Tuesday February 19, 2019

Who says only women make use of home remedies for various skin-related issues? Men do it too: Survey

The market may be flooded with a range of fancy grooming products, but men limit their usage to only face washes and sunscreen lotions

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Representative Image, Pixabay

Mumbai, March 31, 2017: Who says only women make use of home remedies for various skin-related issues? Men do it too, reveals a survey.

The survey, by Bigstylist.com — an online platform for beauty and grooming services, saw participation from 504 men aged between 25 to 50. As many as 36 per cent of them — especially from Mumbai and Pune — said they depend on home remedies for issues related to skin, especially their face.

The market may be flooded with a range of fancy grooming products, but men limit their usage to only face washes and sunscreen lotions, the survey said. This was supported by the fact that only 3 to 10 per cent of the respondents agreed to using face packs or masks and scrubs.

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While most women in showbiz are shown to prefer men who are bare-chested and waxed, men in reality do not really believe in shaving or trimming. Only 14 per cent men said that they trim or wax body hair.

“This is a really interesting finding, since mostly it’s only women who are known to look for home-remedy tutorials online for their beauty-related concerns. It was this survey that brought forth the fact that more and more men opt for home remedies too when it comes to clearing complexion or to get fairer skin,” Richa Singh, CEO, BigStylist.com, said in a statement. (IANS)

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Diet Drinks Increase Stroke Chances in Postmenopausal Women

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. 

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The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women. Pixabay

Are diet drinks your choice? Beware, your heart could be at risk. A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say.

The stroke is was caused by a blocked artery, especially small arteries.

The study, published in the journal Stroke, showed that compared with women who consumed diet drinks less than once a week or not at all, women who consumed two or more artificially sweetened beverages per day were 23 per cent more likely to have a stroke, 31 per cent more likely to have ischemic stroke, and 29 per cent were at risk of developing heart disease (fatal or non-fatal heart attack).

In addition, there was a 16 per cent risk of deaths from any cause.

 

 

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A new study suggests that drinking diet drinks was associated with an increased risk of having a stroke among post-menopausal women, researchers say. Pixabay

Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes, findings revealed.

“Many well-meaning people, especially those who are overweight or obese, drink low-calorie sweetened drinks to cut calories in their diet. Our research and other observational studies have shown that artificially-sweetened beverages may not be harmless and high consumption is associated with a higher risk of stroke and heart disease,” said lead author Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Associate Professor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the US.

For the study, researchers included 81,714 post-menopausal women aged 50-79 years.

The results in post-menopausal women may not be generalisable to men or younger women.

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Furthermore, stroke risks more than doubled in women without previous heart disease or diabetes and obese women without previous heart disease or diabetes. Pixabay

Also Read: Top 3 Factors That Play a Major Role in Fertility Issues in Women

“The American Heart Association suggests water as the best choice for a no-calorie beverage,” suggested Rachel K. Johnson, Professor at the University of Vermont in the US.

“Since long-term clinical trial data are not available on the effects of low-calorie sweetened drinks and cardiovascular health, given their lack of nutritional value, it may be prudent to limit their prolonged use,” Johnson added. (IANS)