Thursday May 23, 2019
Home Uncategorized United Nation...

United Nations Picks up Indian Documentary in Virtual Reality, titled “Cost of Coal”

The film is based in Korba, Chhattisgarh, where about a fourth of India's coal is mined, leaving the land ravaged, air and water contaminated and lives disrupted

0
//
Anand Gandhi. Flickr

Mumbai, October 24, 2016: United Nations’ Virtual Reality app, UNVR, has acquired Indian documentary in VR, titled “Cost of Coal”.

Anand Gandhi, best known for his directorial “Ship of Theseus”, and his team at Memesys Culture Lab are the minds behind the film, helmed by filmmaker Faiza Khan.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

It is based in Korba, Chhattisgarh, where about a fourth of India’s coal is mined, leaving the land ravaged, air and water contaminated and lives disrupted.

“We (UN) have acquired ‘Cost of Coal’ and put it on the UNVR platform. It’s the first Indian film that gets that honour,” Gabo Arora, Creative Director and Senior Advisor at the United Nations, told IANS in a group interaction.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

He was part of a session on VR at the ongoing Jio MAMI 18th Mumbai Film Festival with Star here, where the current usage of virtual reality was discussed, and how it will possibly shape the future.

Gandhi, who was also one of the panellists, said: “I am very excited about it (his film getting picked for UNVR). We (his team) are also doing a VR piece that we are shooting with actor Irrfan Khan. It is fiction. We will start shooting soon.”

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

Director Shakun Batra, the founder and curator of VR at the film festival, which will conclude on October 27, said: “It is the first VR film from India to get acquired and I think that starts a whole new phase where VR is something that has return on investments. People are interested in acquiring our films in VR, that’s a big move.”

He believes that VR will be a new platform for storytellers and filmmakers. (IANS)

Next Story

Virtual Reality can Help People With Dementia: Study

The sessions were monitored with feedback gathered from patients and their caregivers

0
dementia
Painkillers may triple side effects risk in dementia patients. Pixabay

Virtual reality (VR) technology can enhance the quality of life for people with dementia by helping them to recall past memories, reduce aggression and improve interactions with caregivers, says a study.

The technology helped patients recall old memories by providing new stimuli difficult to achieve, due to ill health, or inaccessible within a secure environment, said the team from the University of Kent in the UK.

These memories not only provided positive mental stimulation for the patients but also helped their caregivers learn more about their lives before care, thereby improving their social interaction.

“VR can clearly have positive benefits for patients with dementia, their families and caregivers. It provides a richer and more satisfying quality of life than is otherwise available, with many positive outcomes,” said Jim Ang, Professor at the University of Kent.

For the study, the researchers picked eight patients aged between 41 and 88 who are living with dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease.

1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia. Pixabay
1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia. Pixabay

Each patient used a VR headset to ‘visit’ one of five virtual environments of a cathedral, a forest, a sandy beach, a rocky beach and a countryside scene.

The sessions were monitored with feedback gathered from patients and their caregivers.

Also Read- Novel AI Method Predicts Future Risk of Breast Cancer

The patients also demonstrated their own choices during the experiment, with some keen to explore different VEs within a session, while others explored the same environment repeatedly.

“With further research it will be possible to evaluate the elements of virtual environments that benefit patients and use VR even more effectively,” Jim Ang added. (IANS)