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US Professor creates awareness about Sanskrit among students of Thane

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Thane: It was an opportune moment for the students of Thane’s Bedekar College. The US Professor Emeritus George Cardona came down on Saturday to conduct a workshop in the college, creating awareness among pupils about the basics and nuances of the age-old mother of Indian languages, Sanskrit.

Cardona is a notable linguist and Indologist from the University of Pennsylvania. He was in Thane, Mumbai on February 6.  Professor Narayan Barse said, “He is here to conduct a Sanskrit workshop in Pune, which is being relayed through video-conferencing to 7-8 centres in the world, Bedekar College is one of these centres.”

Cardona talked about the ancient scholar Panini and his ‘Karak’ theory in grammar while addressing the students. A Sanskrit grammarian from ancient India, Panini was the renowned creator of 3,959 rules of Sanskrit morphology, syntax and semantics.

“Globally, Panini is considered an authority on Karak theory. Cardona made this complex theory so simple for the students. It was a pleasure to learn this from him,” Barse added.

Talking about the significance and rising demand for ancient language globally, Cardona insists about learning the language and other topics related to it. He said that because all sacred books in India are in Sanskrit, it is important to learn it.

Also giving examples about the difference in Marathi and English languages, he told about how a pot can be any utensil in English, but in Marathi, every pot holds a particular name.

According to the US Professor, Sanskrit is a treasure trove of our culture and we should preserve it.

“Cardona speaks the language like a pandit. If a person like him is teaching Sanskrit, then everybody would like to learn from him,” said Barse.

(NAVEETA SINGH, dnaindia.com)

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US Planning For Space Force To Stay Ahead in War

The general says his team is already writing government proposals to make space resupply a certainty for future military mobility

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Air Force Gen. Carlton D. Everhart, the Commander of Air Mobility Command, left, holds a binder with a photograph of Air Force One on the cover as he speaks to Navy Adm. Bill Moran, Vice Chief of Naval Operations, second from left, while arriving with other generals and admirals for a meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Mar-a-Lago, in Palm Beach, Fla., Dec. 21, 2016. (VOA)

It might sound like science fiction, but the general in charge of the U.S. military’s air transports across the globe says refueling and resupplying the military may soon be a job that’s literally out of this world.

“If I can resupply from space I can go across globe in about 30 minutes,” Air Force General Carlton Everhart, the head of Air Mobility Command, told VOA. “I do truly believe that is the next step. We can really make inroads.”

Everhart says the time gained by using hypersonic craft in space could keep him ahead in “the speed of war,” where competitors China and Russia have been trying to make gains.

The idea of using space deliveries isn’t as far out as it may seem. In fact, industry leaders, companies Everhart hopes to partner with, are already working on this type of technology.

Launch vehicles from companies like SpaceX, Sierra Nevada, and even foreign ventures could “provide tremendous strategic advantage to the U.S. government,” according to Eric Stallmer, the president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation.

But it’s an advantage that would come with an astronomical price tag of thousands of dollars per kilo.

Experts say the need to transport via space must outweigh these costs, perhaps only being used during the most important of missions.

Todd Harrison, a space and defense expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, points to the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, which killed U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, as a situation where time necessities could overpower cost concerns.

“Imagine if we had been able to launch a SEAL team and put them right down in that compound within 45 minutes of knowing that it was under attack. It could have made the difference,” he said.

The general is not just focused on launching from one point on Earth to another, Everhart also wants to use satellites to preposition cargo in space.

Stallmer said a lot of spaceflight companies are looking at this idea of space refueling depots, including plans to convert those refueling vehicles to habitats within space once they’ve been used.

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The future is full of possibilities, but it is unclear when these technologies will be fully developed. Experts give estimates ranging from a couple of years to more than a decade, but that doesn’t stop Everhart from dreaming.

“The train is leaving the station and we’re going to be on it. And I’m not going to be on the caboose. I want to be in front of, I’m going to be in the front,” he said.

The general says his team is already writing government proposals to make space resupply a certainty for future military mobility. (VOA)

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