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Why China wants to dock submarines in Colombo and deploy fighter jets in Tibet?

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By Harshmeet Singh

Over the past couple of decades, China’s growing territorial aspirants in South East Asia have made as many global headlines as its swiftly growing economy. China’s frequent expeditions in the Western Pacific Ocean and the South China Sea have been a sore in the eye of a number of smaller nations in the region. While China’s naval adventures haven’t given too much headache to the Indian Government till now, China’s stand on Tibet and Arunachal Pradesh have ensured that Hindi-Chini bhai bhai slogan remains a distant realization. It is China’s growing threat that has forced India to become the world’s largest arms importer, with an expenditure of 2.6% (2014) of its entire GDP.

The border dilemma

For the two countries sharing the largest disputed border in the world, India and China have shown commendable restrain of violence since the 1962 war. Barring some random controversies erupting from erroneous maps and stapled visa issues, the Line of Actual Control (LAC) has seen relative peace.

Tibet – core issue for China

In 1914, the representatives from Tibet, British India and China sat down to sign an agreement in order to mark clear boundaries distinguishing India, Tibet and China. According to the Simla Convention, China was to be given control over Inner part of Tibet, while the Outer Tibet was to be recognized as an autonomous area under the Dalai Lama.

Britain, on its part, pledged to restrain itself from any interference in Dalai Lama’s Tibet. But before the agreement was inked, Britain claimed Tawang (South Tibet – Now in Arunachal Pradesh), which irked China to such an extent that it boycotted the convention and the final agreement was signed only between Tibet and British India.

China, never a party to the final agreement, still claims rights over Tawang (which led to the 1962 war). After the Chinese army invaded Tibet in 1950, Dalai Lama was forced to take exile at Dharmshala, India. Due to China’s growing global stature, its atrocities in Tibet have always been given a blind eye by the world leaders.

Deployment of Su-27 fighters at Tibet

China’s move to station Su-27 fighters at its Tibet military base in 2013 raised quite a few eye-brows around the world. Many experts considered it as China’s response to India stationing its Su-30MKI fighters at Tezpur in Assam. With a combat radius of close to 1,000 km, India’s fighters were well equipped to strike the Mainland Chinese territories. With a growing firepower at its all weather military base in Tibet, China’s threat to Indian skies can’t be undermined anytime soon.

Growing bonhomie between China & Sri Lanka

A $ 1.5 billion project for the construction of the Colombo port city was awarded to the China Communications Construction Ltd. by the Rajapaksa Government before it was oust in the recent elections. With China’s growing influence in the island nation getting evident, India has a lot on its plate to worry about. China’s recent move to dock its nuclear submarine at the Colombo port didn’t help the already delicate Indo China relations either. Sri Lanka, on its part, reiterates its ‘No pro China. No pro India’ stand. Though the Lankan Government’s decision to halt the ongoing Colombo port city project would give some breathing space to India, a permanent solution to India’s fears still remains invisible.

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You Can Feel Better After Paying for an Online Service to Buy a Few Moments of Flattery in China

In fact, the enthusiasm has been such that even national media have warned of the dangers of relying on these virtual communities

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US clothing brand Gap has apologised for selling T-shirts which it said showed an
Accurate Map of China, Pixabay

If you are depressed for any reason, here is a chance in China to feel better after paying for an online service to buy a few moments of flattery — no matter what you think about yourself.

That is the idea behind “Kua Kua” groups, a phenomenon that has become very popular across China where depression and anxiety are on the rise.

Initially set up as communities in which university students encouraged each other amid academic pressure and little social activity, the Kua Kua (kua means to praise in Chinese) forums sprouted all over China after its social media success.

Efe news accessed one such forum, formed of about 500 students from the Jiaotong University of Xi’an, where, according to media, these groups originated.

“Hello. I have many problems when I try to do my job and that makes me sad. Can you cheer me up?”

In the next few minutes, several users responded with praises and messages of encouragement.

“That means you work with your heart and not superficially,” one message read.

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The Chinese flag is seen near the Google sign at the Google china headquarters in Beijing, China. VOA

“Fortune and misfortune depend on each other. Misfortune has already arrived, so happiness is closer,” said another.

“You face a lot of pressure but you do it bravely. Your attitude is positive. I like it,” the third one read.

However, not all groups are altruistic. Popular e-commerce platforms such as Taobao have seen proliferation of stores where those in need can rent for a few minutes an entourage of professional flatterers.

Xiao Ruichen is 27 and manages a Kua Kua and a Taobao shop.

“I found out in mid-March through Weibo (Chinese Twitter). It was very popular. So, I decided to make one of my own. Life is getting faster and people are on the verge of anxiety, anguish and depression,” he said.

“This service is very popular,” he said, adding people feel better after a session of flattery and “that makes me feel happy”.

Xiao charges 38 yuan ($5.7) for five minutes and 68 yuan for 10 minutes following which the client is removed from the forum.

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Although he preferred not to disclose how much money he earns each month, Xiao said that about 35 per cent of his income goes to the other members – more than a 100 college students whom he has selected under strict criteria such as writing speed or the ability to entertain clients.

According to figures offered by official media, the largest seller of accesses to these Kua Kua forums on Taobao may have earned more than 83,000 yuan in February.

In fact, the enthusiasm has been such that even national media have warned of the dangers of relying on these virtual communities. (IANS)