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Unnatural deaths mostly due to road accidents in India: Report

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

New Delhi: A report titled ‘National Health Profile 2015’ by the Central Bureau of Health Investigation revealed that road accidents claimed the highest number of lives in India while drowning and poisoning were some of the other major causes of unnatural deaths. The report said, a total of 166,506 people died in road accidents in 2013.

The report, giving accidental death statistics till 2013, showed that the number has seen a steady rise since 2005, when 118,265 people died on roads.

www.en.wikipedia.org
www.en.wikipedia.org

In 2013, while the number of people who drowned was 30041, a total of 29,249 lost their lives to poisoning.

Air crashes claimed the least number of people among unnatural causes of death. Six people died in air crashes in 2005, two died in 2006, 19 in 2008, 12 in 2008, 23 in 2010, 18 in 2011 and 14 in 2012. There were no deaths from air crashes in 2007.

The total number of deaths due to all unnatural causes in 2013 was 377,758.

An interesting data in the report is about people who died due to falls. A total of 9,132 people died due to falls in 2005 and 9,821 in 2006, numbers which again steadily climbed up to 12,803 in 2013.

In sharp contrast to this were deaths due to natural calamities which stood at 22,759. The number of all accidental and unnatural deaths in India climbed from 255,883 in 2000 to 400,517 in 2013.

Suicides rose from 108,593 in 2000 to 134,799 in 2013.

As compared to men, the number of women dying accidental deaths was less. While 87,847 women died due to accidents in 2013, a total of 312,670 men died.

As for suicides, the number of women who took their own lives at 44.256 was less than men, which stood at 88,453 in 2013.

(With inputs from IANS)

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IVF Babies Have 45% Higher Risk of Death before 1 Year of Age: Study

Mortality risk higher in IVF babies before 1 yr of age

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IVF
Children conceived through assisted reproductive techniques including IVF had a 45 per cent higher risk of death before 1 year of age than children conceived naturally. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Researchers have found that the children conceived through assisted reproductive techniques including IVF (in vitro fertilisation) had a 45 per cent higher risk of death before 1 year of age than children conceived naturally.

The findings, published in the journal Fertility and Sterility, link the increased risk to a higher degree of premature births in IVF children and emphasize that the risk of infant mortality is still very small for both groups.

“Our results indicate that the kind of assisted reproductive technique used may make a difference, and therefore it is important to further investigate what causes or underlying mechanisms are behind the risks,” said study lead author Anastasia Nyman Iliadou from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.

IVF
Prior studies show that IVF-pregnancies come with an increased risk of low birth weight, prematurity and birth defects. Pixabay

“They also show the need for extra attention and care of children conceived with IVF, especially during the first week of life,” Iliadou added.

Prior studies show that IVF-pregnancies come with an increased risk of low birth weight, prematurity and birth defects.

These risks have partly been linked to the increased probability of twin-births after IVF-treatment.

In the current study, the researchers selected only singleton children and compared mortality in children conceived through different types of assisted reproductive techniques with children who were conceived naturally.

They analysed data on 2.8 million children born in Sweden over a period of 30 years. Some 43,500 of these were the result of assisted reproduction.

In total, 7 236 children died before 1 year of age, of whom only 114 were conceived with assisted reproductive techniques.

After adjusting for confounding factors such as the mother’s age and earlier infertility, the researchers found that the children conceived through IVF had a 45 percent higher risk of death before 1 year of age than children conceived naturally.

IVF
According to the researchers, one explanation may be that more IVF-children are born prematurely than those conceived naturally, which in itself could have negative consequences. (Representational Image). Pixabay

The level of risk varied depending on which type of assisted reproductive technique was used, and how many days had passed since birth. The risk gradually declined after the first weeks of life.

During the first week of life, the children conceived after transfer of a frozen embryo had a more than two-fold higher risk of death than the children conceived naturally.

This was, however, based on only a small sample of children conceived with frozen embryos.

After one week, the risk dropped to about the same level as the naturally conceived children.

Infants conceived from transfer of a fresh embryo or with the help of an intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)–where a single sperm is injected into the egg–did not have a higher risk of death than naturally conceived children, irrespective of how many days had passed since birth.

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According to the researchers, one explanation may be that more IVF-children are born prematurely than those conceived naturally, which in itself could have negative consequences.

The leading causes of infant mortality among children conceived with assisted reproductive techniques included respiratory distress, incomplete lung development, infections and neonatal hemorrhage, which are conditions often linked to prematurity. (IANS)