Home India Water woes co...

Water woes continue to haunt Braj residents, politicians yet to take-up concrete steps

0

15-Yamuna-pollution-IndiaInk-superJumbo

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Even as Hema Malini completes one year as MP of Mathura-Vrindavan, residents are still awaiting the provision of safe and adequate drinking water that the cine veteran had promised. The land of Sri Krishna is yet to see a fully rejuvenated Yamuna, the lifeline of the janma-bhoomi.

The towns, mohallas and colonies in Mathura, Goverdhan, Vrindavan and Chaumuhan which are totally dependent on groundwater, do not have access to piped water supply and, therefore, remain bereft of clean water. The problem is further aggravated by the fall in water table levels.

“Earlier hand pumps were sufficient but now submersible pumps, tube wells and borings are coughing more air than water. No water is available till a depth of 150 feet or more, says river activist Madhu Mangal Shukla.

The water crisis is becoming acute by the day. Hordes of people have been protesting on roads for uninterrupted water supply.

Yamuna has earned the title of “sewage canal” by the residents. Even the Gokul Barrage, launched to clean the water supply has failed miserably.

The districts of Agra, Mathura and Firozabad continue to face acute shortage of power and water despite hundreds of crores of rupees being invested in infrastructural development in the eco-sensitive Taj Trapeizium Zone, spread over 10,400 sq km,

Work on a canal connecting the river Ganga is moving at a snail’s pace and the people in Firozabad are up in arms against the administration, demanding more water.

“The problem is not only of quantity but also quality of water in the river. Unless they desilt and dredge the river on a massive scale from Delhi to Agra, the underground aquafiers would not be charged and the water table will not rise,” activist Dr Ashok Bansal told IANS.

Villagers are facing similar problems. According to village panchayat member, Ram Bharosey in Chaumuhan block, the villagers have been demanding extension of water pipeline network to cover more areas, but to no avail.

Recognising the grave situation, the UP Chief Minister had installed a reverse-osmosis(RO) plant in Goverdhan on March 11. Following the move, the district administration has started supporting installation of reverse-osmosis (RO) plants where villagers can pay for water.

“The chief minister had sanctioned five more such plants for the Braj area. Each plant will provide 5,000 litres of water daily, which can be raised to 10,000 litres”, Mathura district magistrate Rajesh Kumar told IANS.

“The users will have to pay 50 paise per litre initially. Later it will be reduced to 25 paise per litre,” he added.

Farmers in the area, however, feel that such measures are like a drop in the ocean and more needs to be done.

“Young people are turning old, suffering the consequences of hard water. Fluorosis is common from the excessive fluoride in the water”, says Gopal Das, a farmer, adding that the ground water is hard and undrinkable.

Dr M.K Mathur of the public health centre at Chaumuhan says that due to the fluoride, magnesium, arsenic, calcium and other trace elements in the water people are falling sick.

Indicating the poor quality of water, an examination of 222 patients conducted last week in a village near Kosi, found 92 people to be hepatitis B and C positive. This has put the health authorities in the district on high alert.

“Village level functionaries are holding awareness activities to educate people about water-borne diseases. Jal Nigam officials have been asked to ensure supply of drinking water through tanks or pipelines to all such villages which have been identified as fluorosis-affected”, says Mathura’s chief development officer (CDO) Andra Vamsi.

Such efforts may take a while to bear fruit though. The water woes follow wherever one goes.

K.K Pathak, a resident in the Chata area, says that the state agencies have hardly helped to solve the problem. “Unless urgent measures are taken, the problem will become too big to tackle”, he says.

Pilgrims are being fleeced with water bottles selling at a premium in places such as Nandgaon and Barsana.

The desperate situation has resulted in the villagers of Pasauli taking measures into their own hands. They have pooled in money to dig a borewell where water could be reached.

Realising that self-help was the only mantra for progress, the villagers built a pipeline and brought the water to the village. To run the pump for the borewell, they arranged a tractor.

“Braj Bhoomi was once famous for its dense forests and water bodies. In the name of development, nature has been the loser and we humans the sufferers”, says Pankaj Goswami, a resident of Gokul.

It is high time the politicians did something concrete and lasting.

Next Story

The Indian Triple Disaster: Virus, Heat Wave And Locusts

Other than Coronavirus pandemic, India faces 2 more challenges to cope up with

0
Locusts
Migrant workers, who left cities and towns where they were abandoned by their employers, rest inside a tent before traveling in special trains arranged to transport them to villages in home states, at a railway station in Gauhati, India, May 28, 2020. VOA
By Associated Press

As if the coronavirus wasn’t enough, India grappled with scorching temperatures and the worst locusts invasion in decades as authorities prepared for the end of a monthslong lockdown despite recording thousands of new infections every day as per the Latest news on coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

This triple disaster drew biblical comparisons and forced officials to try to balance the competing demands of simultaneous public health crises: protection from eviscerating heat but also social distancing in newly reopened parks and markets.

The heat wave threatens to compound challenges of containing the virus, which has started spreading more quickly and broadly since the government began easing restrictions of one of the world’s most stringent lockdowns earlier this month.

“The world will not get a chance to breathe anymore. The ferocity of crises are increasing, and they’re not going to be spaced out,” said Sunita Narain of New Delhi’s Center for Science and Environment.

When her 6-year-old son woke up with a parched throat and a fever, housekeeper Kalista Ekka wanted to bring him to the hospital. But facing a deluge of COVID-19 patients, the doctor advised Ekka to keep him at home despite boiling temperatures in the family’s two-room apartment in a low-income neighborhood in South Delhi.

“The fan only makes it hotter but we can’t open the window because it has no screen,” and thus no defense against malaria and dengue-carrying mosquitoes, Ekka said.

In a nearby upmarket enclave crowded with walkers and joggers every morning and at dusk — some with face coverings, some without — neighbors debated the merits of masks in an online forum.

In the heat, “it is very dangerous to work out with a mask. So a Catch-22 situation,” said Asmita Singh.

heat locusts
India is facing high tempratures with many people lacking water and air conditioning. Pixabay

Temperatures soared to 118 degrees Fahrenheit (47.6 degrees Celsius) in the capital New Delhi this week, marking the warmest May day in 18 years, and 122 F (50 C) in the desert state of Rajasthan, after the world’s hottest April on record.

India suffers from severe water shortages and tens of millions lack running water and air conditioning, leaving many to seek relief under shady trees in public parks and stepwells, the ancient structures used to harvest rainwater.

Though many people continued wearing masks properly, others pushed them onto chins, or had foregone them altogether.

Cyclone Amphan, a massive super storm that crossed the unusually warm Bay of Bengal last week, sucked up huge amounts of moisture, leaving dry, hot winds to form a heat wave over parts of central and northern India.

At the same time, swarms of desert locusts have devastated crops in India’s heartland, threatening an already vulnerable region that is struggling with the economic cost of the lockdown.

Exasperated farmers have been banging plates, whistling or throwing stones to try to drive the locusts away, and sometimes even lighting fires to smoke them out. The swarms appeared poised to head from Rajasthan north to Delhi, but on Wednesday a change in wind direction sent them southward toward the state of Madhya Pradesh instead.

grasshopper-locusts
Swarms of desert locusts have devastated crops in India’s heartland. Pixabay

K.L. Gurjar, a top official of India’s Locust Warning Organization, said his 50-person team was scrambling to stop the swarms before breeding can take place during India’s monsoons, which begin in July. Otherwise, he said, the locusts could destroy India’s summer crops.

Meanwhile, India reported another record single-day jump of more than 6,500 coronavirus cases on Thursday, pushing up the total to 158,333 confirmed cases and 4,531 deaths.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government is preparing a new set of guidelines to be issued this weekend, possibly extending the lockdown in worst-hit areas while promoting economic activity elsewhere, with unemployment surging to 25%.

The sudden halt to the Indian economy when the lockdown began March 25 has been devastating for daily laborers and migrant workers, who fled cities on foot for their family homes in the countryside.

The government started running special trains for the migrants, but deaths on the rails because of starvation or dehydration have been reported. Others immediately put into quarantine centers upon their arrival in home districts have tested positive for COVID-19, adding to the burden of severely strained rural health systems.

mouth-guard
India reported another record single-day jump of more than 6,500 coronavirus cases. Pixabay

To jump start the economy, Modi’s environment ministry has moved to lower liabilities for industrial polluters and given private players the right to explore for coal and mine it. Cheap oil will fuel recovery efforts worldwide.

Also Read: IIT Mandi Researchers Have Developed Low-Cost Portable Ventilators

Indian environmental journalist Joydeep Gupta said that the perfect storm of pandemic, heat and locusts show India must go green. He said the government should implement policies to safeguard biodiversity and offer incentives for green energy to reduce greenhouse gases that cause climate change.

Instead, “the government is promoting the same sectors of the industry that have caused the multiple crises in the first place,” he said.

But Narain said other government initiatives that expand federal agriculture employment, cash transfer and food ration programs help India deal more effectively with its threats.
“It’s building coping abilities of the very poor to be able to deal with stress after stress after stress,” she said. (VOA)

Next Story

Know About the Various Fasting Methods for Weight Loss

Fasting for weight loss: Know the pros and cons

0
Weight loss
Fasting can have various health benefits and can help you out with your weight loss. Pixabay

Across India, fasting is generally linked with religious beliefs, and people fast before or during traditional rituals. On the other hand, fasting also has many health benefits and some of its pitfalls.

Many times, people ignore their bodily conditions and choose to fast. For instance, women who are breastfeeding or are pregnant must not fast. Also, people with Type 1 Diabetes who are on medication and people who have had a history with an eating disorder should consult a health specialist before altering a dietary pattern.

Fast can be done in various patterns: the ’16:8′ pattern involves 14 to 16 hours of fasting and eating between the 8 hours. Another fasting method is 5:2, that is fasting for alternate two days in a week.

Weight loss
A good diet can not only help you lose weight but it can also boost immunity. Pixabay

There are various types of fasting methods that you can follow considering your health condition, as says Shikha Mahajan, holistic nutritionist and founder of Diet Podium:

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent fasting or IF includes reducing calorie intake for an interval of time so that the person fasts for the other hours. This kind of fasting allows restricting the calorie intake and results in weight loss. Time-Restricted Fasting is also similar to IF.

Water Fasting

Water fasting is a way of fasting where the individual only takes water and the intake of food is restricted for a duration of time. This kind of fasting should only be preferred under medical supervision. Sometimes doctors prescribe this kind of fasting to cure various health issues. There is a major drawback of this fasting. Since it is very difficult for a body to survive only on water. Therefore, it can cause many adverse effects on the body.

Weight loss
Water fasting can help you lose weight but should only be preferred under medical supervision. Pixabay

Fasting Mimicking Diet

This is the diet that tricks the body to think it is fasting. The individual is allowed to eat but only the diet which includes plant-based food, low in carbs and calories, and high in fat.

Here are some pros of fasting. Fasting helps to boost immunity. It naturally increases energy and will help you to feel more alert and focused throughout the day. It helps you attain a leaner, harder physique as fasting kills body fat dead.

There are cons of fasting too. The desire to binge after fasting is the biggest problem people face with fasting. Sometimes people tend to overeat during the non-fasting duration. This can lead to health issues like hormonal imbalances, increase in stress and migraines.

Also Read- Follow These Home Decor Tips During Lockdown

Occasional lightheadedness is the major problem faced during fasting, To negate this con, you can start with shorter fasting periods first. Always remember fasting or changing your dietary pattern can make a big change to your body functioning, its metabolism and psyche.

Before opting for any kind of fast, consult a health expert and consider your health background. (IANS)

Next Story

Hydrate and Prepare Yourself for Summers

Avoid dehydration and water loss this summer

0
Summers
Avoiding excessive water loss and dehydration is essential especially in the summers. Pixabay

Come April, and the summer heat is only going to get more intense. Avoiding excessive water loss and dehydration is essential especially in the summers , says an expert.

“The human body is made up of 60 percent of water and as the temperature warms up this water loss can increase many folds. There is loss of not only water but also electrolytes from the body due excessive sweating. It may lead to fatigue, weakness, sunken eyes, decreased urine or dark colored urine, muscle pains, etc. In severe cases it may lead to heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, sunburn, or heat rash,” said Dr R K Bhel, Director, Internal Medicine, Max Super Speciality Hospital, Mohali.

It is crucial to drink plenty of fluids during hot and humid months. Fluids can be in form of plain water, fruit juices, coconut water or the good old nimboo paani or lemonade.

Summers
It is very crucial to stay hydrated during the hot summers. Pixabay

Hence, it becomes important to maintain water and electrolyte balance through proper hydration. As our water reserves go down, our body automatically sends a signal to the brain making us feel thirsty.

It is also a wise idea to stay indoors specially during the peak summer afternoons to minimize sweat loss.

In case of severe dehydration, one must go for Oral Rehydration Salt (ORS) as it contains sodium, glucose, potassium and chloride which helps in maintaining the electrolyte balance in the body, he suggests.

Also Read- COVID-19 Outbreak Has Reduced Pollution Levels: ESA

Also including fruits and vegetables like watermelon, cucumbers, strawberries, melons, lettuce, tomatoes, etc can help you keeping hydrated as they contain high water content.

Staying away from alcohol, coffee and excessive sugary drinks is a good idea as these make you dehydrated due to their diuretic action. (IANS)