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USA warming to Primaries on Tuesday (Super-Primaries)

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Hillary Clinton

In 2 days from now, USA Presidential primaries will see Super-Tuesday when 12 states will hold the primaries to choose their party nominees. The fight is on!

As Voice of America reports: “In coming days, Americans could have a much better sense of who will be this year’s Republican and Democratic Presidential nominees. 12 states hold primary elections or caucuses Tuesday, and, in most of those states, polls show Republican front-runner Donald Trump and Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton with substantial leads.”

Yesterday, in the democratic primaries held in South Carolina, Hillary Clinton easily beat the Democrat socialist Bernie Sanders, making the road tough for the latter. While among the Republicans, the billionaire business, often outspoken, Mr Donald Trump is leading the path with clear victories. However, Republicans  Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz -even though trailing behind, have vowed to continue their fight. The verdict on super-Tuesday will be crucial for the candidates.

Primaries are elections where party members or voters vote for their candidate of choice within the party in the fight for the Presidential nomination. The winner from each party then goes to face the Presidential elections, held in November. This year, as Obama ends his 8 years of Presidency, the November elections will see a new President in office. The new President will be sworn in January of 2017.

Primaries or caucuses are part of inner-party democracy in the USA. Here, the candidates are not imposed from above, ie, high command. Rather the ticket aspirants have to fight among themselves (via elections) to secure the nomination.

USA has the Presidential system of governance. The term of President is for four years and an individual can not occupy the office for more than 2 terms. The President forms the executive branch of the democracy while the Congress does the legislative work.

The video is brought to you by NewsGram in collaboration with Voice of America.

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Migrant Surge at US- Mexico Border Accelerates

More than 300,000 mostly Central American undocumented immigrants apprehended or requesting asylum so far in the current fiscal year

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Migrant Surge, US- Mexico Border
The Trump administration has requested supplemental funds for the current fiscal year and substantial increases in next year's DHS budget to address the border crisis. Pixabay

The Trump administration on Thursday said a surge of migrant arrivals at the southern U.S. border continues to accelerate, with more than 300,000 mostly Central American undocumented immigrants apprehended or requesting asylum so far in the current fiscal year, which began last October.

“We are in the midst of an ongoing humanitarian and security crisis at the southwest border,” acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan told a Senate panel. “Almost 110,000 migrants attempted to cross without legal status last month, the most in over a decade, and over 65% were families and unaccompanied children.”

At the current pace, 2019’s total for migrant arrivals would more than triple the number reported for all of 2018, which was 169,000.

Factors in migration

McAleenan said that while gang violence and rampant insecurity in three Central American nations has started to ebb, other factors, such as persistent droughts and a lack of economic opportunity, continue to compel a large number of people to trek north.

Migrant Surge, US- Mexico Border
Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan testifies before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee in Washington, May 23, 2019. VOA

The DHS acting secretary also highlighted U.S. policy as a “pull factor” for migrants.

“Families [apprehended at the border] can no longer be held together through an appropriate and fair proceeding, and essentially have a guarantee of release and an indefinite stay in the United States,” McAleenan told the Senate Homeland Security Committee. “It’s been exploited by smugglers who are advertising that opportunity, and that’s what’s causing the significant surge that we see this year.”

The administration’s handling of migrant children continued to be a focus of congressional scrutiny after news broke earlier this week that a sixth minor — a 10-year-old girl from El Salvador — had died in U.S. government custody.

“We all agree that we must absolutely secure our borders, but the death of children in custody is simply unacceptable,” the panel’s top Democrat, Michigan Sen. Gary Peters, said. “We must identify what went wrong and ensure that this doesn’t happen again.”

Overwhelmed system

McAleenan said he has directed that all arriving children receive health screenings, and that, on average, 65 migrants are taken to hospitals daily. Overall, he pointed to an overwhelmed system pushed to the breaking point.

Also Read-only Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh Face Serious Water Shortage

“Given the scale of what we are facing, we will exhaust our resources before the end of this fiscal year,” said McAleenan, who also serves as chief of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, an agency within DHS.

The Trump administration has requested supplemental funds for the current fiscal year and substantial increases in next year’s DHS budget to address the border crisis. The panel’s chairman echoed the calls.

“This is a growing crisis and we have to … pass that emergency spending bill,” Republican Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin said.

While agreeing that more resources are needed, several lawmakers said money alone can’t resolve the situation.

FILE – In this April 29, 2019, photo, Cuban migrants are escorted by Mexican immigration officials in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, as they cross the Paso del Norte International bridge to be processed as asylum seekers on the U.S. side of the border. VOA

“I think the smartest thing we could actually do would be comprehensive immigration reform, and God willing, someday we’ll get back and do that,” Delaware Democratic Sen. Tom Carper said. (VOA)