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Unnatural deaths mostly due to road accidents in India: Report

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

New Delhi: A report titled ‘National Health Profile 2015’ by the Central Bureau of Health Investigation revealed that road accidents claimed the highest number of lives in India while drowning and poisoning were some of the other major causes of unnatural deaths. The report said, a total of 166,506 people died in road accidents in 2013.

The report, giving accidental death statistics till 2013, showed that the number has seen a steady rise since 2005, when 118,265 people died on roads.

www.en.wikipedia.org
www.en.wikipedia.org

In 2013, while the number of people who drowned was 30041, a total of 29,249 lost their lives to poisoning.

Air crashes claimed the least number of people among unnatural causes of death. Six people died in air crashes in 2005, two died in 2006, 19 in 2008, 12 in 2008, 23 in 2010, 18 in 2011 and 14 in 2012. There were no deaths from air crashes in 2007.

The total number of deaths due to all unnatural causes in 2013 was 377,758.

An interesting data in the report is about people who died due to falls. A total of 9,132 people died due to falls in 2005 and 9,821 in 2006, numbers which again steadily climbed up to 12,803 in 2013.

In sharp contrast to this were deaths due to natural calamities which stood at 22,759. The number of all accidental and unnatural deaths in India climbed from 255,883 in 2000 to 400,517 in 2013.

Suicides rose from 108,593 in 2000 to 134,799 in 2013.

As compared to men, the number of women dying accidental deaths was less. While 87,847 women died due to accidents in 2013, a total of 312,670 men died.

As for suicides, the number of women who took their own lives at 44.256 was less than men, which stood at 88,453 in 2013.

(With inputs from IANS)

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Commute to Work by Walking, Cycling Instead of Car to Reduce Early Death Risk

Driving to work may increase risk of early death

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Cycling your way to work may reduce risk of early death. Pixabay

People who walk, cycle and travel by train to work are at reduced risk of early death or illness compared with those who commute by car, according to a new study.

For the findings, published in the journal The Lancet Planetary Health, the researchers conducted a study on more than 300,000 commuters in England and Wales. They used census data to track the same people for up to 25 years, between 1991-2016. The researchers from Imperial College London and the University of Cambridge in the UK, suggest increased walking and cycling post-lockdown may reduce deaths from heart disease and cancer.

“As large numbers of people begin to return to work as the COVID-19 lockdown eases, it is a good time for everyone to rethink their transport choices,” said study researcher Dr Richard Patterson from the University of Cambridge.

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People travel by train to work are at reduced risk of early death or illness. Pixabay

The research team found that compared with those who drove, those who cycled to work had a 20 per cent reduced rate of early death, 24 per cent reduced rate of death from cardiovascular disease during the study period, a 16 per cent reduced rate of death from cancer, and an 11 per cent reduced rate of a cancer diagnosis.

Walking to work was associated with a seven per cent reduced rate in cancer diagnosis, compared to driving. The team explain that associations between walking and other outcomes, such as rates of death from cancer and heart disease, were less certain.

One potential reason for this is people who walk to work are, on average, in less affluent occupations than people who drive to work, and more likely to have underlying health conditions which could not be fully accounted for.

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The study shows that those who drove had a 20 per cent increased rate of early death compared to those who cycled to work. Pixabay

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The research also revealed that compared with those who drove to work, rail commuters had a 10 per cent reduced rate of early death, a 20 per cent reduced rate of death from cardiovascular disease, and a 12 per cent reduced rate of cancer diagnosis.

This is likely due to them walking or cycling to transit points, although rail commuters also tend to be more affluent and less likely to have other underlying conditions.”With severe and prolonged limits in public transport capacity likely, switching to private car use would be disastrous for our health and the environment,” Patterson said.”Encouraging more people to walk and cycle will help limit the longer-term consequences of the pandemic,” Patterson wrote. (IANS)

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Workplace Stress Can Increase Likelihood of Death: Study

The study, which was published in the Journal of Applied Psychology tells that workload can increase the risk of death

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A recent study shows that demanding jobs can lead to depression and death. Pixabay

Researchers have revealed that stress, lack of autonomy and ability at the workplace or due to the demanding jobs can lead to depression and death.

The study, published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, found that our mental health and mortality have a strong correlation with the amount of autonomy we have at our job, our workload and job demands, and our cognitive ability to deal with those demands.

“When job demands are greater than the control afforded by the job or an individual’s ability to deal with those demands, there is a deterioration of their mental health and, accordingly, an increased likelihood of death,” said study lead author Erik Gonzalez-Mule from Indiana University in the US.

For the findings, the researchers used data from 3,148 Wisconsin residents who participated in the nationally representative, longitudinal Midlife in the US survey. Of those in their sample, 211 participants died during the 20-year study.

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Time pressure or workload affect mental and physical health and, ultimately, death. Pixabay

They examined how job control — or the amount of autonomy employees have at work — and cognitive ability — or people’s ability to learn and solve problems — influence how work stressors such as time pressure or workload affect mental and physical health and, ultimately, death.

“We found that work stressors are more likely to cause depression and death as a result of jobs in which workers have little control or for people with lower cognitive ability,” Gonzalez-Mule said.

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On the other hand, the research team also found that job demands resulted in better physical health and lower likelihood of death when paired with more control of work responsibilities.

“COVID-19 might be causing more mental health issues, so it’s particularly important that work not exacerbate those problems,” Gonzalez-Mule said.

“This includes managing and perhaps reducing employee demands, being aware of employees’ cognitive capability to handle demands and providing employees with autonomy are even more important than before the pandemic began,” he noted. (IANS)

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Here’s Why Cancer Patients Should Fear COVID-19

Cancer patients may face high mortality from COVID-19: Study

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The researchers were able to reduce virus reproduction using translation inhibitors. Pixabay

An Indian-origin team of researchers in the US has claimed that people with cancer who develop coronavirus (COVID-19) are much more likely to die from the disease than those without cancer.

The mortality rate for coronavirus disease in the US is 5.8 per cent, according to the World Health Organisation. “Our findings emphasise the need to prevent cancer patients from contracting coronavirus disease and – if they do – to identify and closely monitor these individuals for dangerous symptoms,” said study co-lead author Vikas Mehta from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the US.

For the study, published in the journal Cancer Discovery, the research team involved 218 cancer patients who tested positive for coronavirus disease from March 18 to April 8 at Montefiore Medical Centre in New York City.

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A total of 61 cancer patients died from coronavirus disease , a dramatically high case-fatality rate of 28 per cent. According to the researchers, a key element is that mortality appears to be more closely related to frailty, age, and co-morbidities than to active therapy for cancer.

“Our data suggest that we should not stop lifesaving cancer therapies, but rather develop strategies to minimize potential coronavirus exposures and re-evaluate therapies for our most vulnerable cancer populations,” explained co-senior author Amit Verma. As a group, coronavirus disease patients with hematologic (blood) cancers, such as leukemia and lymphoma, had the highest mortality rate: 37 per cent (20 of 54 patients), the study said. For patients with solid malignancies, the mortality rate was 25 per cent (41 of 164).

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People with cancer who develop coronavirus (COVID-19) are much more likely to die from the disease. Pixabay

Striking differences were observed among specific solid cancers: the mortality rate for patients with lung cancer was 55 per cent and colorectal cancer was 38 per cent, compared with mortality rates of 14 per cent for breast cancer and 20 per cent for prostate cancer.

Certain underlying conditions–older age, hypertension, heart disease, and chronic lung disease–were significantly associated with increased mortality among cancer patients with COVID-19, the researchers said.

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A detailed analysis of patients with cancer who died from COVID-19 shows that more than half of these individuals–37 of 61–had been in places with a higher risk of exposure to COVID-19, such as nursing homes, hospitals or emergency departments within the 30 days before being diagnosed with COVID-19.

According to the Johns Hopkins University tracker, the US currently accounts for the highest number of COVID-19 cases and deaths in the world at 1,103,781 and 65,068, respectively. (IANS)