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US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) bans 19 chemicals commonly found in antibacterial soaps

In 2013, the FDA proposed the ban, saying that using antibacterial soaps containing these chemicals “could pose health risks, such as bacterial resistance or hormonal effects”

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The FDA has banned 19 chemicals commonly found in antibacterial soaps. Image source: Pixabay

September 05, 2016: The FDA has banned 19 chemicals commonly found in antibacterial soaps.

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned 19 chemicals found in the antibacterial soaps which are widely used by Americans.

“Companies will no longer be able to market antibacterial washes with these ingredients because manufacturers did not demonstrate that the ingredients are both safe for long-term daily use and more effective than plain soap and water in preventing illness and the spread of certain infections,” the FDA wrote in a news release.

In its ruling, the FDA said this would apply to soaps containing any of the 19 chemicals, including triclosan, found in liquid soaps, and triclocarbon, found in soap bars.

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The FDA said some soap manufacturers had already removed these ingredients.

“Consumers may think antibacterial washes are more effective at preventing the spread of germs, but we have no scientific evidence that they are any better than plain soap and water,” said Janet Woodcock, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). “In fact, some data suggests that antibacterial ingredients may do more harm than good over the long-term.”

Antibacterial hand wipes, liquid hand sanitizers and other products used in a “healthcare setting” are not covered by the ruling.

In 2013, the FDA proposed the ban, saying that using antibacterial soaps containing these chemicals “could pose health risks, such as bacterial resistance or hormonal effects.”

The agency sought further data from manufacturers that showed the soaps were effective but said such data was not provided.

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Manufacturers have one year to comply to the FDA’s ruling.

While the FDA maintains that simple soap and water is the best way to prevent spreading germs, if they are not available, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends using a hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol. (VOA)

  • Jagpreet Kaur Sandhu

    For the good of human skin! Well we need to understand as consumers.

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Air Pollution has Negative Impacts on Human and Animal Health: Study

Air pollution linked to heart issues in humans, animals

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Air pollution human animal
Air pollution increases risks of deteriorating heart health in human and animals. Lifetime Stock

Researchers have found that air pollution is associated with detrimental impacts on human and animals health, including increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

The study, published in The Journal of Physiology, by researchers at The University of Manchester in UK, shows that the knowledge people have about how pollution harms the hearts of marine species can be applied to humans, as the underlying mechanisms are similar.

Around 11,000 coronary heart disease and stroke deaths in the UK each year are attributable to air pollution, specifically due to particulate matter (PM), or small particles in the air that cause health problems.

PM2.5 is one of the finest and most dangerous type of PM, is a compound for which the UK has failed to meet European Union limits.

“We know that air pollution can have a hugely damaging effect on heart and circulatory health, and this review summarises mechanisms potentially contributing to impaired heart function,” said study researcher Jeremy Pearson, Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation.

air pollution heart
Air pollution can have a hugely damaging effect on heart and circulatory health. Lifetime Stock

For the findings, the researchers looked across all vertebrates and particularly focused on a set of compounds that binds to the surface of PM, called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as its amount on PM is associated with the detrimental affects that air pollution has on the heart.

“Pollution affects all of us living on Planet Earth. Due to the conserved nature of cardiac function amongst animals, fish exposed to PAH from oil spills can serve as indicators, providing significant insights into the human health impacts of PAHs and PM air pollution,” said Holly Shiels, study senior author from the University of Manchester.

Studies after the ‘1999 Exxon Valdez oil spill’ showed that the ecosystem still has not recovered 20 years on.

Also Read- Southeast Asian Activists Pressurize Regional Govts to Offer Climate Action Plan

According to the researchers, in 2010, research on fish after the ‘Deepwater Horizon oil spill’, which released large quantities of PAHs into the marine environment, showed that the heart’s ability to contract was impaired.

“Reducing air pollution is crucial to protecting our heart health, which is why the British Heart Foundation, is calling on the next Government to commit to reducing air pollution to within WHO limits,” Pearson said. (IANS)