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Valkyrie: NASA humanoid robot dances to techno music


New Delhi: US Space agency NASA released a new video of a humanoid robot R5 on Thursday, popularly known as Valkyrie. The video shows the robot dancing and waving hands on techno music.

According to a newspaper, NASA has plans to send the humanoid robot to Mars and further into deeper space locations.

Although, it is needed to be understood that why is this dancing robot important for humans and the most probable reason is that it can very soon lead to a technology of robots living in tune with the human environment. The major reason of the video being published and awareness being created is so that people can soon expect a human-technology interphase.

The R5 is expected to be a stepping stone at finding a convenient way to achieve a safe expedition for humans working in a nuclear or any high explosive place. The aim of developing the robot was to make it function in an environment designed for humans. The developers of the R5, Darpa Robotics claims that Valkyrie, if sent into securing a nuclear reactor, can navigate walkways, doorways, and control rooms and be able to manipulate everything from buttons to valves.

Likewise, if the robot is sent into space, it would be helpful as it can effortlessly ride in a spacecraft designed for a human crew and also help astronauts explore the surface of Mars.

That is one of the major reasons for NASA being interested in a working humanoid. Though, for the humanoid to be useful as assistants on space missions, a navigational sense of the terrain along with dexterous and swift reactions as a human are yet to be installed. If the humanoid can’t lunge over a crater, it will of less importance as compared to humans.

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NASA’s instrument to measure Sun’s energy

For instance, spectral irradiance measurements of the Sun's ultraviolet radiation are critical to understanding the ozone layer -- Earth's natural sunscreen

NASA to release two missions focused on moon soon in 2022. Pixabay
NASA's new instrument can measure incoming solar energy. Pixabay
  • NASA’s new instrument can measure Sun’s incoming energy
  • The instrument is called Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1)
  • This can help bring in an energy revolution in future

To continue long-term measurements of the Sun’s incoming energy, NASA has powered on a new instrument installed on the International Space Station (ISS).

Solar energy is one of the biggest energy sources in the world.

The instrument, Total and Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1), became fully operational with all instruments collecting science data as of this March, NASA said.

“TSIS-1 extends a long data record that helps us understand the Sun’s influence on Earth’s radiation budget, ozone layer, atmospheric circulation, and ecosystems, and the effects that solar variability has on the Earth system and climate change,” said Dong Wu, TSIS-1 project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. TSIS-1 studies the total amount of light energy emitted by the Sun using the Total Irradiance Monitor, one of two sensors onboard.

Also Read: Why is the Sun’s atmosphere much hotter than its surface

This sensor’s data will give scientists a better understanding of Earth’s primary energy supply and provide information to help improve models simulating the planet’s climate.

The second onboard sensor, called the Spectral Irradiance Monitor, measures how the Sun’s energy is distributed over the ultraviolet, visible and infrared regions of light. Measuring the distribution of the Sun’s energy is important because each wavelength of light interacts with the Earth’s atmosphere differently.

Measuring solar energy is one big technological developement. Pixabay

For instance, spectral irradiance measurements of the Sun’s ultraviolet radiation are critical to understanding the ozone layer — Earth’s natural sunscreen that protects life from harmful radiation.

“All systems are operating within their expected ranges,” said Peter Pilewskie, TSIS-1 lead scientist at the University of Colorado Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in the US. IANS

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