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Video: Police taking bribes on National Highway

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source: huffingtonpost
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By Arnab Mitra

Kolkata: The night-time National Highway is a ripe ground for police to extort bribes from truck drivers and other passers-by.

The video, taken on Sunday at the National Highway 34 in Barasat, West Bengal, clearly shows a policeman taking bribes from the truck drivers and other vehicles.

On being asked about this, the officer in charge at the Barasat Police Station reacted in a very casual manner: “Kato hanuman lonkay alo ar gelo, jatosob. Apni photo journalism na Kore CID join korun anek taka paben.” (A lot of monkeys have come and gone in Lanka. Maybe you should leave photojournalism and join the CID, you will get more money.)

Truck drivers live in fear of their license being snatched, and so do what they are asked without causing trouble.

Kamalesh Singh, a truck driver said, “We are forced to give bribes, else they will snatch our license.”

“Everyone knows about it. It will never change,” said the head of North 24 Pargana truck association, Anando Jana.

Truck owner Sangeet Jaiswal lamented the constant loss due to the bribes. “Kya batayein bhaiya, sara paisa urdi walon ko detey detey nikal raha hai. Police, politician, sab lok humare mehnat ka paisa kha rahe hain, aur hum bhookhey mar rahe hein. Gari ka maintenance, driver ka paisa, upar se police. Aur ab toh election reviews hone wala hai… aur bhi dena padega.”

(What to say brother… All the money goes in paying uniform wearing people. The police and politicians take all our hard earned money while we die hungry. Vehicle maintenance, fees for the driver, the police, and now election reviews are coming, so we will have to give even more.)

“Police are supposed to protect the people, but it is the sorry state of West Bengal that the police and politicians have joined hands in looting the common people,” said former BJP state president Rahul Singha.

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A Data Project To Predict Human Trafficking Before It Occurs By Corporate Giants

Along with IBM and Western Union, participants include Europol, Europe's law enforcement agency is also included

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Human Trafficking
People protesting against human trafficking and slavery raise their fists during a demonstration in Mexico City. VOA

Computer giant IBM Corp., financial services company Western Union
Co. and European police launched a project Thursday to share financial data that they said may one day be able to predict human trafficking before it occurs.

The shared data hub will collect information on money moving around the world and compare it with known ways that traffickers move their illicit gains, highlighting red flags signaling potential trafficking, organizers said.

“We will build and aggregate that material, using IBM tools, into an understanding of hot spots and routes and trends,” said Neil Giles, a director at global anti-slavery group Stop the Traffik, which is participating in the project.

Human Trafficking
Ethnic Uighur Muslim boy stands inside a police van in Khlong Hoi Khong of southern Songkhla province, Thailand. He was in a group of 200 people rescued from a human trafficking camp. VOA

Data collection, digital tools and modern technology are the latest weapons in the fight against human trafficking, estimated to be a $150 billion-a-year global business, according to the International Labor Organization.

The U.N. has set a goal of 2030 for ending forced labor and modern slavery worldwide, with more than 40 million people estimated to be enslaved around the world.

Certain patterns and suspicious activity might trigger a block of a transaction or an investigation into possible forced labor or sex slavery, organizers said.

The project will utilize IBM’s internet cloud services as well as artificial intelligence and machine learning to compare data and to spot specific trafficking terms, said Sophia Tu, director of IBM Corporate Citizenship.

Human Trafficking
The project will utilize IBM’s internet cloud services

With a large volume of high-quality data, the hub one day may predict trafficking before it happens, she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“You can’t do it today because we’re in the process of building out that amount of data and those capabilities, but it’s in the road map for what we want to do,” she said.

While law enforcement is teaming up with banks and data specialists to chase trafficking, experts have cautioned tha