Korea and the same resources are there to be exploited north of the Demilitarized Zone.”

The world’s largest functioning tidal power plant is near the South Korean city of Ansan. It opened in 2011 and produces about enough power to support a city of 500,000.

Kim Jong Un has shown a strong penchant for mobilizing his million-man military on big projects. And the North has shown it can build something like a tidal power plant.

A guide stands next to a model of the West Sea Barrage in Nampo, North Korea, Feb. 2, 2019. North Korea is exploring alternative energy sources.
A guide stands next to a model of the West Sea Barrage in Nampo, North Korea, Feb. 2, 2019. North Korea is exploring alternative energy sources.VOA

One of North Korea’s proudest accomplishments is the gigantic West Sea Barrage, which was completed in 1986 at a cost of $4 billion. The huge seawall near the city of Nampo, a port about an hour’s drive from the capital, crosses the mouth of the Taedong River and helps control flooding and reduce the amount of salt that seeps in from the ocean, increasing the amount and quality of arable land.

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“The attraction is that, apart from the turbines, it is all a gigantic earth-moving project,” Ford said. “That’s ideal for the Korean People’s Army skillset.” (VOA)