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Varaha: The third Avatar of Lord Vishnu

Varaha is a boar like avatar of Lord Vishnu

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Avatars of Lord Vishnu (Source: Wikimedia commons)
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  • ‘Varaha’ is his third avatar of Lord Vishnu followed by Kurma avatar and succeeded by Narasimha avatar.
  • Vishnu Puran treats Varah as a symbol of sacrifice.
  • Varaha is a boar like avatar of Lord Vishnu

Among Dashavatars of Lord Vishnu, ‘Varaha’ is his third avatar followed by Kurma avatar and succeeded by Narasimha avatar. Varaha is a boar like avatar of Lord Vishnu. Some people also believe that Lord Vishnu was born oh his tusks in this avatar and was capable to lift up the Earth on his tusks after killing the demon.

Lord Vishnu Temple (Lower Padmanabham Temple) at Padmanabham Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Lord Vishnu Temple (Lower Padmanabham Temple) at Padmanabham Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Here are ten facts about Varaha avatar of Lord Vishnu

  • Varaha avatar is first avatar of Lord Vishnu with a head of an animal and rest as human body. While the Matasya and Kurma avatar, depicts frame of a human body while the bottom part depicts animal body.
  • Chalukya was the first dynasty to use Varaha avatar engravings on the coins. Varaha was worshipped highly till Muslims came in India. Muslims treat pigs as impure and unclean, from then Varaha worship declined.
  • The generation of first millennia treated Varaha as the symbol of manhood. On the other hand, Vishnu Puran treats Varah as a symbol of sacrifice.
  • Varaha avatar had been evolved when a devil named Hiranyakshya took earth to the bottom of the ocean. Mother earth, then, asked Lord Vishnu to help her. Lord Vishnu came in Varaha (boar) avatar and defeated Hiranyakshya and carried Earth on his tusks and came out of the ocean.

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  • Varaha Avatar helped Earth to come out of the ocean after pralay and in this way started a new cycle of the world.
  • According to Vishnu Purana, every part of Varaha has some significance like feet of Varah symbolize Vedas, tusk symbolizes suffering, hair represents grass, joints symbolizes different ceremonies, ears denotes rituals, coarse hairs denotes sexual improves, eyes as day and night and nostrils symbolizes gifts.
  • Lord Varaha is worshipped in many parts of Southern India. There are many temples having Varah avatar of Lord Vishnu. Some of the famous temples to Lord Varaha are Tirumala temple, Shri Mooshnam temple, Varah Swamy temple in Secunderabad district of Andhra Pradesh.
  • There is a special connection between Varaha and Tirupati temple. If one goes to Tirupati temple, first worship Varah temple in Adi Varah Kshetra of Tirupati then go and take blessings from Tirupati Balaji.

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  • To mark the evolution of Varaha Avatar many people celebrate Varaha Avatar Jayanti. On this occasion one would do jagran all the night recalling the stories of Lord Vishnu and his dashavatars. Some people also fast on this day. All those who fast on this day will be worshipping a small statue of Lord Vishnu in Kalash followed by Visarjan.
  • One can fiund the engravings of Lord Varaha in Badami (Karnataka), in Ellora caves in Maharashtra, in Varah Cave temple in Mahabalipuram and in Udaygiri Caves in Madhya Pradesh.

-by Aparna Gupta, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter @writetoaparna

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  • devika todi

    it is always fascinating to know more about Hindu mythology.

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Mesmerising Temple Towns Near Bangalore

Due to a large influx of people from all over the world into the city, Bangalore is now a melting pot of culture and attracts people from various walks of life

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The center of India's high-tech industry, the city is also known for its parks and nightlife.
The center of India's high-tech industry, the city is also known for its parks and nightlife. Wikimedia Commons
  • Bangalore often referred as the Garden City and Silicon Valley
  • The city is also home to many temples that are regularly flocked by devotees

Bangalore is endowed with many titles that capture the essence of the city. Garden City and Silicon Valley are often used to refer to this culturally rich city. Due to a large influx of people from all over the world into the city, Bangalore is now a melting pot of culture and attracts people from various walks of life. The city is also home to many temples that are regularly flocked by devotees. Apart from these, there are quite a few places of worship around Bangalore that are worth a visit.

Bangalore taxi service is available to anyone wishing to make a journey to these temples.

Ghati Subramanya

Located on the outskirts of Bangalore, at distance of 60 km from the city, Ghati Subramanya temple has Lord Karthikeya as its primary deity. The temple also houses idols of Lord Narasimha and the idols of both these deities are believed to have emerged from the earth.

Subramanya temple has Lord Karthikeya as its primary deity.
Subramanya temple has Lord Karthikeya as its primary deity. Wikimedia Commons

The temple has a history that dates back to almost 600 years and is believed to be developed under the Ghorpade rulers of Sandur. Devotees believe that when couples having trouble conceiving take a vow at this temple, they will be blessed with children.

Also Read: These 5 Ancient Temples are Believed to be the Oldest in India

Chamundi Temple

Chamundi temple, located on the famous Chamundi Hills is a popular temple in Mysore and is visited by devotees and tourists alike throughout the year. The temple is located about 160 km from the city of Bangalore, which makes it a little over a 3-hour drive from the city.

The temple also has a flight of one thousand steps which were built in 1659 and leads to the summit of the 3000-foot hill.
The temple also has a flight of one thousand steps which were built in 1659 and leads to the summit of the 3000-foot hill. Wikimedia Commons

The temple is also believed to be one among the 18 Shakti Peethas. The construction of the temple is credited to the Hoysala rulers, who reportedly built it in the 12th century. However, the tower of the temple is believed to have been constructed by the Vijayanagara rulers in the 17th century. The temple also has a flight of one thousand steps which were built in 1659 and leads to the summit of the 3000-foot hill. The temple also has several idols of Nandi, but the biggest one is the one situated on the 800th step. This idol of Nandi is about 15 feet in height and 24 feet in length.

Also Read: Top 10 Famous Hindu Temples of Tamil Nadu

You can book cabs from Bangalore to Mysore to visit this marvellous temple perched on the top of the hill.

Kotilingeshwara

The Kotilingeshwara temple is located 96 km from the city of Bangalore, in the district of Kolar. You can reach the place in around two and a half hours by road. The temple is famous due to its huge lingams (Shiva idol), which is the largest lingam in the entire world, which stands 108 feet tall.

The Kotilingeshwara temple is located 96 km from the city of Bangalore, in the district of Kolar.
The Kotilingeshwara temple is located 96 km from the city of Bangalore, in the district of Kolar. Wikimedia Commons

The temple has ten million lingas as indicated by its name, where ‘Koti’ stands for crore or ten million. These were installed by Bhakta Manjunatha, an ardent devotee of Lord Shiva with the help of Maharaja Ambikeshwaravarma and his family. Bhakta Manjunatha, born to a pious Shaiva family was an atheist who did not believe in Lord Shiva. He is believed to have insulted Lord Shiva ten million times. The ten million lingas installed by him were done as an act of repentance of this after he came to realize the divinity of Lord Shiva.

Also Read: 7 Most Famous Temples to Visit in Uttar Pradesh

All these temple towns are located at a short distance from the city of Bangalore and can be easily accessible in a taxi.