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Unsafe women, unsafe Delhi: people call for a change

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New Delhi: With the number of crimes against women escalating by leaps and bounds in Delhi, the female folk, especially the young girls, face a plethora of challenges while going out.

The crimes against women had also tarnished the reputation of Delhi which had been branded as the “rape capital”.

It is, however, the collective responsibility of every citizens to take up the issue and address it at the earliest.

The alleged atrocities against women has also changed people’s perception about Delhi. Only a notorious faction of the society is responsible behind the debacle.

The situation demands a total revamp of the attitude of the people living in the capital.

But what kind of attitude and behavior is required for a change? What should be the role of public? What should be the role of government?

Expressing concerns over the security of women in Delhi, the High Court stated that there was a need for a “sea change in the medieval mindsets” of people with regards to their attitudes towards women.

Creating mass awareness is another important weapon to curb sexual offences against women. Though mass awareness campaigns were carried out but they failed to provide an effective solution.

How can one forget what happened on 16th December 2012? Did ‘Nirbhaya’ get justice?

Though people came down to the streets to demand justice, but the scenario did not change. Rapes continued, atrocities on women did not stop and politicians ceaselessly tried defending people.

Media did play a major role in spreading the awareness. But they highlighted their agenda and aired news of rape by highly sensationalizing them.

It became a fashion for the media houses to broadcast or publish news stories related to rape as it brings them more eyeballs.

But media never pay heed to the fact that the more they use the word ‘rape’ the more they inflict a never-healing wound to the psyche to the victims. Furthermore, media reports alienate the victims from the society.

It was not the fault of the victims that they were raped. Even after that trauma, the society made them feel that they were solely responsible for it. This attitude needs to change for bringing in a paradigm change.

The crimes against the women testify the loophole in the security system of the government. It was only after the ‘Nirbhaya’ incident that incidents of the heinous crime were being reported.

Police data says that most of the cases are committed by persons known to the victim. It might be mentioned that in most cases it was the minors who faced the brutalities.

Minor crimes

 

The situation is indeed concerning. A paradigm change is needed to curb the incidents.

Government moves and initiatives would not work if the people do not support it.

Mera imaan, Mahilaon ki samman’ written on the back of public transport like autos and taxis does prove that people do want to get out of the stigma and build a safer Delhi for women.

(By Adita Mehta, Edited by Arka Mondal)

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Facts about Indian Railways you can’t miss

India proudly boasts of world's largest railway network. Not only that, but the India railways itself can boast as the biggest employer in the India. 

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Facts about Indian Railways you shouldn't miss. Wikimedia Common
Facts about Indian Railways you shouldn't miss. Wikimedia Common

India proudly boasts of world’s largest railway network. Not only that, but the India railways itself can boast as the biggest employer in India.

Railways is a major part of India, not only because of its importance as a means of transportation but also because of its political and economic significance.

Here are some interesting facts about Indian Railways which might surprise you :

  • The New Delhi-Bhopal Shatabdi Express is the fastest train in India. The train runs at an average speed of 91 kmph and touches a top speed of 150 kmph on the 195 km Delhi-Agra stretch. The Nilgiri Express with an average speed of 10 kmph is said to be India’s slowest train.
Indian Railways is one of the most important and controversial transport in India. Wikimedia Commons
Indian Railways is one of the most important and controversial transports in India. Wikimedia Commons
  •  Indian Railways-owned the longest railway platform in the world at Kharagpur with a length of 2,733 feet. Now, breaking the record, Gorakhpur station has recently taken its place with a length of 4,430 feet.
  • Two historical railway elements are included in the UNESCO’ World Heritage site list – the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus, and the Indian Mountain Railways.The Indian Mountain Railways includes three railways – the Darjeeling Himalayan Railways, Nilgiri Mountain Railways and Kalka Shimla Railway. All three trains have been functional for some 100 years. The Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus is famous for its classic fusion of Gothic art with Indian architecture.
Indian Railways is on UNESCO list too. Wikimedia Commons.
Indian Railways is on UNESCO list too. Wikimedia Commons.
  • The Vivek Express (Dibrugarh to Kanyakumari) travels the longest distance of 4273 km. The shortest run is taken by a few scheduled services between Nagpur and Ajni – a total of 3 kms.
  • Mathura junction has the maximum number of routes emerging from it. The 7 of them include – Broad Gauge (BG) line to Agra Cantt, BG line to Bharatpur, BG line to Alwar, BG line to Delhi, Metre Gauge (MG) line to Achnera, MG line to Vrindavan and MG line to Hathras.
  • The railways function on a high operating ratio of 94%, that is, it spends 94 paise on every rupee that it earns.
  • The mascot for Indian Railways is Bholuor Bholu the guard elephant, which was designed by National Institute of Design. It was introduced on 16th April 2002.

    Bholu - the elephant guard was revealed in 2002. Wikimedia Commons
    Bholu – the elephant guard was revealed in 2002. Wikimedia Commons
  • The oldest working Indian locomotive still in use is the Fairy Queen, which worked with a steam engine.
  • India has eight Railway Museums – in Delhi, Pune, Kanpur, Mysore, Kolkata, Chennai, Ghum, and Tiruchirappalli. The National Railway Museum in Delhi is the largest rail museum in Asia.
  • Toilets were introduced in 1909 in the lower classes of trains, after a letter by certain Okhil Babu that described the ordeal he faced due to the absence of lavatories.