Wednesday, August 12, 2020
Home Lead Story Wetlands Disappearing Faster Than Forests Due to Climate Change: Report

Wetlands Disappearing Faster Than Forests Due to Climate Change: Report

Authors of the report say biodiversity also is in a state of crisis. They say more than 25 percent of all wetlands plants and animals are at risk of extinction.

A new report warns that wetlands are disappearing three times faster than the world’s forests, with serious consequences for all life on earth due to climate change.

The Ramsar Convention on Wetlands is a global treaty ratified in 1971 by 170 countries to protect wetlands, which are ecosystems inundated by water, such as swamps, bogs and floodplains.

Unfortunately, the goal of this treaty is under threat. Ramsar Convention officials report about 35 percent of the world’s wetlands have been lost between 1970 and 2015.

Climate
Wetlands. Wikimedia Commons

State of crisis

Unless this situation is urgently reversed, Ramsar Convention Secretary-General Martha Roja Urrego warns the world will be in a state of crisis because wetlands are critical for all aspects of life.

“All the water that we use for consumption, irrigation and for hydro-electricity comes directly or indirectly from wetlands,” Urrego said. “Secondly, wetlands also have a main function in filtering waste and pollutants, so they act as the kidneys of the world. They filter the waste.”

Urrego says wetlands also are essential in regulating the global climate as peatlands store twice as much carbon as the world’s forests.

Amazon, Climate
This Sept. 15, 2009 file photo shows a deforested area near Novo Progresso in Brazil’s northern state of Para.. VOA

Several factors

The report finds wetland loss is driven mainly by such factors as climate change, population increase, changing consumption patterns and urbanization, particularly in coastal zones and river deltas.

Also Read: UN Agencies and Bangladesh Government Advances to Prevent Further Deforestation

Authors of the report say biodiversity also is in a state of crisis. They say more than 25 percent of all wetlands plants and animals are at risk of extinction.

Scientists say without biodiversity, there is no future for humanity, because the air people breathe, the water they drink and the food they eat ultimately rely on biodiversity in its many forms. (VOA)

STAY CONNECTED

18,957FansLike
362FollowersFollow
1,781FollowersFollow

Most Popular

Bollywood Blends In Janmashtami Colours

On the occasion of Janmashtami, celebrities took to social media to extend greetings to their fans, giving a glimpse of how they are celebrating...

5 Reasons Why More Online Casinos Accept Indians

Gambling in India is as old as India itself, so it is not surprising that more and more online casinos accept Indian punters, looking...

3 Types of ULIP Plans in India that Gives Guaranteed Returns

In today’s competitive world, there are plenty of saving and investment choices that decide your future financial wellbeing as well as that of your...

Mouthwash Use Can Reduce Covid Transmission Risk

In the fight against the novel Coronavirus, a team of German scientists has claimed that Sars-Cov-2 viruses can be "inactivated" using commercially available mouthwashes. According...

Increased Foreign Investments into India’s Gaming Market

There has been an increase in gaming activities in India since 2016. This has led to growth in the gaming sector of India. This...

Actress Madhuri Dixit Shares Her Bollywood Journey With Fans

Actress Madhuri Dixit-Nene went down memory lane and shared how she was bitten by the acting bug. "This day back in 1984 I started my...

This Survey Reveals India’s “Consciousness” Towards Diet and Nutrition

As many as 97 percent Indians are aware of the essential nutrients and micro-nutrients required for their body, of which 60 percent 'rarely' or...

Heavy Cigarette Smoking Leads To Complex Health Issues: Study

Each cigarette smoked a day by heavy smokers increases the risk of contracting several diseases by more than 30 per cent, warn researchers. The study,...

Recent Comments