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Weight gain—an aftereffect of alcohol consumption

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

You go through strenuous exercise and diet routines to maintain body-weight and shape, but one night you let yourself be drowned in alcohol, then all your efforts go down the drain. You’re once again back to square one. According to statistics given by the last survey conducted in 2010 by the World Health Organisation (WHO), 25 percent of the world population amounts for alcohol consumption.

So here is a wakeup call!

Flaming_cocktailsApart from adding extra calories in your system, alcohol also generates hunger, affects sleep and metabolism, and ultimately messes up your entire diet plan.

How does alcohol affect your diet? A single can of beer contains 154 calories and a martini contains around 250 calories, and none of these have any nutritional value. The same goes with other alcoholic drinks as well, and as your body does not use up these calories—you GAIN WEIGHT!

Skipping a meal to make up for gained calories due to drinking is of no use, as drinking on an empty stomach makes you queasy and so you have to eat to make that queasy feeling to go way. But then your control over your eating habits is also affected and you end up eating a lot more HIGH CALORIE comfort food.

Also alcohol leads to water loss through expanded pee, and the body looses important and vital minerals which are required to maintain fluid balance in the body. So, DEHYDRATION!
The salty foods like chips and peanuts makes you thirsty and you end up drinking more. Then again dehydration making you feel queasy, leading to more craving for food and so it keeps continuing like a circle which has no end.

Your body’s digestive system slows down by some 70 percent. Which means your body’s capacity to burn fat also slows down significantly, and in its place will start flushing out. Food and juices are easily digested by the body’s digestive system, but alcohol is more easily absorbed by the stomach and small intestine and is then delivered to the brain and liver. The liver converts alcohol into fat, which is stored in your body, and in the long run becomes the reason for weight gain.

Your average beverage, the wine to compliment your dinner, technically speaking, is the trigger to gain weight. Stating that alcohol consumption means weigh gain might be a more effective way to reach out to discourage drinking alcohol, than saying it leads to health problems which lead to death. After all, WHO WISHES TO BE CALLED FAT!

Next Story

Here’s Why Light Alcohol Consumption Might Also Increase Cancer Risk

The researchers found an almost linear association between cancer risk and alcohol consumption

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In a study published in the journal Cancer, the overall cancer risk appeared to be the lowest at zero alcohol consumption. Pixabay

If you thought one-two drinks a day would not do any harm, think again. Researchers in Japan have found that even light alcohol consumption might increase the cancer risk.

In the study published in the journal Cancer, the overall cancer risk appeared to be the lowest at zero alcohol consumption. The elevated risk appeared to be explained by alcohol-related cancer risk across relatively common sites, including the colorectum, stomach, breast, prostate and esophagus.

“In Japan, the primary cause of death is cancer,” said one of the researchers Masayoshi Zaitsu from The University of Tokyo. “Given the current burden of overall cancer incidence, we should further encourage promoting public education about alcohol-related cancer risk,” Zaitsu said. The team examined clinical data on 63,232 patients with cancer and 63,232 controls matched for sex, age, hospital admission date, and admitting hospital. The data was gathered from 33 general hospitals in Japan.

All participants reported their average daily amount of standardised alcohol units and the duration of drinking. One standardised drink containing 23 grams of ethanol was equivalent to one 180-ml cup of Japanese sake, one 500-ml bottle of beer, one 180-ml glass of wine, or one 60-ml cup of whiskey.

Drink, Alcohol, Cup, Whiskey, The Drink
If you thought one-two drinks a day would not do any harm, think again. Researchers in Japan have found that even light alcohol consumption might increase the cancer risk. Pixabay

The researchers found an almost linear association between cancer risk and alcohol consumption. A light level of drinking at 10-drink-year point, for example, one drink per day for 10 years or two drinks per day for five years would increase cancer risk by five per cent, the findings showed.

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Those who drank two or fewer drinks a day had an elevated cancer risk regardless of how long they had consumed alcohol. Also, analyses classified by sex, drinking/smoking behaviours and occupational class mostly showed the same patterns. (IANS)