Sunday December 16, 2018
Home World Voting in Sri...

Voting in Sri Lanka parliamentary polls shows upward trend

0
//
JAFFNA, SRI LANKA - SEPTEMBER 21: A sign directing voters to the polling station during the northern provincial council election on September 21, 2013 in Jaffna, Sri Lanka. Ethnic Tamil voters in Sri Lanka's war-ravaged north have gone to the polls on Saturday to form their first functioning provincial government since 1988 following 26-year long civil war that ended in the country in 2009.. (Photo by Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images)
Republish
Reprint

Colombo, Voting in Sri Lanka parliamentary polls on Monday showed an increase compared to previous turnouts, poll monitors said.

download (1)
www.washington.con

“It is a good sign to see the people enthusiastically casting their votes to elect the members of the new Parliament. The situation at election centres has so far been trouble free,” Campaign for Free and Fair Elections (CaFFE) Executive Director Ranjith Keerthi Tennakoon said.

He said CaFFE has deployed about 9,000 election monitors at voting centers across the country in addition to 430 mobile units, Daily Mirror reported.

Meanwhile, Centers for Monitoring Election Violence (CMEV) Media Coordinator Anuradha Guruge said queues began to increase after 8 a.m. with more people coming out to cast their votes.

“The CMEV has deployed around 5,000 local monitors, 21 foreign observers, 75 mobile units in addition to about 100 monitors who will be at counting centers.

(IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

President’s Dissolution of Parliament Unconstitutional: Sri Lanka’s Court

The push to oust Rajapaksa dragged Sri Lanka's parliament into chaos.

0
Sri Lanka, Parliament
Supporters of ousted Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe celebrate outside the supreme court complex in Colombo. VOA

Sri Lanka’s Supreme Court has ruled that President Maithripala Sirisena’s move to dissolve parliament last month was illegal.

In a unanimous decision announced Thursday, the seven-member court said that Sirisena violated the constitution when he called a snap election nearly two years before the parliamentary session was due to end.

The decision adds another chapter to a political crisis that began on on October 26, when President Sirisena fired Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe, claiming that an informant told police that a Cabinet minister was part of a plot to assassinate him.

Sri Lanka, parliament
Ousted Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe holds a copy of the constitution of Sri Lanka as he attends a media briefing at his official residence in Colombo, Oct. 29, 2018. VOA

He replaced Wickremesinghe with Mahinda Rajapaksa, the country’s former president and strongman, then suspended parliament the next day. In an apparent bow to international pressure, Sirisena summoned lawmakers back to work last Monday.

But when it became apparent that Rajapaksa would not survive a no-confidence vote, Sirisena dissolved parliament on November 9 and called for snap elections. The Supreme Court overruled the president’s decree in a ruling issued just days later.

Wickremesinghe has remained in the prime minister’s official residence in Colombo in defiance of Sirisena’s actions.

Sri Lanka, Parliament
Newly appointed Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa speaks during the parliament session in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Nov. 15, 2018. VOA

The push to oust Rajapaksa dragged Sri Lanka’s parliament into chaos. Speaker Karu Jayasuriya held a voice vote on November 14 on the no-confidence motion after Rajapaksa’s supporters staged an noisy, impromptu protest in the chamber before debate began.

Also Read: Sri Lanka On The Brink of ‘Economic Anarchy’

The next day, rival lawmakers exchanged blows after Jayasuriya declared that Sri Lanka had no prime minister or a cabinet, with some of Rajapaksa’s supporters hurling water bottles and other objects at Jayasuriya. (VOA)