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Valkyrie: NASA humanoid robot dances to techno music

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New Delhi: US Space agency NASA released a new video of a humanoid robot R5 on Thursday, popularly known as Valkyrie. The video shows the robot dancing and waving hands on techno music.

According to a newspaper, NASA has plans to send the humanoid robot to Mars and further into deeper space locations.

Although, it is needed to be understood that why is this dancing robot important for humans and the most probable reason is that it can very soon lead to a technology of robots living in tune with the human environment. The major reason of the video being published and awareness being created is so that people can soon expect a human-technology interphase.

The R5 is expected to be a stepping stone at finding a convenient way to achieve a safe expedition for humans working in a nuclear or any high explosive place. The aim of developing the robot was to make it function in an environment designed for humans. The developers of the R5, Darpa Robotics claims that Valkyrie, if sent into securing a nuclear reactor, can navigate walkways, doorways, and control rooms and be able to manipulate everything from buttons to valves.

Likewise, if the robot is sent into space, it would be helpful as it can effortlessly ride in a spacecraft designed for a human crew and also help astronauts explore the surface of Mars.

That is one of the major reasons for NASA being interested in a working humanoid. Though, for the humanoid to be useful as assistants on space missions, a navigational sense of the terrain along with dexterous and swift reactions as a human are yet to be installed. If the humanoid can’t lunge over a crater, it will of less importance as compared to humans.

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Trump Increases NASA Spending by $1.6 Billion With Goal of Returning to Moon

"I am updating my budget to include an additional $1.6 billion so that we can return to Space in a BIG WAY!"

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NASA
NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine talks to employees about the agency's progress toward sending astronauts to the moon and on to Mars during a televised event, Monday, March 11, 2019. VOA

The Trump administration asked Congress on Monday to increase NASA spending next year by an extra $1.6 billion to accommodate the accelerated goal of returning Americans to the surface of the moon by 2024.

The increased funding request, announced by President Donald Trump on Twitter, comes nearly two months after Vice President Mike Pence declared the objective of shortening by four years NASA’s timeline for putting astronauts back on the moon for the first time since 1972.

The proposed increase would bring NASA’s total spending level for the 2020 fiscal year to $22.6 billion. The bulk of the increase is earmarked for research and development for a human lunar landing system, according to a summary provided by NASA.

NASA
“I am updating my budget to include an additional $1.6 billion so that we can return to Space in a BIG WAY!”, says Trump. Pixabay

“Under my Administration, we are restoring @NASA to greatness and we are going back to the Moon, then Mars,” Trump tweeted late on Monday. “I am updating my budget to include an additional $1.6 billion so that we can return to Space in a BIG WAY!” NASA had previously aimed to return crewed spacecraft to the lunar surface by the year 2028, after first putting a “Gateway” station into orbit around the moon by 2024.

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The newly accelerated goal – an endeavor likely to cost tens of billions of dollars – comes as NASA has struggled with the help of private partners to resume human space missions from U.S. soil for the first time since the shuttle program ended in 2011.

The U.S. Apollo program, NASA’s forerunner to the effort at returning humans to Earth’s natural satellite, tallied six manned missions to the moon from 1969 to 1972. So far, only two other nations have conducted controlled “soft” landings on the moon – the former Soviet Union and China. But those were with unmanned robot vehicles. (VOA)