Friday April 19, 2019
Home Uncategorized WikiLeaks rev...

WikiLeaks reveals the true story behind Sony, North Korea and The Interview

0
//

WikileaksFlag

By NewsGram Staff Writer

WikiLeaks placed thousands of emails and documents from last year’s devastating cyber attack against Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) into a searchable online archive.

The database contains more than 170,000 emails from Sony Pictures and a subsidiary, plus more than 30,000 other documents. The archives also throw light on how North Korea hacks Sony and steals lots of innocent people’s communications, and how WikiLeaks is determined to go ahead and make them searchable.

However, after the crippling cyber attack against SPE, the White House asserted in November 2014 that North Korea’s intelligence services had obtained and distributed a version of the archive in revenge for SPE’s pending release of The Interview, a movie centered on the assassination of North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un.

The whistleblower organization stated in its press release published on April 16th, 2015, that the Sony archives offer a rare insight into the inner workings of a large, secretive multinational corporation in fully searchable format on WikiLeaks. The Archives illustrate that Sony is an influential corporation, which has ties with the White House, and also has ability to impact laws and policies. The archives also show that Sony has connections to the US military-industrial complex.

The published emails give details on Sony being a member of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), and the emails also assert that Sony is a strong lobbyist on issues around internet policy, piracy, trade agreements and copyright issues. The emails also explain the back and forth on lobbying and political efforts, not just with the MPAA but with politicians directly.

“This archive shows the inner workings of an influential multinational corporation. It is newsworthy and at the centre of a geo-political conflict. It belongs in the public domain. WikiLeaks will ensure it stays there,” said Julian Assange, editor-in-chief of WikiLeaks.

On the other hand, Sony strongly condemned WikiLeaks’ release of the searchable archive. “The cyber-attack on Sony Pictures was a malicious criminal act, and we strongly condemn the indexing of stolen employee and other private and privileged information on WikiLeaks,” the company said in a statement. It also stated that they “vehemently disagree with WikiLeaks’ assertion that this material belongs in the public domain and will continue to fight for the safety, security and privacy of our company.”

Next Story

Sony to Curb Explicit Content in PlayStation Games

Sony's home turf of Japan has a reputation for having a higher tolerance for erotic games -- games that might be considered risque, or outright offensive, in the US

0
Sony Pictures, North Korean, Computer
Pedestrians walk past an exterior wall of Sony Pictures Studios in Los Angeles, California, Dec. 4, 2014. That year, Sony became the victim of a cyber hack by North Korean operatives from the Lazarus Group. VOA

Sony is putting in place stricter rules on sexual content in its PlayStation video games, based on the rise of the #MeToo movement that took industries like tech and entertainment by storm.

“Sony Corp is cracking down on sexual content in PlayStation 4 videogames globally, reflecting concerns in the US about the depiction of women in games, but also irritating some software developers.

“New in-house standards that limit sexually explicit content distinguish Sony from other game-hardware makers that allow more leeway as long as the software carries a rating from a national industry body,” The Wall Street Journal reported late on Tuesday.

Technology
People look through Sony PlayStation VR headsets after a Sony news conference at CES International in Las Vegas, Jan. 8, 2018. VOA

The move is reportedly aimed at helping developers “offer well-balanced” content that does not “inhibit the sound growth and development” of young people.

“Sony is concerned the company could become a target of legal and social action,” a spokesperson for Sony in the US was quoted as saying by The WSJ.

The rule appears to have hit a number of titles already, including the “Devil May Cry 5”.

Sony’s home turf of Japan has a reputation for having a higher tolerance for erotic games — games that might be considered risque, or outright offensive, in the US.

Whatever the exact rules, some developers aren’t happy. There have been instances where developers had to cover up characters using light rays, smoke or similar effects, and there’s a fear this will curb creativity among developers. (IANS)