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Vertical farming: A big leap towards sustainable farming

The vertical farming reduces the dependency and cost of skilled labourers, weather conditions, soil fertility or high water usage.Nearly 30% profitability can be obtained through this technique.

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Vertical Farming. Image source: Industrytap.com
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What Is Vertical Farming?

Vertical farming is the technique of producing food in stacked layers or on vertically inclined surfaces which comprises of new automated farms. It requires less natural dependency and helps in reducing the dependency and cost of skilled labourers, weather conditions, soil fertility or high water usage.

What Vertical Farming Does?

  • Modern day vertical farming includes controlled environment agriculture technology i.e. CEA technology. All other environmental factors can be controlled using this technique. Techniques such as augmentation of sunlight by artificial lightning and by metal reflectors are also used for producing a similar greenhouse-like effect.
  • Vertical farms is a pesticide-free technique which requires much less input than traditional farming methods and gives much more output.
  • Farms embedded with this technique uses artificial lighting systems that facilitate enhanced photosynthesis. LEDs are placed near plants to impart specific wavelengths of lights for more photosynthesis. This enhances productivity.
  • Aeroponic mist’ is another technique used which helps in supplying the proper amount of oxygen and other soil nutrients. This makes the nature of growth more robust.

Advantages & Benefits of vertical farming techniques are as follows:

  • Vertical farming enables Reliable harvest. With it, the term ‘seasonal crops’ becomes obsolete. Irrespective of sunlight, pests or extreme temperature, these farms can easily meet the demand of contractors anytime.
  • Minimum overheads – Nearly 30% profitability can be obtained through this growing technique.
    • Low energy usage – Use of computerized LEDs by giving proper wavelength reduces energy to a great extent.
    • Low labour costs – Fully automated technique so no skilled labours are required.
    • Low water usage – Controlled transpiration technique are used. It requires only 10% of the water usage of traditional technique.
    • Reduced washing and processing – No pests control required. Reduces the cost of damage washing.
    • Reduced transportation costs – Can be established in any location. This reduces the cost of transportation and usage.
  • Increased growing area – Enables cost effective farming and provides nearly 8 times more productivity.
  • Maximum crop yield – Irrespective of other geographic factors Vertical Farming technique gives maximum yield.
  • A wide range of crops – Growth of crop are maintained by an intensive database which enables them to grow a wide range of crops such as Baby spinach, Baby rocket, Basil, Tatsoi, Leaf lettuce.
  • Fully integrated technology – All environmental factors are closely monitored and are maintained in an optimal range.
    • Optimum air quality
    • Optimum nutrient and mineral quality
    • Optimum water quality
    • Optimum light quality

All these technologies used leads to a dramatic shift in plant growth rates and their yields.

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Prepared by Pritam. Twitter handle @pritam_gogreen

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India Is Developing Technologies To Launch Manned Mission

The state-run ISRO’s technology demonstrator is the first in a series of tests to qualify as a crew escape system, critical for a manned mission.

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India’s dream to put a man in space
India’s dream to put a man in space. Pixabay

India is developing critical technologies for launching manned missions in space and preparing a document on it, a top official said on Saturday.

“Critical technologies are being developed for our human space programme as it is India’s dream to put a man in space. A mission document is in the making,” Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chairman K. Sivan told the media at an aerospace event here.

Citing the space agency’s successful maiden unmanned pad abort test on Thursday at its Sriharikota spaceport in Andhra Pradesh for the safe escape of the crew in an emergency, Sivan said that very complex technology was used for the trial, with a unique motor for fast-burning.

“The technology is very essential for our manned missions in the future, as the motor’s performance was very good. Using aerodynamics, the module was turned in a favourable direction to open the parachutes,” he said.

The state-run ISRO’s technology demonstrator is the first in a series of tests to qualify as a crew escape system, critical for a manned mission.

“We are only in the preparation stage. We need to develop much more. We are in the process of refining a document on the manned mission for review and interactions with stakeholders, including the Indian Air Force (IAF) and Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL),” said Sivan.

The crew escape system is an emergency escape measure designed to quickly pull the crew module along with the astronauts to a safe distance from the launch vehicle in the event of a launch abort.

The first pad abort test demonstrated the safe recovery of the crew module in case of any exigency at the launch pad,” ISRO said in a statement earlier.

Admitting that the scientists had to work on the next strategy for the manned mission testing, Sivan said ISRO’s work was two-pronged, with one on approved projects and the other for research and development (R&D).

The first pad abort test demonstrated the safe recovery of the crew module in case of any exigency at the launch pad,” ISRO said in a statement earlier.
The first pad abort test demonstrated the safe recovery of the crew module in case of any exigency at the launch pad,” ISRO said in a statement earlier. Flickr

“The pad abort test for the crew escape system is part of our R&D work,” he noted. The space agency also tested five new technologies during the pad abort test, as part of its strategy to develop long-term technologies.

“We and the government work on a three-year plan, with a seven-year strategy and a 15-year vision,” asserted Sivan.

Noting that space tourism would happen in the near future, the rocket scientist said it would take at least 15 years to develop the vehicle to go to space and return to the earth.

“We are not close to that. We need to work a lot towards achieving the dream of putting a man into space,” added Sivan.

After a five-hour countdown, the crew escape system lifted off with the 12.6 tonne simulated crew module from the spaceport and plunged into the sea (Bay of Bengal) 4 minutes and 19 seconds later with two parachutes, around 2.9 km away from Sriharikota, about 90km northeast of Chennai.

Also read: NASA Scientists Map Water on Moon Using India’s Chandrayaan-1 Spacecraft!

“The crew module soared 2.7 km altitude on thrust of its seven solid motors without exceeding the safe G (gravity) levels,” added the statement. (IANS)