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Visually challenged boy reads news on Tamil channel; teary-eyed parents watch in awe

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Overcoming the impediments of  blindness, an 11-year-old visually impaired boy surprised everybody yesterday when he read out a bulletin on Lotus News, a Tamil channel.

Clad in an orange shirt and a fawn waist-coat, Sriramanujam read out the special news at 5 P.M. for 22 minutes with the help of Braille, while his teary-eyed parents watched him in awe.

The news he read was a follow up on Nepal earthquake and the Mahinda Rajapaksa trial.

Channel Chairman, G K S Selvakumar told a news agency that the main reason to give a chance to a visually challenged boy was to promote and create awareness about eye donation among the masses, “So that such talented people get their vision back and achieve their goals.”

Sriramanujam, who is currently studying in fifth standard of Government School at Uliyampalayam, went through these news items six times before going live.

At present, he has been assigned a task of reading the special newsweekly. Selvakumar also said that Sriramanujam would become a permanent daily news reader after some time.

Sriramanujam stated that he wanted to achieve something in life. He chose the medium of TV so that many people could see him. His ambition is to be a Collector.

“I was scared in the first two minutes but then it was business and I read it fluently,” he said.

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Kids Spending More Time in Watching TV Get Less Sleep

On an average, young children without TVs in their bedrooms slept 30 minutes more at night than those with a TV in their bedroom

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Pre-schoolers who watch less than one hour of TV per day get 22 more minutes of sleep at night — or nearly 2.5 hours per week — than those who watch more than an hour of TV daily, new research has found.

The study, published in Sleep Health, Journal of the National Sleep Foundation, suggests that TV use by young children affects the quality and duration of sleep, measured by an actigraphic device kids wore like a watch on their wrist.

Moreover, while daytime napping was found to increase among the kids who watched the most TV, it did not fully compensate for the lost sleep at night.

“The good news is, this is addressable. Parents assumed that TV was helping their kids wind down. But it didn’t work. Those kids weren’t getting good sleep, and it wasn’t helping them fall asleep better. It’s good to have this data,” said Rebecca Spencer, Associate Professor at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the US.

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Young kids who watch more TV get less sleep. Pixabay

A very diverse group of 470 pre-schoolers participated in the study, wearing actigraphs for up to 16 days. Their parents and caregivers answered questionnaires about demographics and the children’s health and behaviour, including detailed questions on TV use.

The findings showed that pre-schoolers who watch TV sleep significantly less than those who do not.

Also Read- First Smartphone App to Diagnose Child’s Ear Infections

On an average, young children without TVs in their bedrooms slept 30 minutes more at night than those with a TV in their bedroom, the study said.

The findings of the researchers come on the heels of new guidelines from the World Health Organisation (WHO), which say children between age 2 and 4 years should have no more than one hour of “sedentary screen time” daily – and less or no screen time is even better. (IANS)