Tuesday December 18, 2018

Urban Theka- Offering the vibrant tradition and culture rooted in Punjab

The store, ‘Urban Theka’ is an amalgamation of Punjab’s colourful, humorous and vibrant life

0
//
Urban Theka, Chandigarh Source: Youtube
Republish
Reprint

Chandigarh: This is one thing that Punjabis don’t mind wearing on their sleeves – ‘Punjabiat’. Even the younger generation of Punjabis, be it in India or abroad, are quite inclined to do so.

With the demand for traditional Punjabi things, which are packaged in tune with the times and latest demand, increasingly in the last few years, stores dealing with traditional items and even catchy Punjabi one-liners are creating business out of the demand.

In a leading mall in Chandigarh, where top brands vie with each other for maximum footfalls and selling trendy and latest stuff, a new store has taken up the challenge of offering the vibrant tradition and culture rooted in Punjab.

From the signboard at the entrance, which proudly proclaims ‘Theka Khushiyaan Da’ (Vend of happiness), the store, ‘Urban Theka’, is an amalgamation of Punjab’s colourful, humorous and vibrant life.

This ‘mini Punjab’ guarantees you a true and raw taste of Punjab. Located on the second floor in Elante Mall, this store can be spotted from a distance, thanks to its bright ambience, handmade figurines and ‘phulkaris’.

Related article: Punjab Grill: One stop for all Punjabi food cravings

“Our opening coincided with Baisakhi — Punjab’s colourful festival. The happiness surrounding Baisakhi goes well with the theme of ‘Urban Theka’,” I. P. Singh, an entrepreneur, who along with his wife, Sunny Thakral, has painstakingly put together the concept, told IANS.

The husband-wife duo say that the “idea is to merge Punjab’s age- old rural culture with its modernity”.

The trend was started over a decade ago by popular brand ‘1469’ which cashed on the demand for ‘anything Punjabi’. Its ‘Pure Punjabi’ brand of T-shirts have been a runaway hit among youth and even the older ones.

The ‘Urban Theka’ store reminds one of the Punjabi folklore and traditions with ladies weaving and embroidering dupattas in phulkaris, men and women doing the ‘bhangra’ and men with ‘dhols’, ‘chimtas’ and ‘sapps’ (traditional musical instruments).

“You get a feel of rural Punjab. One can see beautifully chiselled figurines of Punjabi women churning butter using ‘madhaani’ (traditional butter-making equipment), women using the ‘charkha’ and the like.

The store also takes you to the times of ‘Bhai Kanhaiya’, a Sikh sevadar who served water to the Mughal enemy forces injured in the war against the Sikh forces. Punjab’s history is highlighted through figurines and busts of personalities like ‘Mai Bhago’, ‘Banda Bahadur’, a life size statue of ‘Maharaja Ranjit Singh’ and many more,” Singh said.

Other items in the store like ‘bantey’ (marbles), ‘gulli danda’ and ‘gulail’ are sure to take you down memory lane and revive childhood memories.

To catch the fancy of the youth, the store sells funky T-shirts with quirky text like “Dheet (stubborn) by Nature” and “Installing muscles – Bass Vekhi chall”. The price ranges from Rs.500 to Rs.1,500.

The outlet has been curated with accessories that incorporate a good, humorous style, so typical of Punjab, which makes it a “must own”.

Miniature trucks have an authentic look with mis-spelt one-liners like ‘Use Diaper at Night’ imitating the ones to be spotted on the highways. ‘Drink Responsibly – Dullann na Deyo’ (Don’t let it spill).

Pre-stitched parnas and turbans make it one of the only shops to be selling turbans in malls. Also, phulkari dupattas, artistically embroidered by women in the villages of Patiala, are displayed. The store directly deals with the craftsmen embroidering phulkaris and designing juttis, eliminating the middlemen.

“Urban Theka is not only displaying the culture of Punjab in a unique way but is also helping in reviving the diminishing art and craft in Punjab. It is quite a refreshing store,” Anuradha Kumar, a shopper who happened to cross the store and got attracted to have a “look in”.

The statement outside the trial room says ‘Try Maar Lai’. A car sticker ‘Caution – Peg Lagga’ for the back-screen. Coasters are no less: ‘Aao Bhaino Chugli Kariye’ (Come sisters, let’s gossip).

The brand ‘1469’ has been the pioneer in promoting traditional items, especially clothes and accessories, to the youth in a big way through its stores and online sales.

In Chandigarh’s Sector 17, the ‘1469’ store attracts many customers who want to wear their ‘Punjabiat’ on their sleeve, literally!

The store and some other shops like this sell traditional ware in Punjab and Haryana.

While these stores have been around for nearly a decade, earlier it was the Punjab government-run ‘Phulkari’ stores which sold traditional items – from Punjabi juttis to phulkari duppattas and suits.

With bright, colourful items being sold, there’s never a dull moment in ‘Urban Theka’, ‘1469’, ‘Phulkari’ or other places with traditional stuff for sure. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Puja for The Spiritualism, Not for Vulgar Entertainment

The westerners practicing Hinduism have learned a pretty well from our "scriptures" and are becoming more spiritual while we just locked up those "holy books" only in the drawers of the altar. Thus we only love to shake our “butts to the boom-boom of Bollywood”.. right in front of the Gods' idols !!!

0
Hinduism
he westerners practicing Hinduism have learned a pretty well from our "scriptures"

By Salil Gewali

Any auspicious days in Hinduism are expected to be observed with a complete purity of action and thought. The same holds true for other religions too. As per the Hindu scriptures, the believers are required to stay away from any kind of sense gratifications, particularly when the specific days are dedicated to Gods and Goddess such as Navratri, Laxmi Puja, Krishna Janmashtami, Shivaratri, to name a few. The pathway to devotion and spiritualism should not be “desecrated” by the blot of the brazen entertainment. The scriptures logically explain why it is antithetical, and its adverse consequences.

Hindusim
Incidentally, the Bhagavad Gita describes such situation as the rise of “tamasic vibes”.

 But, what a huge irony, rather a blasphemy that many people these days have started to choose the auspicious days of Gods to satisfy their base senses. Without a wee bit of regret, a certain class of people holds almost every auspicious day as the most “unmissable” occasion to booze with the friends, and what not, and stagger back home, lol! Such bizarre practices are fast catching now than ever.  Sadly, hardly any conscious people and spiritual organizations stand up and take the right measures to check such godless deviations.

What is quite unpleasant is that such a kind of unholy practices are often being facilitated by certain “Hindu intuitions” as well. On this past Laxmi Puja, the “propitious time” to perform the ritual had fallen between 6 PM to 7:53 PM. Yours truly decided to use that span of time for meditation. But hell broke loose. Apart from fireworks around, the Bollywood songs in high decibel burst forth from a certain Hindu institution quite frustrated the mission.

Hindusim
Sadhu Sanga Retreat, 2016

 One senior citizen laments – “Nothing could be irreligious than the fact that a favorable time for “puja” is also being used for the wrongful purposes. We rather expect the “Hindu institutions” to teach our children Bhajan, Kirtan, and other spiritual activities, not the loud and feverish parties and disturb others.”

Another college student adds “Having been much disturbed by the noise pollution, I have persuaded my parents to shift our place of residence to elsewhere, not at least near holy places with an unholy mission. I have started to see such institutions with the eyes of suspicion these says.” Is it that our institutions are unable to use their “discretion”, and as a result, they fail to differentiate between right and wrong?  One is deeply apprehensive that Bollywood songs and vulgar dances might as well be included as a part of the “puja ritual” as we have long accepted the fun of fireworks bursting as an integral part of Laxmi Puja which in fact is just an entrenched “misconception”.

Hinduism
Hinduism is expected to be observed with a complete purity of action

Needless to say, our roar for consumerism has almost drowned the whisper of inherent spiritualism. We are only just sending out the wrong messages. I’m afraid, the whole culture itself might be looked down with derision by other faiths. It might just become a subject of ridicule! It is no exaggeration, such negative notions against the “wrong practices” are all what we often read these days in several newspapers and social media. Do we want others to demean our profound spiritual heritage thus?  I believe it calls for a serious soul-searching.

Incidentally, the Bhagavad Gita describes such situation as the rise of “tamasic vibes”.  It warns in the strongest terms that mankind should absolutely be careful not to fall under the influence of any short-lived sense gratifications. Or else, our endeavor to “practice and preserve” the sanctity of a religion/spiritualism will be a futile exercise.

However, on the other hand, the westerners practicing Hinduism have learned a pretty well from our “scriptures” and are becoming more spiritual while we just locked up those “holy books” only in a drawer of the altar. Thus we only love to shake our “butts to the boom-boom of Bollywood”.. right in front of the Gods’ idols !!!

Salil Gewali is a well-known writer and author of ‘Great minds on India’.

Twitter:@SGewali.