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UNICEF: Children to face climate change impact

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source: todayonline.com

New York: Of the 2.3 billion children in the world, 690 million children, who are living in places which are most prone to climate change, have more chances of global warming caused death, disease and poverty, reported UNICEF.

Climate change and global warming would make diseases like pneumonia, diarrhea, malaria and malnutrition much more deadly. A very common cause of death now is hyperthermia, caused by heatwaves, which have increased in recent years and cause severe rashes, exhaustion, dehydration and cramps in young children and infants.

“Children will bear the brunt of climate change. They are already bearing a lot of the impact,” said one of the authors of the report, Nicholas Rees, a UNICEF policy specialist.

In the report titled ‘Unless We Act Now’, UNICEF said “Almost 530 million children live in extremely high flood occurrence zones”, mainly lying in Asia. In the other extreme, “nearly 160 million children live in areas of high or extremely high drought severity”, which are mostly in Africa.

When a place is hit by a drought or a flood, “a poor child and a rich child don’t stand the same chances”, said Rees.

Malnutrition and under-nutrition are being caused as a result of droughts affecting agriculture. This is causing half the deaths in the world among children below five.

Most vulnerable to floods are the Pacific islands, equatorial Africa, the Horn of Africa, along with coastal areas in South Asia, Caribbean and Latin America.

“Today’s children are the least responsible for climate change, but they, and their children, are the ones who will live with its consequences,” said Anthony Lake, the director of UNICEF.

(With inputs from Agencies)

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Starfish, Jellyfish To Benefit From Climate Change, Says Study

"These pioneer species are likely to benefit from the opening of new habitats through loss of sea ice and the food it provides."

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Jellyfishes are virtually immortal.
Jellyfishes are virtually immortal.

Seafloor predators and open water feeding animals like the starfish and the jellyfish will benefit from climate change, while those associated with sea ice for food or breeding are most at risk, a study said on Thursday.

Marine Antarctic animals closely associated with sea ice for food or breeding, such as the humpback whale and emperor penguin, are most at risk from the predicted effects of climate change, according to the study published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science.

Using risk assessments like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, scientists from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) determined the winners and losers of Antarctic climate change impact, which includes temperature rise, sea ice reduction and changes in food availability.

They show that seafloor predators and open water feeding animals, like starfish and jellyfish, will benefit from the opening up of new habitats.

“One of the strongest signals of climate change in the Western Antarctic is the loss of sea ice, receding glaciers and the break up of ice shelves,” said lead author Simon Morley from the BAS.

“Climate change will affect shallow water first, challenging the animals who live in this habitat in the very near future. While we show that many Antarctic marine species will benefit from the opening up of new areas of sea floor as habitat, those associated with sea ice are very much at risk.”

A growing body of research on how climate change will impact Antarctic marine animals prompted the researchers to review this information in a way that revealed which species were most at risk.

Starfish, jellyfish to benefit from climate change: Study. VOA

“We took a similar approach to risk assessments used in the workplace, but rather than using occupational safety limits, we used information on the expected impact of climate change on each animal,” said seabird ecologist Mike Dunn, co-author of the study, which forms part of a special article collection on aquatic habitat ecology and conservation.

“We assessed many different animal types to give an objective view of how biodiversity might fare under unprecedented change.”

They found that krill — crustaceans whose young feed on the algae growing under sea ice — were scored as vulnerable, in turn impacting the animals that feed on them, such as the adelie and chinstrap penguins and the humpback whale.

The emperor penguin scored as high risk because sea ice and ice shelves are its breeding habitat.

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Dunn added: “The southern right whale feeds on a different plankton group, the copepods, which are associated with open water, so it is likely to benefit. Salps and jellyfish, which are other open water feeding animals are likely to benefit too.”

The risk assessment also revealed that bottom-feeders, scavengers and predators, such as starfish, sea urchins and worms, may gain from the effects of climate change.

“Many of these species are the more robust pioneers that have returned to the shallows after the end of the last glacial maximum, 20,000 years ago, when the ice-covered shelf started to melt and retreat,” said co-author David Barnes.

“These pioneer species are likely to benefit from the opening of new habitats through loss of sea ice and the food it provides.” (IANS)